Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 20 of 20

Thread: I Love Pelleas Et Melissande

  1. #16
    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Next to Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    11,462
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post

    Debussy called Parsifal "one of the loveliest monuments of sound ever raised to the serene glory of music." I might say that Pelleas is its truest and greatest successor.
    Now you just saved me twenty bucks in the Tosca thread, but now you give me something to look into and possibly purchase.
    Last edited by Fritz Kobus; Nov-10-2018 at 22:49.
    "All of Italian opera can be heard in [Bellini's] "Ah! non creda [mirarti]."
    --Renata Scotto in "Scotto, More Than a DIva."

  2. Likes Woodduck liked this post
  3. #17
    Senior Member Dr. Shatterhand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1,933
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    People have already suggested Fauré's Pénélope, Poulenc's Dialogues des Carmélites, and Ravel's two operas. Parsifal, too. Excellent choices.

    I'll add:

    Bloch's Macbeth
    Cras' Polyphème
    D'Indy's Fervaal & L'Étranger
    Dukas's Ariane et Barbe-bleue
    Lazzari's La tour de feu & La lépreuse
    Magnard's Guercoeur & Bérénice
    Rabaud's Mârouf, savetier de Caire
    Reyer's Salammbô
    Ropartz's Le pays
    Séverac's Le coeur du moulin & Héliogabale

    Late (post-1900) Massenet

    And Bruneau, if any were recorded!
    Last edited by Dr. Shatterhand; Nov-17-2018 at 12:30.

  4. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    66
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Josquin - Oh, these are very-fine recommendations, as they run the gamut, thru Ravel, Roussel, and even Albeniz (of all people)! … Well, as for your #1 - "Le Martyre ….", by Debussy, himself … there IS one, other that might give (better) the scope and substance of this very-remarkable piece … the old recording with Charles Munch, and the Boston SO (of 1956). I've listened-to Michael TT, and his version is very good; also, haven't listened to Thierry Fischer, but HIS version should be very good, also. …. Overall, though, if one wants a "juxtaposition", so to speak, of Debussy's "Pelleas and Melisande", and his (probably) BEST, other work … for concerted forces w/voices, then I'd always recommend that exceptional, old Munch version of "Martyrdom" … as the comparison to the virtues/vices of "Pelleas …" …. Just an opinion, and thanks.

  5. #19
    Senior Member lextune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    423
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    as he worked on Pelleas he complained about the difficulty of "exorcising the ghost of old Klingsor."
    Debussy went so far as to tear up a scene that he felt he couldn't free from Klingsor's ghost!

  6. Likes Woodduck liked this post
  7. #20
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    12,197
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lextune View Post
    Debussy went so far as to tear up a scene that he felt he couldn't free from Klingsor's ghost!
    You can still find the sorcerer's traces in the interludes Debussy inserted between the scenes: hints of the Parsifal motif, the procession of the Grail knights, the Act 3 prelude's "wandering" motif, the style of the orchestration, with its soft blends of winds and strings. There's even a reminiscence of Siegfried's forest murmurs.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itguucBmGJo

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dUtVFaSjp4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ag9iRnHGmBo

  8. Likes lextune liked this post
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •