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Thread: Chopin Cello Concerto in G Minor. Opus 65

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    Default Chopin Cello Concerto in G Minor. Opus 65

    Saw this performed at a local lunchtime recital today in Harrogate and now listening at home performed by Steven Isserlis and Denes Varjon.

    Quite often, the first movement is omitted as it is very complex although it was performed at recital and on this recording. I like it because it is quite a varied movement.
    Believe that it is the last published work of Chopins before he died, but correct me if I'm wrong

    Please change to sonata. Had concerto on mind and can't change it. Thank you
    Last edited by Judith; Nov-05-2018 at 18:32.

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    I find Chopin’s Op. 65 (Sonata rather than Concerto) to be a scrumptiously exquisite work—just gorgeous as high art: warm, tender, noble, elegant, melodically soaring, singing and full of heart. If only he had been blessed with at least five more years, what additional wonders he might have created...

    Last edited by Larkenfield; Nov-05-2018 at 18:25.
    ”Art is how we decorate space; Music is how we decorate time.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larkenfield View Post
    I find Chopin’s Op. 65 (Sonata rather than Concerto) to be a scrumptiously exquisite work—just gorgeous as high art: warm, tender, noble, elegant, melodically soaring, singing and full of heart. If only he had been blessed with at least five more years, what additional wonders he might have created...

    Sorry. Was meant to be sonata but couldn't change. Had concerto on my mind

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    Senior Member Ras's Avatar
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    I like Chopin's chamber music - there is also a piano trio. My favorite recording is the one originally released on EMI (now Warner) with the Danish cellist Andreas Brantelid:

    brantelidchopin.jpg
    "I only have a hunch in what I've become expert." - Leonard Cohen

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    Quote Originally Posted by Judith View Post
    Saw this performed at a local lunchtime recital today in Harrogate and now listening at home performed by Steven Isserlis and Denes Varjon.

    Quite often, the first movement is omitted as it is very complex although it was performed at recital and on this recording. I like it because it is quite a varied movement.
    Believe that it is the last published work of Chopins before he died, but correct me if I'm wrong [...]
    You are correct: According to the booklet of “1846, dernière année à Nohant” (Emmanuelle Bertrand, cello; Pascal Amoyel, piano) the cello sonata “has been the very last work published in Chopin’s lifetime, in 1847”. Alongside with the cello sonata the “Three Waltzes op. 64 were the last to appear in Chopin’s lifetime”.

    Concerning the first movement: “The first public performance of the work was given by the dedicatee and the composer at Chopin’s last public concert in Paris, on 16 February 1848. But they did not play the first movement, which according to Camille O’Meara, a pupil of the composer’s, had not enjoyed unanimous approval from his inner circle at its earlier private hearings, being seen as overelaborate and insufficiently limpid. It was really only in the twentieth century that the Cello Sonata, which is emblematic of Chopin’s late style, marked notably by the importance of counterpoint and by unusual harmonic twists, became established as a repertoire piece.” [text from booklet; see above]

    The CD by Bertrand and Amoyel contains only works which were composed in 1846 in Nohant, George Sand’s estate, shortly before the separation.



    In general I like the cellist Emmanuelle Bertrand, but from time to time I prefer the somewhat livelier performances of others, in this case it would be the performance by Sol Gabetta, cello, and Bertrand Chamayou, piano. Their CD contains works by Chopin and Franchomme (the dedicatee of Chopin’s cello sonata).


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