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Thread: Any idea what this instrument is?

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    Default Any idea what this instrument is?

    Screen Shot 2018-10-05 at 20.14.25.jpg
    Hi,
    Any idea what this instrument is, or whether you can buy one or something similar? An orchestra I'm in are playing a similar piece, and wanted this kind of effect.

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    It looks to me like several instruments glued together.

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Looks to me like a Turkish Crescent.

    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

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    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by apeach7890 View Post
    Screen Shot 2018-10-05 at 20.14.25.jpg
    Hi,
    Any idea what this instrument is, or whether you can buy one or something similar? An orchestra I'm in are playing a similar piece, and wanted this kind of effect.
    I have no idea but no doubt someone will sit it on a stage, throw a violin bow or a stick at it and then label it as a symphony.

  6. #5
    Sydney Nova Scotia
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    Looks to me like a Turkish Crescent.

    EG is right - it's a Turkish Crescent -

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_crescent

    A Turkish crescent, (also cevgen (Tr.), Turkish jingle, Jingling Johnny, Schellenbaum (Ger.), chapeau chinois or pavillon chinois (Fr.), chaghana[1]) is a percussion instrument traditionally used by military bands. In some contexts it also serves as a battle trophy or object of veneration.

    Use in specific musical works -

    The Turkish crescent figures prominently in the Marche pour la Cérémonie des Turcs, part of Jean-Baptiste Lully's music for Molière's comédie-ballet Le Bourgeois gentilhomme (1670).

    It was used by the composer Joseph Haydn in his Symphony No. 100 (1794).

    Beethoven is said to have made use of the Jingling Johnny or Turkish crescent in the finale to his Ninth Symphony, though it is not specified in the score.

    Hector Berlioz used it in his massive piece for military wind band with optional choir and organ Grande symphonie funèbre et triomphale (1840). His "dream ensemble" of 467 instrumentalists included four pavillons chinois among its 53 percussion instruments.[ He said about the instrument: "The Pavillon Chinois, with its numerous little bells, serves to give brilliancy to lively pieces, and pompous marches in military music. It can only shake its sonorous locks, at somewhat lengthened intervals; that is to say, about twice in a bar, in a movement of moderate time".

    John Philip Sousa's Nobles of the Mystic Shrine (1923) also called for the use of the Turkish crescent.

    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Oct-12-2018 at 19:42.

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    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    I was thinking that he might serve Espresso from it.

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