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Thread: We dont know when we die but we live like we wont die. Is it not strange?

  1. #31
    Senior Member shirime's Avatar
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    When we die, won't our brains basically just be shutting off? As far as I know, I won't be able to feel anything after I die so death itself won't be much of a problem for me. I won't be alive to miss people I lived with. Sounds pretty painless to me, although I am not in any rush to get there. It'll come when it comes and I'll just do my best to enjoy life for what it is, making living something pleasurable for me and the people around me. That's kind of the point, isn't it?

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  3. #32
    Moderator Huilunsoittaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aleazk View Post
    To be honest, I'm more afraid of life and the multitude of sufferings of the most varied and imaginative kinds that it's capable of bringing to a living being, some of which I have already seen, others experienced myself and some others probably which I'm yet to see and experience. The ones that don't kill you are actually the ones I fear, death just kills you and it's simply over.
    This. I fear pain, and a painful death would be quite bad, but if it wasn't painful I would be okay. It's the suffering of life that is really hard to go through, and for some, it's enough to have thoughts of suicide. It's also interesting how death inspires more death in the sense that a death of someone you love may be the ultimate pain in life, enough to make you want to die as well. It's contagious.


    As financial advisor, I've had these kinds of dark conversations with clients, especially to do with life insurance. Earlier this summer, I saw my first death certificate from someone filing a death claim, and it made me feel sick inside to look at it. I was looking at a life set in stone. All of us who are still alive, the ending hasn't yet been written. We still have a chance to do something different in our lives, to be different people. But for that guy, his ending was written. Set in stone. The end. No going back. *shudders*
    Last edited by Huilunsoittaja; Oct-19-2018 at 17:55.
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  5. #33
    Senior Member aleazk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shirime View Post
    When we die, won't our brains basically just be shutting off? As far as I know, I won't be able to feel anything after I die so death itself won't be much of a problem for me. I won't be alive to miss people I lived with. Sounds pretty painless to me, although I am not in any rush to get there. It'll come when it comes and I'll just do my best to enjoy life for what it is, making living something pleasurable for me and the people around me. That's kind of the point, isn't it?
    The brain gets completely destroyed, not merely 'shut off'

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  7. #34
    Senior Member Couchie's Avatar
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    If you actually take time to think about immortality and the doom of what living forever without any possible escape would entail, the thought of death is relaxing and comforting. Without death, life would not be life. It would merely be a directionless state of existing. The passing of time could not be ascertained. Without a conception of time, causes would not have effects, but merely be a juxtaposition of phenomena towards no end. Purpose could therefore not exist. So let's be thankful for death. Death does not deprive life of meaning, but is what *gives* life meaning.
    Doch dieses Wörtlein: und, -wär' es zerstört,
    wie anders als mit Isoldes eignem Leben wär' Tristan der Tod gegeben?

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  9. #35
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Couchie View Post
    If you actually take time to think about immortality and the doom of what living forever without any possible escape would entail, the thought of death is relaxing and comforting. Without death, life would not be life. It would merely be a directionless state of existing. The passing of time could not be ascertained. Without a conception of time, causes would not have effects, but merely be a juxtaposition of phenomena towards no end. Purpose could therefore not exist. So let's be thankful for death. Death does not deprive life of meaning, but is what *gives* life meaning.

    According to the biological view, lifespans and preprogrammed death for individuals was invented by the evolutionary process about 800 million years ago.

    It offered a clear advantage for all the species which descended from the earliest, lucky population. There are very few lines of descent today which did okay, in the extreme competition for survival, without it. And so, most all later descendants retained the survival advantage of limited and prescribed life spans. Each genera then evolved a lifespan that was adequately advantageous for survival for their particular lifestyle and etc.

    You can look up the Grandmother Theory to see a reasoning as to why our human lifespans are quite exceptional.
    Tradition is not the worship of ashes - but the preservation of fire!
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  11. #36
    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
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    Death, the great equalizer!
    "All of Italian opera can be heard in [Bellini's] "Ah! non creda [mirarti]."
    --Renata Scotto in "Scotto, More Than a DIva."

  12. #37
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    From the late great James Thurber. I saw this as a kid and it gave me pause even then.



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  14. #38
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Another, unrelated to the thread topic (I think).



  15. #39
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Another, unrelated to the thread topic (I think).

    I don't get it. What is the little guy doing?
    Tradition is not the worship of ashes - but the preservation of fire!
    Gustav Mahler

  16. #40
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luchesi View Post
    I don't get it. What is the little guy doing?
    Thurber was big on the battle of the sexes. It's something we don't talk about much any more.


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  18. #41
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Thurber was big on the battle of the sexes. It's something we don't talk about much any more.
    Okay, a kinda living death for the little husband..

    from wiki

    When Thurber was seven years old, he and one of his brothers were playing a game of William Tell, when his brother shot James in the eye with an arrow.[2] He lost that eye, and the injury later caused him to become almost entirely blind. He was unable to participate in sports and other activities in his childhood because of this injury, but he developed a creative mind which he used to express himself in writings.
    Tradition is not the worship of ashes - but the preservation of fire!
    Gustav Mahler

  19. #42
    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luchesi View Post
    I don't get it. What is the little guy doing?
    Thinking, "should I go in the house or crawl under the porch."
    "All of Italian opera can be heard in [Bellini's] "Ah! non creda [mirarti]."
    --Renata Scotto in "Scotto, More Than a DIva."

  20. #43
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fritz Kobus View Post
    Thinking, "should I go in the house or crawl under the porch."
    Porch is another funny word in English.

    Middle English: from Old French porche, from Latin porticus ‘colonnade’, from porta ‘passage’.

    added ... but Beethoven is "beet yard"
    Last edited by Luchesi; Oct-23-2018 at 06:17.
    Tradition is not the worship of ashes - but the preservation of fire!
    Gustav Mahler

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