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Thread: Atrocious Violin Playing

  1. #16
    Senior Member brianvds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    There is a saying in bluegrass music; when you listen to it, you are listening to the man as much as the music. Consider this when listening to so-called 'folk' or 'primitive' music. Have a modicum of respect, and remember that music is an expression of one's being.
    I think it's bad form to present music simply to ridicule it, or denigrate it. There is something to be learned from all music, no matter what form it is in.
    It's to some extent dependent on genre. With bluegrass, that slightly off-key sound is very much a part of the style, and part of its charm. I'd go as far as to say with bluegrass, you have to play it like that. Play a Mozart violin concerto like that, and it will be unlistenable.

  2. #17
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    My vote goes to Ilya Gringolts.



    Compare the playing in that recording with that of your favorite violinist, say Perlman or Bell or Shaham (all of which can be heard on youtube vids). I'm not surprised that Gringolts seems to be hiding behind his instrument in the cover photo of the album. I'd probably want to hide too if I were a professional who played like that. What did poor Sibelius ever do to Gringolts to deserve such a performance?

    I actually purchased this recording after hearing it on a radio broadcast because I couldn't believe what I was hearing. I wanted a "comparison" disc for my collection to illustrate what the Sibelius concerto should not sound like.

    I can take Bluegrass fiddlin', Celtic or Swedish folk fiddling, or Boyd Tinsley. Even beginner violinists at their elementary school recitals. That level of playing is certainly forgivable, especially if one of the performers is one's granddaughter. (Ok, I'll admit that the sound from Miss Mississippi 2016 is rather unforgivable! Probably would be even if she were my granddaughter!) But what I really can't take is Ilya Gringolts.

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  4. #18
    Senior Member Gordontrek's Avatar
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    They're both better than me

  5. #19
    Senior Member Tallisman's Avatar
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    He's clearly trained in the fiddle tradition, not classical. Not the greatest fiddle player too, but not atrocious. I've heard much, MUCH worse (e.g Miss Mississippi just now, thanks very much for that mbhaub)

  6. #20
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SONNET CLV View Post
    My vote goes to Ilya Gringolts.



    Compare the playing in that recording with that of your favorite violinist, say Perlman or Bell or Shaham (all of which can be heard on youtube vids). I'm not surprised that Gringolts seems to be hiding behind his instrument in the cover photo of the album. I'd probably want to hide too if I were a professional who played like that. What did poor Sibelius ever do to Gringolts to deserve such a performance?

    I actually purchased this recording after hearing it on a radio broadcast because I couldn't believe what I was hearing. I wanted a "comparison" disc for my collection to illustrate what the Sibelius concerto should not sound like.
    This must be the most stupefyingly dull and meaningless performance of anything I've ever heard. Any real musician would make it more interesting sight-reading it for the first time. You've done us a service here: we can all now safely avoid any recordings by Ilya Gringolts.

    POSTSCRIPT: A review on Amazon says he was "only" 21 when he recorded this.
    Last edited by Woodduck; Sep-19-2018 at 16:58.

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  8. #21
    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordontrek View Post
    They're both better than me
    No video proof, please, I beg you . . .

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  10. #22
    Senior Member stomanek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manxfeeder View Post
    I agree with that. Music doesn't have to be technically perfect to be good. I have always called it being honest, but I suppose "essence' is a better description.
    Im not one to poo poo a performance because the violinist screws up one spicato - Ive seen Ricci on a youtbve video mess up one or two moments in what is otherwise spellbinding playing.

  11. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manxfeeder View Post
    I agree with that. Music doesn't have to be technically perfect to be good. I have always called it being honest, but I suppose "essence' is a better description.
    Quote Originally Posted by stomanek View Post
    Im not one to poo poo a performance because the violinist screws up one spicato - Ive seen Ricci on a youtbve video mess up one or two moments in what is otherwise spellbinding playing.
    If music is indeed an imitation of life, of humanness itself (to abstract Aristotle from his Poetics), then humanness, with its included flaws, must remain a part of it. Human music is flawed, yes, but also warm and real. Machine generated music (which is likely to get each beat in perfect rhythm, each note in perfect frequency, each timbre with a perfect sameness) must be cold and surreal. Critics often point out the mechanical features of certain players who seem to be "perfect" but lack that something we term "humanness" in their performances. (I've read such comments about Heifetz and Lang Lang, to name two. And many of us remain non-fans of Karajan's digital performances because, can we say, they are too mechanical?)

    I don't mind rough edges on music that is otherwise played with insight, depth, and meaning ... and affection. Which is why I often champion lesser known, smaller orchestras and less familiar but competent and dedicated conductors for the Beethoven symphonies. Beethoven the way Beethoven himself may have heard the music, not played by highly skilled, modern, conservative trained musicians on the most exacting of instruments, but rather fleshed out by players with late 18th century training and instruments that cannot rival our modern-day "improvements".

    Of course, incompetence is still incompetence, and will maintain music being unlistenable. But lack of perfection where truth is sincerely (or even ironically) sought cannot be a totally awful thing.

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  13. #24
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tallisman View Post
    He's clearly trained in the fiddle tradition, not classical. Not the greatest fiddle player too, but not atrocious. I've heard much, MUCH worse (e.g Miss Mississippi just now, thanks very much for that mbhaub)
    He was Classically trained, in fact.

  14. #25
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SONNET CLV View Post
    If music is indeed an imitation of life, of humanness itself (to abstract Aristotle from his Poetics), then humanness, with its included flaws, must remain a part of it. Human music is flawed, yes, but also warm and real. Machine generated music (which is likely to get each beat in perfect rhythm, each note in perfect frequency, each timbre with a perfect sameness) must be cold and surreal. Critics often point out the mechanical features of certain players who seem to be "perfect" but lack that something we term "humanness" in their performances. (I've read such comments about Heifetz and Lang Lang, to name two. And many of us remain non-fans of Karajan's digital performances because, can we say, they are too mechanical?)

    I don't mind rough edges on music that is otherwise played with insight, depth, and meaning ... and affection. Which is why I often champion lesser known, smaller orchestras and less familiar but competent and dedicated conductors for the Beethoven symphonies. Beethoven the way Beethoven himself may have heard the music, not played by highly skilled, modern, conservative trained musicians on the most exacting of instruments, but rather fleshed out by players with late 18th century training and instruments that cannot rival our modern-day "improvements".

    Of course, incompetence is still incompetence, and will maintain music being unlistenable. But lack of perfection where truth is sincerely (or even ironically) sought cannot be a totally awful thing.
    That's all fine, but the main thing is as a listener it to decide if you like it or dislike it and to derive the reasons why. I see nothing wrong with posting why you dislike something as someone mentioned above.
    Last edited by Captainnumber36; Sep-22-2018 at 01:31.

  15. #26
    Senior Member Larkenfield's Avatar
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    For fun not condemnation. “Mah... MAH... MAH!”

    Last edited by Larkenfield; Sep-22-2018 at 01:49.
    ”Art is how we decorate space; Music is how we decorate time.”

  16. #27
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Try this instead.



    Quote Originally Posted by Logos View Post
    She just needed a little more rosin on the violin, that's all.
    Rosin brings one of my favorite songs to mind.

    Last edited by jegreenwood; Sep-22-2018 at 15:03.

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  18. #28
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    Of course, there's always this player, too:



    Fortunately he has that Strad to keep him in tune.

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  20. #29
    Senior Member stomanek's Avatar
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    Bear in mind a pianist of similar skill to a lot of these scrapy violinists will sound quite reasonable.

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