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Thread: Finding a Teacher

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    Default Finding a Teacher

    I am seeking information on how to find a teacher or tutor to begin learning a piano. Please somebody leave some best suggestions with useful references.

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonHolloway View Post
    I am seeking information on how to find a teacher or tutor to begin learning a piano. Please somebody leave some best suggestions with useful references.
    Thinking to Start Piano Journey

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogerx View Post
    Then, May I discuss everything on the same thread? And I would like to let you know one thing is I am using a forum for the first time. Please give me suggestion that how can I use it in a proper way. I request you Rogerx.

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonHolloway View Post
    Then, May I discuss everything on the same thread? And I would like to let you know one thing is I am using a forum for the first time. Please give me suggestion that how can I use it in a proper way. I request you Rogerx.

    By answering questions you've been ask, giving advice to a teenager is somewhat different then towards an adult.
    And no, you don't have to, but just an indication would help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogerx View Post
    By answering questions you've been ask, giving advice to a teenager is somewhat different then towards an adult.
    And no, you don't have to, but just an indication would help.
    Ok, I'm thankful to you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonHolloway View Post
    I am seeking information on how to find a teacher or tutor to begin learning a piano. Please somebody leave some best suggestions with useful references.
    Hi Jason Hollaway,
    If you looking for a teacher for learning piano then my suggestion is to find a piano teacher nearby you. When you find a piano teacher then you should ask specific questions about the learning style,check his teaching history then choose a good piano teacher.You can also take online lessons from youtube and other Websites.

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    Unless you actually know someone who has a teacher, you have to start somewhere. If it were me, I would do an online search for piano teachers in my area. Then interview them. Find out what their background is. Have them play for you. Or if you live near a university, find out if someone might be available for lessons. Seek out the best teacher that’s affordable. You might start out with a 30-minute lesson and then go from there. You’ll learn faster with a proper teacher rather than fumbling around on your own. It’s never too early or too late to start learning. Find out if you have talent. Some music shops have teachers. If you live in a relatively populated area, you shouldn’t have trouble finding a good teacher. If you live in a rural area, some teachers give online lessons that can be very good. But you have to put in the work yourself to find somebody, and it might not happen right off the bat. Persistence is necessary. Good luck. I doubt if anyone learns an instrument without paying some dues, and I’m not necessarily referring to spending money on lessons. It’s a privilege to learn an instrument and a great deal of practice is usually involved.
    Last edited by Larkenfield; Dec-28-2018 at 10:43.
    "That's all Folks!"

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    My wife was a teacher for many years. She always said that the students who gave her the most trouble to teach were the mature students who felt they should be playing things much harder than they were, before they had learned the basics. Whereas kids don't mind playing 'Mary had a little lamb' adults found such things beneath them!

    I think we ought to remember that the best teacher if you're starting out is not necessarily the best teacher you will end up with. Some teachers (usually less gifted pianists themselves) are great at teaching the basics and empathising with a students' struggles whereas a brilliant pianist may not be so patient with you. I certainly found that myself. Some teachers are great with highly gifted students but not so good with those lower down the ladder. Bear that in mind.
    Last edited by DavidA; Dec-28-2018 at 10:41.

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    Jason Holloway, do you have a music store near you? have you viewed the kind of piano you like? Test it out before you buy it, the store assistant will be able to play something for you so you can hear can hear the sound, and give you all the advice you need. I started with a Yamaha Clavinova CLP-470.

    In your music store, they should supply you with a list of local pianists? That is how I found mine.
    You can also google piano tutors in your locality.



    Here is a video about the piano I bought............https://youtu.be/b3e7hAY5-co



    AS far as giving references and recommendations, I can't supply that, as you may be in a different country to me. It is a matter of trying out who you get on with . If someone gives you a reference because they have had him, it does not mean that tutor will be suitable for you. Try them out, both you and the tutor need to gel with each other. If he is a good tutor , he will know exactly where to start with you. He needs to get to know your personality first.

    I began with a tutor who was pianist and organist. Choir master at a local Church, he was also a music teacher and very gifted too. At first I was unsure if I would get on with him, after a while we are now good friends and I stuck with him, and he knows exactly my little difficulties and learning/ reading music speed, my timing, and when I am ready to be challenged with more technical pieces etc. He is also very patient, always instils confidence, something I lacked at first , but not so bad now. .
    Last edited by poco a poco; Dec-30-2018 at 11:36.

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    The local conservatory depending on where you live.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

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    On the internet, the following 5 French pianists & 1 American (Jerome Rose) are well worth studying with, and you can progress from beginner to advanced at your own pace. Personally, I'd leap at the chance to take lessons with Beroff & Rouvier, who are both pianists that I've admired in the 19th & 20th century French repertory:

    http://www.iplaythepiano.com/

    Otherwise, find out who are the best teachers in your area, and listen to them play. You have to like the way they play the piano. For example, if they pound the keys heavily & insensitively, and don't make a beautiful tone, I'd suggest that you find someone else. As a teacher's weaknesses & shortcomings often become the student's.
    Last edited by Josquin13; Jan-01-2019 at 21:22.

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    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josquin13 View Post
    On the internet, the following 5 French pianists & 1 American (Jerome Rose) are well worth studying with, and you can progress from beginner to advanced at your own pace. Personally, I'd leap at the chance to take lessons with Beroff & Rouvier, who are both pianists that I've admired in the 19th & 20th century French repertory:

    http://www.iplaythepiano.com/

    Otherwise, find out who are the best teachers in your area, and listen to them play. You have to like the way they play the piano. For example, if they pound the keys heavily & insensitively, and don't make a beautiful tone, I'd suggest that you find someone else. As a teacher's weaknesses & shortcomings often become the student's.
    But the OP is a beginner. He surely needs some elementary tuition before paying a fortune for lessons with noted pianists and teachers. My advice is ask round your area for someone who is good, dependent on budget.
    Last edited by DavidA; Jan-01-2019 at 21:44.

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    DavidA writes, "But the OP is a beginner. He surely needs some elementary tuition before paying a fortune for lessons with noted pianists and teachers."

    The iplaythepiano.com courses start at the beginning level, with the basics, if the student wishes, and then they can progress from there, at their own pace:

    "lessons

    Learn at your own pace. Print the sheet music, listen to the piece, and download a recording of the accompaniment (for 4-hand pieces).

    For beginners

    iplaythepiano.com has a beginners’ course designed especially for those who are just starting the piano. All the basic elements are explained and demonstrated, and each video includes exercises and/or pieces to put what you learn to work. These elements include: hand position, notes on the keyboard, meter, dynamics, rhythm, and many more.

    For intermediate pianists

    Take advantage of our teachers’ advice on pieces categorized by difficulty from Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy, and many others, for both 2 and 4 hands. Explore the fundamentals of piano technique with Marie-Josephe Jude and Jean-Marc Luisada.

    For advanced pianists

    Our teachers guide you through the great works of the pianistic repertoire: Beethoven’s Bagatelle, Brahms’ Intermezzi, Chopin’s Mazurkas and Waltzes, Debussy’s Preludes, Schumann’s Scenes from Childhood, Papillons, and many more."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Josquin13 View Post
    DavidA writes, "But the OP is a beginner. He surely needs some elementary tuition before paying a fortune for lessons with noted pianists and teachers."

    The iplaythepiano.com courses start at the beginning level, with the basics, if the student wishes, and then they can progress from there, at their own pace:

    "lessons

    Learn at your own pace. Print the sheet music, listen to the piece, and download a recording of the accompaniment (for 4-hand pieces).

    For beginners

    iplaythepiano.com has a beginners’ course designed especially for those who are just starting the piano. All the basic elements are explained and demonstrated, and each video includes exercises and/or pieces to put what you learn to work. These elements include: hand position, notes on the keyboard, meter, dynamics, rhythm, and many more.

    For intermediate pianists

    Take advantage of our teachers’ advice on pieces categorized by difficulty from Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy, and many others, for both 2 and 4 hands. Explore the fundamentals of piano technique with Marie-Josephe Jude and Jean-Marc Luisada.

    For advanced pianists

    Our teachers guide you through the great works of the pianistic repertoire: Beethoven’s Bagatelle, Brahms’ Intermezzi, Chopin’s Mazurkas and Waltzes, Debussy’s Preludes, Schumann’s Scenes from Childhood, Papillons, and many more."
    Sorry I misunderstood. I have a friend who learned that way through books but it seems to me you need an awful lot of self discipline that way. A real live teacher is vital for most people

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    If you looking for a piano teacher then check local universities or churches to find a tutor. Many cities have professional guilds of piano, who can help you to find a good teacher. You can also find piano teacher through online websites.

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