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Thread: Stories that should be made into an opera

  1. #31
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    Why couldn't I have been one of those people? I guess if you're born in New Jersey the deck is stacked against you.
    Didn't do Bruce Springsteen or Frank Sinatra much harm being born there heh heh.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    You are a bit late on this one... "King Arthur, or The British Worthy, is a semi-opera in five acts with music by Henry Purcell and a libretto by John Dryden. It was first performed at the Queen's Theatre, Dorset Garden, London, in late May or early June 1691."

    If the net is spread a bit wider, Isaac Albeniz worked on a trilogy of Arthurian legend operas to a libretto by Francis Money-Coutts, 5th Baron Latymer. He finished the first, Merlin, which has been recorded, worked on the second Lancelot, but never finished it and never even started on the third Guinevere.
    I can think of two more:

    Le roi Arthus by Ernest Chausson, premiered in 1903.

    Przygoda Króla Artura, a radio opera by Grażyna Bacewicz from 1959. It was also apparently televised in 1960, though I don't know if it was staged, semi-staged, or just like a concert performance. There is a recording from 2014.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sieglinde View Post
    - Rashomon. I imagine it would be modernist music with lot of Japanese instruments (but the Bolero also has to be included, too iconic).
    Curious, this is the second subject (along with The House of Bernarda Alba) that Michael John LaChiusa has adapted into a musical. He wrote music, lyrics, and book for both. He also also written everything for a couple operas, and librettos for operas by a few other composers.

    Or, at least related. Rashomon was based on a short story by Ryūnosuke Akutagawa, "In a Grove." LaChiusa's See What I Wanna See was based on that plus two of his other short stories, "Kesa and Morito" and "The Dragon," and the setting is moved to New York's Central Park in 1951.

    I don't know Bernarda Alba well, but I really love See What I Wanna See. Both only had off-Broadway productions.



    Quote Originally Posted by Sieglinde View Post
    - Legend of Korra Book 1. Love triangles are more bearable when there's singing, Amon is THE quintessential bass villain, and there is a lot of drama. Plus both Korra and Lin Beifong could be contraltos.
    I'm on board for this. There's a lot of story to work with, but some very compelling opera could come from this.

  4. #34
    Senior Member BalalaikaBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sieglinde View Post
    - Gone with the Wind, but it would be extremely long. Also, Scarlett is a mezzo. Ashley is a useless lyric tenor. Rhett is a sexy baritone.
    this, but Rhett is more bass-baritone imo. more characters
    - Mammie: contralto
    - Melanie: coloratura soprano (or we could make her more of a tragic spinto/dramatic type, but she's more on the side so imo that fits less)
    - Mr. O'Hara: bass
    - Charles Hamilton: another useless lyric tenor...but written like a spinto tenor to simulate his trying to be dramatic/formidable
    - Bell: another mezzo

    alternatively we could write Scarlett as a coloratura soprano and make Melanie the mezzo, then give Scarlett a mad scene, but....nah. too conventional.

    PS: I love the odd parallelism between us: you are a lesbian who adores sexy low male voices and I'm a gay man who adores sexy low female voices
    Last edited by BalalaikaBoy; Today at 15:30.

  5. #35
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    The ill-fated Franklin expedition to find the North West Passage in 1845. I might baulk at any cannibalism scenes, though.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

  6. #36
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharkeysnight View Post
    I would enjoy an adaptation of Ionesco's The New Tenant in which the orchestration itself becomes gradually overstuffed.
    Trying to remember "The New Tenant." I do recall "The Chairs," which could work the same way. And "Exit the King" might work as well. I had an Ionesco phase many decades ago. For a brief period he was the second most often produced playwright in the world (after Shakespeare).

    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    Spike Milligan's and John Antrobus's play The Bedsitting Room. The post-apocalyptic absurdism of the story would suit numerous contemporary composers - I can envisage something in the manner of Ligeti's Le Grand Macabre or, if it was to err towards being a 'rock opera', Maxwell Davies's Resurrection. I reckon Gavin Bryars would be an ideal choice to have a crack at it.
    I saw the film adaptation, whose titles listed its cast in order of height.

    I'm surprised there's never been a proper opera of "Uncle Vanya." Wikipedia lists "Sonya's Story", which is told from her perspective. From a more comic perspective one could adapt "The Idiots Karamazov," from the play by Christopher Durang and Albert Innaurato, which includes the Three Sisters, Mary Tyrone Karamazov, and Constance Garnett (originally played by Meryl Streep).

    I'm looking forward to seeing what Missy Mazzoli does with "Lincoln in the Bardo."

  7. #37
    Junior Member sharkeysnight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    Trying to remember "The New Tenant." I do recall "The Chairs," which could work the same way. And "Exit the King" might work as well. I had an Ionesco phase many decades ago. For a brief period he was the second most often produced playwright in the world (after Shakespeare).
    It's fun, it's the one where a guy is moving into a new apartment and the moving men keep bringing furniture until not only are all the characters trapped in the room, but his incoming furniture has clogged the entire city.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Dorsetmike's Avatar
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    For a comic opera Trump's presidency?
    I'm like my avatar .................. a local ruin

  9. #39
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    Byrons poem about Manfred. There has been works composed about it so why not an opera?

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