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Thread: Tchaikovsky and sleep disorders

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    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Default Tchaikovsky and sleep disorders

    Jim Svejda on KUSC is right now playing Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1, Winter Dreams. In a rather lengthy introduction, he claimed that Tchaikovsky, upset by recent reviews, was suffering from insomnia when he wrote it. It was unfortunate, commented Svejda, that neither Philip Glass nor Ludovico Einaudi was around to relieve his insomnia.

    Is Mr. S being a bit unfair? What say ye? Could Glass and Einaudi have provided the same service to Tchaikovsky that Bach did to Count Keyserling?


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    Senior Member EdwardBast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Jim Svejda on KUSC is right now playing Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1, Winter Dreams. In a rather lengthy introduction, he claimed that Tchaikovsky, upset by recent reviews, was suffering from insomnia when he wrote it. It was unfortunate, commented Svejda, that neither Philip Glass nor Ludovico Einaudi was around to relieve his insomnia.

    Is Mr. S being a bit unfair? What say ye? Could Glass and Einaudi have provided the same service to Tchaikovsky that Bach did to Count Keyserling?
    Not unfair, just the wrong prescription, although how he confused emetics with soporifics is beyond me.

    What greater comfort does time afford than the objects of terror re-encountered and their fraudulence exposed in the flash of reason?
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    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
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    Yes, if they don't give me a headache first.

    I was listening btw.
    When all else fails, listen to Thick as a Brick.

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    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    As a sleep aid Glass would more likely irritate the hell out of me and thereby wake me up. I like some of his earlier music but it is all somewhat manic - both in its restlessness and its tendency to make much of slender ideas.

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    Svedja is a rather recent addition to the Record Reviewing staff at Fanfare Magazine. He does seem to be a master of hyperbole
    Last edited by Triplets; Nov-06-2018 at 12:13.

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    Senior Member Dimace's Avatar
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    I can not sleep with any kind of music. I can sleep with the lights turn on, with noises, etc. but not with music. Instinctively I can't stop to follow the music. This is something happened to me many years ago, because I'm listening music the whole day long. So, when I have to go to sleep I need no more of music...
    Geheimnisvoll sie nahen die Lüfte, fraglos gebe ihrem Zauber ich mich hin.

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    Junior Member rodrigaj's Avatar
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    If my body is ready for sleep, but my brain isn't, I find active listening to classical music is the key that turns off the brain.

    Many years ago I was assaulted (punched in the mouth) by a student in a hallway at a school that I taught in. Consequently, my doctor prescribed alprazolam in order that I could sleep at night. My brain, thinking about the incident, would not shut down.

    I always liked classical music but never really actively listened to it. I began to actively listen and found that it was as effective, if not more so, than alprazolam.

    I believe this was exactly what Count Keyserling had discovered, only he did not have the modern playback comforts we have.

    The downside to this phenomenon is that if my body is tired, active listening always triggers the sleep response, and that can be embarrassing during live performances.
    "The function of music is to release us from the tyranny of conscious thought", Sir Thomas Beecham.

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    Well, if Tchaikovsky had slept better , we would have been the losers, as the Winter Dreams Symphony is one of my favorite Tchaikovsky works

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    Senior Member DeepR's Avatar
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    Obviously ambient drone music is far more suitable for this purpose.
    I like a lot of ambient music, as background music, for active listening, or somewhere in between. In the past it has helped me sleep as well. No doubt, some of it would be called new age drivel by many.

    But Einaudi... no, that's worse. You see, ambient music is "just" ambient music, it doesn't try to be anything else, or more. Einaudi on the other hand, his music doesn't work from any perspective: neither as engaging, melodic music nor as background, ambient music. It's simply terrible.
    Last edited by DeepR; Nov-07-2018 at 23:19.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Is Mr. S being a bit unfair? What say ye? Could Glass and Einaudi have provided the same service to Tchaikovsky that Bach did to Count Keyserling?
    Well, I think he's speaking with his tongue in his cheek. But if Tchai really wanted to sleep, he needed to get a choir outside his bedchamber singing English choral music like John Tavener and William Cornish. Those soaring voices of the trebles have a way of calming me down and making me sleepy but in a good way.
    Last edited by Manxfeeder; Nov-08-2018 at 00:16.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Triplets View Post
    Well, if Tchaikovsky had slept better , we would have been the losers, as the Winter Dreams Symphony is one of my favorite Tchaikovsky works
    Just cant relate to it or 2nd or 3rd no matter how many times I listen. I love the other 3 though.
    Last edited by Westindieman; Nov-08-2018 at 17:03.

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