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Thread: Gripe of the Day thread.

  1. #1246
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoCoPilot View Post
    My understanding -- caveat, I'm not a doctor -- is that the virus is shed during the initial infection period when your lungs are filling up with virus and you cough out droplets.

    After you've had the virus long enough to develop antibodies, or you've gotten the vaccine and thus developed antibodies, the virus will not be replicating. Your body will attack and destroy any virus inside your body before it can spread (the antibodies are not contagious).

    So-called 'herd immunity' is something of a misnomer, and widely misunderstood. It doesn't mean ANYBODY is immune. It simply means the virus won't find enough virgin hosts to spread like wildfire anymore.

    It's like a burned-out patch of forest. If one tree remains standing, it's still flammable -- but the chance of a wildfire coming over the hill is minimized if all the fuel is already burned.

    Get two virgin trees together -- have a party of unvaccinated people -- go to an antivax convention.... all bets are off.
    Thanks. We know that our immune system gets carried away in some unlucky people and will sadly become damaging to the body. There must be a lower limit of numbers of the invader which is reached when it’s mostly eliminated. I mean, immune systems need a mechanism by which this zealousness doesn't happen often. It probably appeared in the evolutionary tree long, long ago. Every recent animal group would need this ‘brake’. So the result would be some virus hides or goes dormant (undetectable?) like the chickenpox virus, waiting for a weakening response or the old age slide.
    Albert Einstein, "I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.

  2. #1247
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Knox View Post
    Almost an immaculate conception! And in the 1955 Goldbergs there is this controlled energy, propulsion in perfect time. It goes beyond whether you like it, whether it's in good taste, whether it follows the dictates of historically informed performance! This is what his musician critics don't seem to get. Gould is a phenomenon, a singularity. Maybe "bio-astronomical science" will one day contribute some insights.
    It Is a gripe of mine that nusic lovers. and even some members of this forum, don't want eccentric performances in their record collection. I want every category of performance and interpretation. I think you've said that you feel the same way. I even want bad performances, for future comparisons. I wanted every new LP release by Gould as they came out, because they were so different. I needed to hear different approaches (of the Mozart sonatas especially since that's what I was practicing at the time). But far beyond practicing it's just so invigorating and transforming to hear something very new and something very ‘individual'.

    Added
    I'll say something controversial. I don't think that the composers knew all that they had in their scores. How could they? Pieces are composed by emotional feelings or by music theory or both, and neither approach is all-encompassing (comprehending).
    Last edited by Luchesi; Dec-18-2020 at 19:16.
    Albert Einstein, "I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.

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  4. #1248
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christabel View Post
    Western Australia has overnight imposed quarantine restrictions on people coming from New South Wales to Perth. That means my son from Perth cannot come for Christmas and we haven't seen him for 18 months. This is based on 18 cases - YES, 18 - of Covid-19 (no deaths, mind, just CASES) on the Sydney northern beaches. Western Australia represents at least a quarter of the Australian continental landmass and what we want to know is 'what's going to happen in winter when the case loads grow, as they inevitably will?" The answer lies in the next State election where Premier Mark McGowan knows he can control the people by instilling them with fear and then pretending he's 'saving' them. It's a winning ticket for him. My son cannot afford to return to Perth after Christmas and 'quarantine' for 14 days as he has to return to his mining sector job.

    We will have to watch our grandchildren grow via Zoom, since this won't end any time soon. The airlines in our country are going out of their minds with the ad hoc instantaneous decision-making and tenuous business models they now have. I would urge them to sue individual states and I think this will happen. My late father always said, "hit them in the bottom line and their hearts and minds will follow thereafter".

    Meanwhile, my lawyer daughter-in-law has spent the last months in her office 'certifying' documents for people who arrive in her office, thrown out of work by the airlines and desperate to get any work they can. These are desperate days and much of it can be described thus: POLITICS. The strategy in this country for Covid-19 is complete eradication.

    Infantile.
    Sorry you've been inconvenienced.

    Still, it's not as inconvenient as dying a horrid angonizing death gasping for air.

  5. #1249
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luchesi View Post
    It Is a gripe of mine that nusic lovers. and even some members of this forum, don't want eccentric performances in their record collection. I want every category of performance and interpretation. I think you've said that you feel the same way. I even want bad performances, for future comparisons. I wanted every new LP release by Gould as they came out, because they were so different. I needed to hear different approaches (of the Mozart sonatas especially since that's what I was practicing at the time). But far beyond practicing it's just so invigorating and transforming to hear something very new and something very ‘individual'.

    Added
    I'll say something controversial. I don't think that the composers knew all that they had in their scores. How could they? Pieces are composed by emotional feelings or by music theory or both, and neither approach is all-encompassing (comprehending).
    I agree about having a variety of recordings and back in the 1970's I sought out historical piano recordings that had very different interpretations of the same work. Back then I was a pianist, as you are, meaning that one would already know the work well enough that deviations would register and be interesting. Now I'm not such a collector, and I can see how someone who wants a basic library of recordings would go for a more standard performance.

    Also, back when Gould was very active there was a whole attitude of being open to new things in classical music. Doing Bach there were the Ward Swingle Singers, the Jacques Loussier Trio, Switched-On Bach, etc. But soon the ascendency of "authentic" (later "period," then "historically informed") performance took over. I loved playing Bach and Scarlatti, and became upset with some condescending academic saying, "Oh that's really harpsichord music" (stare), like, just give it up ... Now, things have changed again and harpsichord isn't in style. I mean, harpsichord and fortepiano are historical instruments, they'll never be mainstream.

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    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Not so much a gripe, but could be. I had to collect a urine sample from the dog today for the vet to analyze. So I am trying to put a little container under her rear end when she stoops. I sliipped in the snow while trying to position the container, spilling the sample. Had to do it over again.

    Perhaps more gripeable is the $370 vet bill (exam, two X rays--we did more than just the UTI stuff). They gave her a shot of antibiotic and the UTI seems to already have improved. No more blood in the urine and she is settled instead of constantly wanting to go out and then roaming the yard dribbling all the time. Oh, had to take 5 hours off work, but I have a lot of vacation time accrued, maybe 160 hours left.
    “The media’s the most powerful entity on Earth. They have the power to make the innocent look guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that’s power. Because they control the mind of the masses.”
    --Malcolm X

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  8. #1251
    Senior Member Bulldog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Knox View Post
    Also, back when Gould was very active there was a whole attitude of being open to new things in classical music. Doing Bach there were the Ward Swingle Singers, the Jacques Loussier Trio, Switched-On Bach, etc. But soon the ascendency of "authentic" (later "period," then "historically informed") performance took over. I loved playing Bach and Scarlatti, and became upset with some condescending academic saying, "Oh that's really harpsichord music" (stare), like, just give it up ... Now, things have changed again and harpsichord isn't in style. I mean, harpsichord and fortepiano are historical instruments, they'll never be mainstream.
    I have to disagree. The harpsichord is the mainstream instrument for baroque keyboard music.

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  10. #1252
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog View Post
    I have to disagree. The harpsichord is the mainstream instrument for baroque keyboard music.
    I'm pretty sure that many of the original members of the Swingle Singers formed the basis of the Monteverdi Choir. A friend was quite close to a soprano from the MC and he told me all about that back in the 1990s. It surprised me at the time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog View Post
    I have to disagree. The harpsichord is the mainstream instrument for baroque keyboard music.
    Yes, you are right concerning professional performance and recording. The "mainstream" I had in mind was the continuum of keyboard playing from beginning to advanced, which in my experience of piano playing and teaching was with Bach and Scarlatti on the piano; others added or switched to harpsichord at the intermediate to advanced levels. I don't dislike the harpsichord and fortepiano and my use of "historical" wasn't intended to be dismissive. But I just should have stopped at "I loved playing Bach and Scarlatti [on the piano]."

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  14. #1254
    Senior Member Varick's Avatar
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    The only reason why Baroque and early Classical composers wrote for the Harpsichord is because the amazing and more versatile piano hadn't been invented yet. I highly doubt (obviously there is no way to know) composers would have concentrated more for harpsichord composition if they access to the piano.

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    Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

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  16. #1255
    Senior Member Bulldog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varick View Post
    The only reason why Baroque and early Classical composers wrote for the Harpsichord is because the amazing and more versatile piano hadn't been invented yet. I highly doubt (obviously there is no way to know) composers would have concentrated more for harpsichord composition if they access to the piano.
    It's reasonable to assume that baroque keyboard works would have been different if the piano had been available. Better, worse? That's the unknown. Personally, I don't hear any improvements when Bach or other composers are performed on piano.

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  18. #1256
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    My gripe this morning: it's Sunday and I miss my choir. Participating in the service makes one part of an exalted whole, while singing in the choir offers a distinct place in that whole. It is a privilege actually. On Sunday morning the new week is set up and hope renewed. After 11 years I was taking a break from choir and that was OK for a while, but with the end of choir due to the COVID-19 pandemic, now I miss it. In the meantime there are contemplation and prayer, doing what I can to help others, looking after myself.

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  20. #1257
    Senior Member Bulldog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Knox View Post
    My gripe this morning: it's Sunday and I miss my choir. Participating in the service makes one part of an exalted whole, while singing in the choir offers a distinct place in that whole. It is a privilege actually. On Sunday morning the new week is set up and hope renewed. After 11 years I was taking a break from choir and that was OK for a while, but with the end of choir due to the COVID-19 pandemic, now I miss it. In the meantime there are contemplation and prayer, doing what I can to help others, looking after myself.
    Helping others is such a good thing to do. A few weeks ago, I was in a convenience store to buy some sugarless gum for my wife. In front of me at the counter was an elderly man who appeared a little distracted. After making his purchase, he left the store and went to his car. After I bought the gum, I noticed that his car was still in front of the store but he was in the middle of the street looking like a lost puppy.

    I ran into the street and got him back into his car. After talking to him for a couple of minutes, I asked him to give me his car keys which he did. I asked him if he had family in the area; he said yes and gave me a piece of paper with names and phone numbers on it. It turns out that his son's name and phone number was on the page. Not having a cell phone, I went back to the store and asked the cashier to call the son's number; I told his son where to find his dad. Within a few minutes, the son showed up by foot to drive his dad home; logistical problems were avoided.

    Not being a busy street, I doubt I saved anyone but felt great knowing that my new friend was safe at home.

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  22. #1258
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    The Government of Australia has one
    far-reaching bill submitted to
    online bullying, insulting and threatening
    Adults who do,
    risk a fine of up to 68,300 euros
    they should apologize.

    If parliament agrees, a
    regulator for online safety
    companies and platforms such as Facebook and
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    gross statements offline within 24 hours
    If they don't, they risk
    a fine of more than 300,000 euros.

    The Minister of Communications pointed it out
    that bullying can get so out of hand
    that victims commit suicide.
    Source: Australian government.

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    Senior Member Flamme's Avatar
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    The weirdest Christmas of them all...Nuff said.
    'Listen, Mister god!
    Isn't it boring
    to dip your puffy eyes,
    every day, into a jelly of clouds?'

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    Senior Member Dorsetmike's Avatar
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    So who defrosted the turkey breast, put it in the pan with trimmings then forgot to switch on, now looking at a much later dinner. (insert numerous expletives)
    I'm like my avatar .................. a local ruin

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