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Thread: Wagner's Tristan und Isolde

  1. #46
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Mahler's 1903 performances of Tristan at the Vienna Opera are considered a landmark production, featuring the simplified, expressionistic sets of Alfred Roller, who put into practice some of the ideas of the visionary theorist of the theater, Adolphe Appia. Appia's ideas offered precedents for the productions of Wieland Wagner, with their move away from realistic sets and toward the use of abstract stage pictures and the expressive use of light to mirror the moods of the music and illuminate the psychology of the characters. Roller didn't go as far as Appia or Wieland in the direction of visual abstraction, but his productions were a decisive step toward modern concepts of staging.

    Here are some images from Appia's, Roller's and Wieland's conceptions of Tristan:

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=12...ee8CUYQ4dUDCAc

    https://www.google.com/search?sa=X&s...w=1242&bih=597

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=12...WU6CnwQ4dUDCAc
    Last edited by Woodduck; Nov-09-2019 at 04:58.

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  3. #47
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    Yes, she warns them twice but fails when it matters. Maybe she fell asleep.

  4. #48
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by txtrnl341 View Post
    Yes, she warns them twice but fails when it matters. Maybe she fell asleep.
    Either that or she got absorbed in a good book. Wolfram von Eschenbach's "Parzival," maybe.

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  6. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    Either that or she got absorbed in a good book. Wolfram von Eschenbach's "Parzival," maybe.
    Or the Story of Ginevra...

    N.

  7. #50
    Senior Member Barbebleu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    Mahler's 1903 performances of Tristan at the Vienna Opera are considered a landmark production, featuring the simplified, expressionistic sets of Alfred Roller, who put into practice some of the ideas of the visionary theorist of the theater, Adolphe Appia. Appia's ideas offered precedents for the productions of Wieland Wagner, with their move away from realistic sets and toward the use of abstract stage pictures and the expressive use of light to mirror the moods of the music and illuminate the psychology of the characters. Roller didn't go as far as Appia or Wieland in the direction of visual abstraction, but his productions were a decisive step toward modern concepts of staging.

    Here are some images from Appia's, Roller's and Wieland's conceptions of Tristan:

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=12...ee8CUYQ4dUDCAc

    https://www.google.com/search?sa=X&s...w=1242&bih=597

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=12...WU6CnwQ4dUDCAc
    Roller also did some fabulous stage designs for Rosenkavalier. Great set designer IMHO.
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  8. #51
    Senior Member Barbebleu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    Mahler's 1903 performances of Tristan at the Vienna Opera are considered a landmark production, featuring the simplified, expressionistic sets of Alfred Roller, who put into practice some of the ideas of the visionary theorist of the theater, Adolphe Appia. Appia's ideas offered precedents for the productions of Wieland Wagner, with their move away from realistic sets and toward the use of abstract stage pictures and the expressive use of light to mirror the moods of the music and illuminate the psychology of the characters. Roller didn't go as far as Appia or Wieland in the direction of visual abstraction, but his productions were a decisive step toward modern concepts of staging.

    Here are some images from Appia's, Roller's and Wieland's conceptions of Tristan:

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=12...ee8CUYQ4dUDCAc

    https://www.google.com/search?sa=X&s...w=1242&bih=597

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=12...WU6CnwQ4dUDCAc
    This is a link to a nice article on Roller

    https://mahlerfoundation.org/en/mahl...fred-1864-1935
    Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate!

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