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Thread: 20th Century Classical Music - One Tune A Day

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    Default 20th Century Classical Music - One Tune A Day

    Atonal, dodecaphonic, and serial compositions - One Tune A Day -

    September 10th...


    Béla Bartók - "Eight Improvisations on Hungarian Peasant Songs" - Jenő Jandó

    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Sep-10-2018 at 16:15.

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    Atonal, dodecaphonic, and serial compositions - One Tune A Day -

    September 11th...


    Alban Berg - "Kammerkonzert (1/3)" - (1925) -



    Wolfgang Marschner, violino; Paul Jacobs, pianoforte -- Köln Radio Symphony Orchestra directed by Hermann Scherchen (Colonia 2.III.1959)
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Sep-10-2018 at 16:23.

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    Atonal, dodecaphonic, and serial compositions - One Tune A Day -

    September 12th...

    Tadeusz Baird - "Canzona for orchestra" - (1981) -



    Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra, Warsaw directed by Jan Krenz.
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Sep-10-2018 at 16:23.

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    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
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    did I read it correctly? Did you really write one tune a day?

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    I'm fairly certain the Bartok you linked to is neither atonal, dodecaphonic, or serial. I'm not aware that Bartok ever used any of those compositional techniques.

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    Senior Member arpeggio's Avatar
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    Karol Husa Prague 1968




    Many great performances on You Tube. Above one of the better live one.
    It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. And I am a very ingenious fellow

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperTonic View Post
    I'm fairly certain the Bartok you linked to is neither atonal, dodecaphonic, or serial. I'm not aware that Bartok ever used any of those compositional techniques.
    OK polytonal, bitonal and pentatonic sometimes bitonal and pentatonic at the same time.. It's also atonal because it lacks a tonal centre. It's not atonal as in early (pre-twelve tone) Second Viennese school .
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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    It's certainly not diatonic. It lies somewhere in that huge, expansive, ambiguous region of music of "free harmonic relations." That's an area where we have left diatonic scales, and notes begin to have relationships to each other in terms of sonorities which float freely. Sometimes they are centric, momentarily, but often rotate out of that, into another orbit. I don't call it "atonal" or "free atonal" because it isn't chromatic enough. Sometimes this kind of quasi-tonal music will deal with one particular aspect of harmony, such as a division of the octave into 3 or 4 equal parts, giving whole-tone and diminished sounds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperTonic View Post
    I'm fairly certain the Bartok you linked to is neither atonal, dodecaphonic, or serial. I'm not aware that Bartok ever used any of those compositional techniques.
    "The first movement, Molto moderato, the original melody is repeated three times without not much variation and a coda at the end. The mode of this melody comes from the Dorian mode scale on C, but the accompaniment plays unrelated triad chords, all of them derived from melody notes.

    In the second movement, Molto capriccioso, the main melody is repeated also three times, but here, even though it shares its Dorian mode on C, there are fragments written in Mixolydian mode, its rhythm is much more syncopated, there are much more sudden tempo changes and it is much more dissonant than the first.

    The third movement, Lento rubato, is polytonal.

    The fourth, Allegretto scherzando, is a very quick scherzo-like movement.

    The fifth movement, Allegro molto, uses the pentatonic scale and also counterpoint and polytonal harmonies all along the movement.

    The sixth movement, Allegro moderato, molto capriccioso, is a bitonal movement; one hand plays only in the black keys of the piano, making a melody on a pentatonic scale, while the other hand uses all of the white keys, which create dissonances.

    The seventh movement, Sostenuto, rubato, is dedicated to the memory of French composer Claude Debussy, for Bartók's music was very influenced by Debussy's style when Bartók was a young composer. It was published separately from this work in a memorial supplement of La revue musicale, published in December 1920 and dedicated to late Debussy, even though this movement contains no references to any of Debussy's works nor to his composition style.

    The eighth movement, Allegro, is in a variation form, and its melody is repeated over and over, like in the first movement. The melody is somehow similar to that of the second movement."

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight_..._Peasant_Songs
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Sep-10-2018 at 20:33.

  16. #10
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    Better lay down some definitions... and perhaps put in an order for lawyers, guns, and money...

    Atonality -

    Atonality in its broadest sense is music that lacks a tonal center, or key.

    Atonality, in this sense, usually describes compositions written from about 1908 to the present day where a hierarchy of pitches focusing on a single, central tone is not used, and the notes of the chromatic scale function independently of one another.

    More narrowly, the term atonality describes music that does not conform to the system of tonal hierarchies that characterized classical European music between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries . The repertory of atonal music is characterized by the occurrence of pitches in novel combinations, as well as by the occurrence of familiar pitch combinations in unfamiliar environments.

    More narrowly still, the term is sometimes used to describe music that is neither tonal nor serial, especially the pre-twelve-tone music of the Second Viennese School, principally Alban Berg, Arnold Schoenberg, and Anton Webern. However, "[a]s a categorical label, 'atonal' generally means only that the piece is in the Western tradition and is not 'tonal'", although there are longer periods, e.g., medieval, renaissance, and modern modal musics to which this definition does not apply.

    Serialism arose partly as a means of organizing more coherently the relations used in the pre-serial 'free atonal' music. Thus many useful and crucial insights about even strictly serial music depend only on such basic atonal theory.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atonality

    Twelve-tone technique

    Twelve-tone technique—also known as dodecaphony, twelve-tone serialism, and (in British usage) twelve-note composition—is a method of musical composition devised by Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg (1874–1951) and associated with the "Second Viennese School" composers, who were the primary users of the technique in the first decades of its existence.

    The technique is a means of ensuring that all 12 notes of the chromatic scale are sounded as often as one another in a piece of music while preventing the emphasis of any one note through the use of tone rows, orderings of the 12 pitch classes. All 12 notes are thus given more or less equal importance, and the music avoids being in a key.

    Over time, the technique increased greatly in popularity and eventually became widely influential on 20th-century composers. Schoenberg himself described the system as a "Method of composing with twelve tones which are related only with one another". It is commonly considered a form of serialism.

    Schoenberg's countryman and contemporary Josef Matthias Hauer also developed a similar system using unordered hexachords or tropes—but with no connection to Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique. Other composers have created systematic use of the chromatic scale, but Schoenberg's method is considered to be historically and aesthetically most significant.

    In practice, the "rules" of twelve-tone technique have been bent and broken many times, not least by Schoenberg himself. For instance, in some pieces two or more tone rows may be heard progressing at once, or there may be parts of a composition which are written freely, without recourse to the twelve-tone technique at all.

    Offshoots or variations may produce music in which:
    - the full chromatic is used and constantly circulates, but permutational devices are ignored
    - permutational devices are used but not on the full chromatic

    Also, some composers, including Stravinsky, have used cyclic permutation, or rotation, where the row is taken in order but using a different starting note. Stravinsky also preferred the inverse-retrograde, rather than the retrograde-inverse, treating the former as the compositionally predominant, "untransposed" form.

    Although usually atonal, twelve tone music need not be—several pieces by Berg, for instance, have tonal elements.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve-tone_technique

    Serialism

    In music, serialism is a method of composition using series of pitches, rhythms, dynamics, timbres or other musical elements. Serialism began primarily with Arnold Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique, though some of his contemporaries were also working to establish serialism as a form of post-tonal thinking.

    Twelve-tone technique orders the twelve notes of the chromatic scale, forming a row or series and providing a unifying basis for a composition's melody, harmony, structural progressions, and variations. Other types of serialism also work with sets, collections of objects, but not necessarily with fixed-order series, and extend the technique to other musical dimensions (often called "parameters"), such as duration, dynamics, and timbre.

    Serialism is not by itself a system of composition, nor is it a style. Neither is pitch serialism necessarily incompatible with tonality, though it is most often used as a means of composing atonal music.

    "Serial music" is a problematic term because it is used differently in different languages and especially because, shortly after its coinage in French, it underwent essential alterations during its transmission to German.

    Twelve-tone serialism - Serialism of the first type is most specifically defined as the structural principle according to which a recurring series of ordered elements (normally a set—or row—of pitches or pitch classes) are used in order or manipulated in particular ways to give a piece unity.

    Serialism is often broadly applied to all music written in what Arnold Schoenberg called "The Method of Composing with Twelve Notes related only to one another", or dodecaphony, and methods that evolved from his methods.

    It is sometimes used more specifically to apply only to music where at least one element other than pitch is subjected to being treated as a row or series. In such usages post-Webernian serialism will be used to denote works that extend serial techniques to other elements of music. Other terms used to make the distinction are twelve-note serialism for the former and integral serialism for the latter.

    Non-twelve-tone serialism - The series is not an order of succession, but indeed a hierarchy—which may be independent of this order of succession.

    Rules of analysis derived from twelve-tone theory do not apply to serialism of the second type: "in particular the ideas, one, that the series is an intervallic sequence, and two, that the rules are consistent".

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serialism

    Got all that? Okay... we now return you to our regularly scheduled thread...

    "Atonality, dodecaphonic, and serial compositions" - One Tune A Day...

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    Senior Member Torkelburger's Avatar
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    September 10
    12-tone technique:


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    Senior Member Tallisman's Avatar
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    One "tune" a day? Shall we start with this charming ditty from Webern? Or a Boulez jingle?

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    Atonal, dodecaphonic, and serial compositions - One Tune A Day -

    September 13th...

    John J. Becker - "Concerto Arabesque" - (1930)


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    Quote Originally Posted by Tallisman View Post
    One "tune" a day? Shall we start with this charming ditty from Webern? Or a Boulez jingle?
    Note to self: Use irony judiciously...

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    Atonal, dodecaphonic, and serial compositions - One Tune A Day -

    September 14th...

    Hanns Eisler: "Palmström" - (1926)



    Mitglieder der Orchester-Academie Berlin
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Sep-11-2018 at 19:53.

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