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Thread: Who wrote the best 9th symphony?

  1. #31
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Mahler, who else.
    Theatre, a forum for public debate, an arena for cathartic spectacle and somewhere for vain bitchy people to show off in front of big crowds!


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  3. #32
    Senior Member stomanek's Avatar
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    I would go for Schubert - then Dvorak - Mahler.

    Beethoven? It's a magnificent work but I cant bear the thought of listening to it.

    If you discount the immature works, Mozart's 9th (32, 33,34,35,36,38,39,40,41) should really be his last symphony so I will go for that - after all - what's in a number.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pyotr View Post
    Beethoven, Dvořák & Schubert for me, in that order.
    Switch Schubert and Dvorak and we’re the same person.

  5. #34
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    Bruckner's 9th is simply majestic. I still don't know whether we should rue the fact that he never got to finish it, or be grateful because it's just fine as it is and would most likely not have been improved by a 4th movement.

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  7. #35
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    Dvořák, followed by Beethoven, and then Bruckner.

  8. #36
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    1. Beethoven
    2. Schubert
    3. Dvorak

  9. #37
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    It is very difficult to answer this. Because everyone will do some kind of magics in their compositions of symphony 9. According to me Ludwig Van Beethoven has done an amazing symphony 9 during 1800. The composition is really mind blowing and it is regarded as one of the best achievement in the field of western music. One more thing about Beethoven is, he is a deaf but he was having the ability to captivate the minds of the listeners through his symphonies. Even now the most held stage performances of symphony 9 are of Beethoven's compositions.

  10. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonHolloway View Post
    It is very difficult to answer this. Because everyone will do some kind of magics in their compositions of symphony 9. According to me Ludwig Van Beethoven has done an amazing symphony 9 during 1800. The composition is really mind blowing and it is regarded as one of the best achievement in the field of western music. One more thing about Beethoven is, he is a deaf but he was having the ability to captivate the minds of the listeners through his symphonies. Even now the most held stage performances of symphony 9 are of Beethoven's compositions.
    I always have thought what is so great about Beethoven is *HE* is in his music. I have such an emotional reaction to his works. I can't explain it. When I listen to the 5th Piano Concerto, I feel such immense joy during the 1st and 3rd movements, yet I also feel the deepest sorrow I have ever felt during the 2nd movement, and I feel that every time. At first I thought it was just because I think it's the single most beautiful piece of music ever written, but that's not it - all classical music is beautiful. I find beauty in works I don't even like. I don't know what it is. I can't explain it. I feel so dorky saying that, but it's true and I just can't explain it. It makes me seriously wonder if there's something so deeply painful in my subconscious. Something that I am suppressing. Something that this music brings to the surface. Something that this music sets free.

    I feel the same about other pieces of Beethoven's music, although never to the depths of the second movement of the 5th Piano Concerto. In the 9th Symphony, I run between sadness and pure joy. The first movement of the 14th Piano Sonata moves me. Nothing, and I mean nothing, brings me more joy than the 4th movement of the 5th Symphony.

    Maybe it's because Beethoven poured his own life, his struggles, his sorrow, his agony and his joy into his music. I just love the guy so darn much.
    Last edited by gellio; Jan-05-2019 at 07:31.

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  12. #39
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    RVW's 9th is my favourite - I particularly like the way Previn conducts the slow movement.

  13. #40
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    1. Beethoven
    2. Dvorak


    I love Beethoven's 9th symphony because it is extensive(1.5 hours for 1 single performance) and has perhaps the best musical interpretation of joy there is. I also find it interesting how Beethoven is able to make a lot of sudden key shifts(like Dm -> Bb -> Dm -> Cm for example). It would sound extremely weird on the piano going from Dm to Cm with no bridging Gm harmony. But with the orchestral texture, it sounds all natural having these direct modulations. I find that these 3 symphonies of his are equally dramatic: Eroica, Victory(nickname for his 5th symphony), and 9th symphony but they all approach the drama in different ways.

    Dvorak's 9th symphony is so beautiful. It is also the symphony with the easiest piano transcription if you are talking about single movements. So much lyricism, recapitulation almost nonexistent in the first movement, 5 themes in a single movement, relatively little development. Dvorak's 9th and Beethoven's 5th are like on opposite sides of the spectrum when it comes to development and lyricism.

    Beethoven's 5th has a ton of development, even outside of the development section of the first movement. And the theme being developed is just 4 notes in a descending third, that famous Fate Motif. Very little lyricism even in the second movement. Dvorak's 9th on the other hand has just a little bit of development, long themes, and lots of themes and lyricism.

  14. #41
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Beethoven, Schubert, Bruckner, Dvorak, Mahler, RVW.....etc....

    I don't argue which is the best - I just enjoy them!

  15. #42
    Senior Member Pat Fairlea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Phillips View Post
    RVW's 9th is my favourite - I particularly like the way Previn conducts the slow movement.
    Yes. I'm glad someone has spoken up for this strange, lovely piece.

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  17. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    Which are the best, apples, kumquats or raspberries?

    Why does any one have to be better, they are very different works from different periods and with different compositional triggers.
    Apples, by far.

  18. #44
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Beethoven, Schubert, Bruckner, Dvorak, Mahler, RVW.....etc....

    I don't argue which is the best - I just enjoy them!
    There are a lot of good 9ths. I'll add Lajtha, and Panufnik.
    Short-term thinkers are rewarded with reelection, while those who dare to take seriously our responsibility to future generations commonly find themselves out of office.

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