Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Didgeridoo Meets Orchestra

  1. #1
    Senior Member brianvds's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Centurion, South Africa
    Posts
    2,330
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Didgeridoo Meets Orchestra

    Now this is really something else... :-)


  2. Likes arpeggio, Sid James liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member CnC Bartok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Oxford-ish
    Posts
    626
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Peter Sculthorpe's Earth Cry, I assume?

    I don't know of any other "didgeridoo concertos"......

  4. #3
    Senior Member shirime's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,791
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yeah that's Earth Cry with William Barton, a Wannyi, Lardil and Kalkadunga elder and contemporary didjeridu player.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kampen (NL)
    Posts
    12,869
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Pickett View Post
    Peter Sculthorpe's Earth Cry, I assume?

    I don't know of any other "didgeridoo concertos"......
    Sean O'Boyle composed a real concerto for the instrument. It's interesting, but I prefer Sculthorpe's concertante work.
    Und Morgen wird die Sonne wieder scheinen......

  6. #5
    Senior Member shirime's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,791
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Matthew Hindson wrote a work for William Barton and an orchestra called Kalkadungu


  7. Likes arpeggio liked this post
  8. #6
    Senior Member LezLee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Falkirk, Scotland
    Posts
    1,750
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Philip Glass had a go as well of course:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Voices-Didg...***+didgeridoo

    Many years ago there was a didgeridoo busker in Sheffield city centre. Not unpleasant.
    Last edited by LezLee; Oct-12-2018 at 12:01.

  9. #7
    Senior Member brianvds's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Centurion, South Africa
    Posts
    2,330
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I wonder how on earth you notate didgeridoo music...

    Quote Originally Posted by LezLee View Post
    Philip Glass had a go as well of course:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Voices-Didg...***+didgeridoo

    Many years ago there was a didgeridoo busker in Sheffield city centre. Not unpleasant.
    I very much like the sound of the didgeridoo. I tend to be old-fashioned in my tastes and thus I mostly prefer music with a good tune. But if we're going to do soundscapes, there is hardly an instrument better suited to it than didgeridoo, in my ever so humble opinion. :-)

  10. Likes shirime liked this post
  11. #8
    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    3,054
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brianvds View Post
    I wonder how on earth you notate didgeridoo music...
    on the score there's the indication: "blow!"
    What time is the next swan?

  12. Likes brianvds liked this post
  13. #9
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    9,558
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Peter Sculthorpe met William Barton after composing pieces like Earth Cry, but adding the didgeridoo was an entirely logical outcome. As far back as the 1960's, Sculthorpe was incorporating drones into his music. He said that drones had a direct parallel with the flatness of the Australian landscape, as well as the sounds of nature. At that time, Aboriginal culture and language was not valued by the white majority. It was judged to be primitive, something destined to die out in the face of progress.

    Sculthorpe heard archival recordings of tribal music, and Djilile is a piece which directly quotes a song from Northern Australia. On the whole, like Bartok, Sculthorpe tended to absorb characteristics of the music into his own rather than quote it. Sculthorpe also had an interest in music of Indonesia and Japan, extensively travelling in these countries, and he programmed and taught the first course in Australia to cover non-Western (chiefly Asian) music.

    There's an anecdote in Sculthorpe's autobiography which relates to all this. An orchestra visited a remote area of the Northern Territory and performed Kakadu amongst other things. After the concert, the local Aboriginal people where most complimentary about Sculthorpe's piece, saying that in it he captured the spirit of their music perfectly. They had not heard an orchestra perform before, and Sculthorpe thought this to be the highest praise he could receive.
    Last edited by Sid James; Oct-17-2018 at 00:34.

  14. Likes shirime, brianvds liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •