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  1. #16
    Senior Member Robert Pickett's Avatar
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    Tubin is indeed well worth hearing, I'd say one of the essential twentieth century symphonists. I had the Sinfonietta on in the car on the way to work this morning!!

    However, considering him a Swede is pushing it, I reckon, even if he spent his last forty years there, and took citizenship. He is Estonian to the core. And I think many of his later in life influences remained closer to the Soviet roots (Prokofiev et al) rather than the Scandinavian.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member Orfeo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Pickett View Post
    Tubin is indeed well worth hearing, I'd say one of the essential twentieth century symphonists. I had the Sinfonietta on in the car on the way to work this morning!!

    However, considering him a Swede is pushing it, I reckon, even if he spent his last forty years there, and took citizenship. He is Estonian to the core. And I think many of his later in life influences remained closer to the Soviet roots (Prokofiev et al) rather than the Scandinavian.
    I think Tubin's Sixth Symphony has Prokofievian touches, true enough, but I cannot really say that regarding, for instance, his Tenth, which is Estonian in atmosphere, but with Nordic touches here and there. Even his Sinfonietta evokes Grieg somewhat.

    But yes, in the final analysis, Tubin remained Estonian to the core.
    Last edited by Orfeo; Sep-13-2018 at 15:41.
    David A. Hollingsworth (dholling)

    ~All good art is about something deeper than it admits.
    Roger Ebert

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  5. #18
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    I just posted the following on another thread here at the Forum, but it seems appropriate here, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by SONNET CLV View Post
    I'm reminded of this thread after listening tonight to the Third Symphony ("Facetter", 1950) of Karl-Birger Blomdahl, which is recorded along with the composer's first two symphonies on BIS-CD-611.

    Attachment 108861

    I know I've already nominated a favorite BIS disc in an earlier post, but since Blomdahl's Symphony No. 3 has long proven a favorite modern symphony of mine, I'll give it a shout out here.

    The liner notes (by Per F. Broman) state that this is "one of the greatest Swedish symphonies ever written, was Blomdahl's first real masterpiece and has justly received popular acclaim ever since its completion. Being one of the first Scandinavians to show any interest in twelve-tone technique, Blomdahl planned this symphony in a dodecaphonic manner. Blomdahl nevertheless claimed that Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique did not suite him. What he wanted to achieve was a personal expressive language ranging from tonality to atonality and from simplicity to complexity."

    The symphony clocks in at 22:38, and if you haven't yet encountered this one, please put it on your "must hear" list, soon.

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  7. #19
    Senior Member Robert Pickett's Avatar
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    I will confess to having never heard of this Blomdahl chap, he's never been on my radar. But I have ordered the BIS CD of his three symphonies, and will post my calm considered (sic) opinion when I can.

    Thanks for the heads up, looking forward to hearing this!

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  9. #20
    Senior Member Robert Pickett's Avatar
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    A big thumbs up for this Blomdahl chap, by the way. I haven't been as impressed with a new discovery for ages. A work of genuine substance, No.3, which merits the praise heaped upon it earlier by Sonnet.

    Thanks for the introduction !
    Last edited by Robert Pickett; Oct-21-2018 at 17:24.

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  11. #21
    Member Dimace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josquin13 View Post
    Though he wasn't a "romantic or neo-romantic" composer, Sweden can claim a 1st tier symphonic composer in Joseph Martin Kraus (1756-1792), sometimes called the "Swedish Mozart". No less than F.J. Haydn said of Kraus: "Kraus was the first man of genius that I met. Why did he have to die? It is an irreparable loss for our art. The Symphony in C minor he wrote in Vienna specially for me is a work which will be considered a masterpiece in every century." (Kraus is also sometimes referred to as "the greatest composer nobody's ever heard of...")



    In addition, I would (wholeheartedly) consider Allan Pettersson's 7th Symphony to be a masterpiece (yes, Robert warned you...), but you have to hear it conducted by Sergiu Comissiona (& go into it with the expectation that, like Bruckner, Pettersson takes a long time to say what's on his mind). Here's the last 30 minutes of Pettersson's 7th:



    and the full symphony:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxQy...&frags=pl%2Cwn

    (Btw, Leif Segerstam conducts Pettersson's music very well too.)

    However, Pettersson himself believed that his 4th Symphony was his finest work:



    Other than that, in addition to the symphonies already mentioned above by Berwald, Stenhammar, Alfven, & Atterberg, I would add the symphonies of Swedish composer, Erland von Koch:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jxJDmwXKfM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sKJ...&frags=pl%2Cwn

    etc.

    But why do you have to limit yourself to Sweden? I'm personally more drawn to the Finnish and Danish symphonic composers myself. So, if you're open to crossing borders, in addition to Sibelius's 2nd, 4th, 5th, & 7th, I'd recommend that you explore the symphonies of Carl Nielsen (Danish) & Leevi Madetoja (Finnish), and the underrated symphonic composers--Fartein Valen (Norwegian), Vagn Holmboe (Danish), Joonas Kokkonen (Finnish), & Einojohani Rautavaara (Finnish). If you're open to more modern composers--that is, contemporary composers that have partly or entirely turned away from the Romantic idiom, the symphonies of Per Nørgard (Danish), Paavo Heininen (Finnish), Kalevi Aho (Finnish), Poul Ruders (Danish), & Ib Nørholm (Danish) are (or may be) worth exploring.

    Leevi Madetoja: Symphony No. 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jz27RKPF8eY

    Fartein Valen: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWd_...&frags=pl%2Cwn

    Vagn Holmboe: Symphonies Nos. 5 and 8, "Sinfonia boreale":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYCN...&frags=pl%2Cwn

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZHg...&frags=pl%2Cwn
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXTM...&frags=pl%2Cwn
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZN3p...&frags=pl%2Cwn
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGti...&frags=pl%2Cwn

    Joonas Kokkonen: Symphony Nos. 3 & 4:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkPX...&frags=pl%2Cwn
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGXA...&frags=pl%2Cwn

    Einojuhani Rautavaara: Symphonies Nos. 5 & 8 "The Journey":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a159...&frags=pl%2Cwn
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxqD...&frags=pl%2Cwn

    Per Nørgard: Symphonies Nos. 3 and 6, "At the end of the day":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY0F...&frags=pl%2Cwn
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxTk...&frags=pl%2Cwn

    Paavo Heininen Symphony No. 5: Heininen has composed 6 symphonies so far, but I can't find any of them on You Tube.

    The symphonies of Danish composer Rued Langgaard (1893-1952) may also be of interest. I only know his "Music of the Spheres" or "Sfaerernes musik", & have yet to get to the symphonies. So I can't be of any help (although you can probably find some of his symphonies on You Tube, if interested).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REqF...&frags=pl%2Cwn
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2xcMoQ6ML4

    There's also the Finnish composer Sven Einar Englund, who wrote 7 symphonies. Englund was a native Swedish speaker, so maybe he counts...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETZX...&frags=pl%2Cwn
    Exceptional post, of highest quality. I learned a lot tonight. Thanks!
    Geheimnisvoll sie nahen die Lüfte, fraglos gebe ihrem Zauber ich mich hin.

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  13. #22
    Member Dimace's Avatar
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    As a small contribution to this wonderful and very educational (for me at least) threat, a quite rare cd from Finland. (from my collection)

    Sibelius.jpg
    Geheimnisvoll sie nahen die Lüfte, fraglos gebe ihrem Zauber ich mich hin.

  14. #23
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    This looks great. I hope I can find it in CD : ). Thanks for sharing. Signed your favorite Sibelius addict.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dimace View Post
    As a small contribution to this wonderful and very educational (for me at least) threat, a quite rare cd from Finland. (from my collection)

    Sibelius.jpg

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