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Thread: Debussy piano works...What are your favorite recordings?

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    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
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    Question Debussy piano works...What are your favorite recordings?

    What are your favorite Debussy piano recordings?
    When all else fails, listen to Thick as a Brick.

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    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I have the Paul Crossley set on Sony that I bought for 10 bucks. It's now available in a larger Sony Debussy box. It sounds fine to my ears. But there are many recordings to choose from.
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    I like Michangeli DG recordings and I also enjoy Claudio Arrau in the Preludes

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    Claudio Arrau (on you tube, don't own it yet), Noriko Ogawa's set, Mitsuko Uchida's Preludes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinera View Post
    Claudio Arrau (on you tube, don't own it yet), Noriko Ogawa's set, Mitsuko Uchida's Preludes.
    This might interested you.


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    Senior Member philoctetes's Avatar
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    Claudio Arrau and Samson Francois

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    Senior Member realdealblues's Avatar
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    For a complete set of piano works from one artist then I will echo the Paul Crossley set and add Jean-Efflam Bavouzet. Both are excellent.

    Samson Francios recorded most of his works and while he can be very idiosyncratic, they are very rewarding to hear. Claudio Arrau's late Debussy recordings are also very rewarding although the tempos are generally on the slow side (Has there been a slower recording of Clair de lune?).

    For individual recordings of the large works...

    Preludes Books I & II - Steven Osborne
    Etudes Books I & II - Mitsuko Uchida
    Images Books I & II - Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli
    Estampes - Sviatoslav Richter

    All come to mind...there are a lot of little short works and for those I usually just stay with Crossley or Bavouzet.
    Last edited by realdealblues; Jan-16-2019 at 16:32.

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    Senior Member D Smith's Avatar
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    For the Preludes and especially for the Etudes I would recommend listening to Paul Jacobs. His phrasing and touch works very well for me.

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    Senior Member joen_cph's Avatar
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    I've chosen recordings especially by:

    Historical:
    Daniel Ericourt, Gieseking (quite a few of the piano works), Cortot, Marcelle Meyer, Robert Casadesus, downloads with George Copeland.

    Later half of the 20th century:
    S.Richter, Jörg Demus (almost the complete piano works), N. Lee (almost the complete piano works), Livia Rev, Werner Haas, Hans Henkemans, Grant Johannesen, Nikita Magaloff, Malcolm Binns.

    More recent decades:
    G.Fergus-Thomson (almost the complete piano works), Zimerman, Michelangeli, Kocsis, Fou Tsong, Argerich, Arrau, Uchida

    plus a few more.

    But there are tons of other interesting or potentially interesting ones - there are so many options as regards individual interpretations of these works. I am tempted by Ciccolini, but I just decided that at least at the moment I can't go on collecting more versions.
    Last edited by joen_cph; Jan-16-2019 at 17:59.

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    With a handful of exceptions, I'm generally most drawn to recordings by pianists that have a direct lineage back to Debussy (&/or Ravel, Faure, etc.), and the musical world of Paris at the turn of the last century.

    I. Historically, I find Debussy's own piano roll recordings to be fascinating. Interestingly, I wouldn't characterize his piano playing as modern--in contrast to pianists that take a more 20th century view of Debussy's music (such as Paul Jacobs, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Maurizio Pollini, etc.):

    Debussy plays Debussy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMrd...aseHyIk13t3ltM

    It's difficult to find current pianists that approach Debussy's music in a similar vein to the composer. It might surprise people but I find the Romanian pianist Radu Lupu's highly imaginative Debussy playing comes closest--though Lupu's training wasn't in the French piano tradition (but rather he studied in Bucharest & Russia). I'm not sure why this is, except that I've heard Lupu play Debussy live, and he has the most perfect piano touch for Debussy's music. (I can recall reading an interview with Andras Schiff where he enthusiastically made the same point.) However, Lupu hasn't recorded any of the solo piano music in the studio, apart from the Violin Sonata (with Chung). Therefore, you have to search out bootlegs of his concerts, where he has played the Preludes:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yevp5XQLQsA (Lupu's Preludes Book 1 begin at 40:35 into the concert--however, the sound quality isn't state of the art, so you'll have to use your imagination to some extent)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfLa8pMVsEE.

    For me, Lupu is arguably the finest living Debussy interpreter.

    II. There are also pianists and students of pianists that can trace their lineage back to Debussy's teaching and guidance--starting with pianists that actually knew the composer: such as George Copeland, Marcel Ciampi, Riccardo Vines, Daniel Ericourt, Marcelle Meyer, & Harold Bauer. As a young woman, Meyer worked on the Preludes with Debussy, and premiered his Etudes in Paris. (She was also Erik Satie's favorite pianist, and it was Satie that introduced her to Debussy.) Ciampi was likewise coached by Debussy on the Preludes and taught his students from his own Preludes score, which contained handwritten notes by Debussy, and markings that Ciampi said came directly from the composer (today Ciampi's score is in the possession of one of his students, Cécille Ousset, who shares it with her students). Vines likewise premiered works by Debussy, and taught Meyer, Poulenc, & other notable pianists. Poulenc later said of his teacher that Vines was the only "virtuoso" that played Debussy & Ravel's music in 1914. (Indeed Vines premiered Ravel's difficult Gaspard de la Nuit in Paris in 1909.) Unfortunately, Vines had a dislike of the recording process, and only recorded Debussy's Soirée dans Grenade (Estampes), Poissons d'or (Images, Bk. 2), Hommage a Rameau (Images Bk.1), and the Etude No. 10--all in the 1930s (see YT links below). Ericourt knew Debussy and his family as a teenager, but was only 15 when Debussy died in 1918--hence, I'm doubtful that he worked in depth with the composer on his music, unlike several others. Bauer was Debussy's choice to give the world premiere his solo piano work, Children's Corner, in Paris in 1908--but frustratingly, Bauer didn't record it. However, Bauer did leave critical editions of Debussy's Reverie & Clair du Lune and recorded both works. (Ravel dedicated the Ondine movement of his Gaspard de la Nuit to Bauer, which tells us just how highly both Debussy & Ravel esteemed his piano playing.) Copeland was a student of Bauer's, and met Debussy in 1911 in Paris. Copeland studied with Debussy for several months, during which time he discussed & played all of Debussy's solo piano works with the composer. Later, Copeland wrote of their encounter:

    "I have never heard anyone play the piano in my life who understood the tone of every note as you do," remarked Debussy. "Come again tomorrow." This seemed praise indeed and I did go tomorrow. I found him much more genial than on my first visit, and then I went time after time, until finally I was with him about twice a week for three months. I bought new copies of his works, which he marked for me; I played his works and he criticised my work and showed me what to do and how to do it. In the end, he admitted that I played him just as he wanted to be played and represented to the people." (Wikipedia: Archie Bell. "Copeland and Debussy," The Cleveland Plain-Dealer, January 15, 1913).

    While this may sound like a bit of self-promotion, Copeland's Debussy playing does attest to a special relationship between Copeland & Debussy's music, in my opinion, & arguably more so than with several other pianists that knew & worked with Debussy, except perhaps Ciampi & Vines. I'd be most curious if Copeland's Debussy scores have survived (does anyone know?), considering that he wrote Debussy left detailed markings on his scores.

    Copeland:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yn2FbXvsvKE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZlC...20EACE65A5CB16

    Vines:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6NYBehLMNk

    Ciampi:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acvu4Ey2cOw

    Meyer:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWh03aPkJnE

    Bauer:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JckzoQ6vcw8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtN_Iyq7s6M

    Ericourt:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GB3MOT1RZR4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3F1HWaqbJY
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IAstC2AbEU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UqynAVchAEs

    Robert Schmitz should also be mentioned. Schmitz likewise knew Debussy and gave the world premiere of his Premiére Rhapsodie. Schmitz recorded the entire Preludes Books 1 & 2 and Suite Bergamasque on Victor LPs, but they've never made it to CD. An analysis of Debussy's piano works by Schmitz was published posthumously after his death in 1950: https://www.amazon.com/Claude-Debuss...sr=1-2-catcorr. Personally, I don't think Schmitz's Debussy playing is quite as captivating & interesting as Copeland, Ciampi, Bauer, Meyer, and Vines'.

    Schmitz:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dmj3MTsx9EM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hpw3XIWdx1o
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zizmpU-Sz6k
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZHL1E4ILHo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmCARN6Rppg
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFp82sfhvg0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alRJzhFDLx0

    Pianist Gaby Casadesus also met Debussy, who was a judge at a piano competition where she was awarded the first prize. She subsequently became friends with Debussy's daughter, Claude-Emma, or "Chou-Chou", as a teenager. But Casadesus doesn't seem to have actually studied with Debussy, although I suppose it's possible that he offered her guidance, considering that she visited his house on numerous occasions. In an interview, Casadesus' student Philippe Bianconi said that his teacher helped him more with the music of Ravel, since she and her husband Robert had known Ravel well and could "transmit direct experience" to him. However, Bianconi also said that in regards to Debussy's solo piano music that Casadesus "helped me enormously with technical aspects as well as with my approach to the colors and subtleties of the music" (from the liner booklet to Bianconi's Debussy's Preludes Books 1 & 2, on the La Dolce Volta label):

    Gaby Casadesus:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfpDmRkQEnM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HV9uoFteLPY
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKYfWwY6gTk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYCE6Mf65q0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBRHyiDJYFw

    Bianconi: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qwh...hi46yFTgMKyuiQ
    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-24-Pr.../dp/B00865P3F8

    Of the pianists that knew and worked with Debussy, I'd say that Ciampi was probably the most influential teacher of pianists active today: partly because he held the longest tenure in the history of the Paris Conservatoire, and also became head of the piano department at the Menuhin School in England. Among Ciampi's students to record Debussy's piano music are Yvonne Loriod, Cécille Ousset, Micéal O'Rourke, Kathryn Stott, & Eric Heidsieck (while another Ciampi student, Jean-Marc Luisada has performed Debussy in concert, but has yet to make any Debussy recordings--which is something to look forward to, I'd imagine, since fine Chopin pianists usually make very good Debussy pianists, & vice versa):

    1. Yvonne Loriod--Debussy Etudes for piano, Books 1 & 2, Erato label, Musical Heritage Society, LP--no CD releases, as far as I can tell. Loriod was subsequently the teacher of Michel Béroff at the Paris Conservatoire, who has made remarkable recordings of Debussy's solo piano music, both for EMI (early in his career) and later a complete survey for Denon: https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Compl...c&sr=1-1-spell (which is also available individually). (Of interest, the South Korean pianist, Seong-Jin Cho, whose recent recording Debussy recording for DG has received accolades, studied with Béroff: https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Image...sr=1-1-catcorr)

    Loriod: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XijgAHryf0

    Béroff:
    EMI: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiDcrszfgsE &
    Denon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sfh9tL-CNw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPNH...EDA805CD8FD598

    2. Eric Heidsieck--A. Debussy Preludes for piano, Book 2, Disques Cassiopée, LP; B. Preludes for piano, Book 2, Disques Cassiopée, LP; C. Debussy L'Isle Joyeuse, Pour le Piano, Hommage A Rameau, Estampes, Disques Cassiopée, LP; C. Live Recital, 1985: Debussy Prelude, Book 2, no. 2, Feuilles mortes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWoR0NEl8Ro

    Heidsieck, Preludes:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx_LUSgoXVs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zoigJmT3wso
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mw34Cn1djJA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Px-SVBd-9dc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bia-3tjmbPU

    Estampes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPgXPqpmVBo

    3. Cécille Ousset: A. Debussy Pour le piano, Poissons d'or, Les collines, Feux d'artifice, Ce qu'a vu le vent d'Ouest, Pour les degrés chromatiques, Pour les arpéges composés, Jardins sous la pluie, Feuilles mortes, L'Isle joyeuse, Berlin Classics (coupled with Ravel piano works); B. Debussy Preludes Books 1 & 2, Suite Bergamasque, Pour le piano, L'Isle joyeuse, EMI digital. As mentioned, her teacher Marcel Ciampi passed down his marked score of the Preludes to Ousset. This score has been used by one of Ousset's students, pianist Francesco Piemontesi, for his recent Naive recording of the Preludes Books 1 & 2: https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Pr%C3...c&sr=1-1-fkmr0)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yKx6Om4umM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UN_kzT5XDMc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HTXk5jattc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_FM8twWF8A
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mb71YuAkc44
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVFmqKhWuHA

    https://www.amazon.com/Claude-Debuss...c&sr=1-1-fkmr1
    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Prelu...c&sr=1-2-fkmr0
    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Prelu...c&sr=1-1-fkmr0

    4. Miceal O'Rourke: Debussy Preludes Book 1 & Estampes, Chandos Records, CD: https://www.amazon.com/Preludes-Book...c&sr=1-1-fkmr2

    5. Kathryn Stott: A. Debussy Suite Bergamasque, Deux Arabesques, Reverie, La Plus Que Lente, Images Book 1, Conifer label; B. L'Isle Joyeuse (one of the finest recordings I've heard of this work--see link below), Ballade, Suite Bergamasque, Deux Arabesque, Reverie, La Plus Quie Lente, Images Book 1, Sony (coupled with Ravel piano works):

    L'Isle Joyeuse: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grZJalOx0qQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQFxKw7UOYc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqXwzUW_fhM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsaNaZy3SSA

    https://www.amazon.com/Kathryn-Stott...sr=1-1-catcorr
    https://www.amazon.com/Kathryn-Stott...sr=1-2-catcorr

    Of Ciampi's students, I'd say that O'Rourke & Heidsieck most play Debussy's music in the Ciampi-Debussy tradition, and I've particularly enjoyed O'Rourke's Chandos recording of the Preludes Book 1 (which unfortunately isn't on You Tube); although his Estampes are surprisingly less animated and characterful than I'm used to, or would consider ideal: after all, this is distinctly Javanese Gamelan influenced music, which represented a new change or development in Debussy's musical aesthetic (after Erik Satie had insisted that Debussy attend a Gamelan concert in Paris). However, the Debussy playing of Ousset and Stott is fascinating too.

    To be continued below, in a second post...
    Last edited by Josquin13; Jan-23-2019 at 00:22.

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    To continue from above,

    III. In this section, I'll cover pianists that were active in Paris during Debussy's era (in the early part of the 20th century), but didn't have a direct connection to Debussy--yet had special connections to other French composers of the period, such as Ravel, Faure, etc., and left us first rate recordings of Debussy's solo piano music:

    A. Magda Tagliaferro (who knew Gabriel Pierne, Reynaldo Hahn, & Gabriel Faure):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66hMeLUwIq4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-215ULKjT6s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9lTTNsQPC0

    B. Lazare Lévy (who was a fellow student of Ravel's at the Paris Conservatoire):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vER0NOMumxA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ng7OEZB0RAs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACuS1xy7y6o

    Several of Tagliaferro & Lévy's students have recorded excellent Debussy:

    Lévy--Monique Haas: she first recorded the Preludes Books 1 & 2 and Etudes for DG, and then in the mid-1960s a complete set of Debussy solo piano works for Erato (at her best, Haas is a favorite of mine):

    Haas on DG:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFhWSA8QLg8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIG-oW-1ppE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zA6SFRmWLg
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwyP4SieOvQ
    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Prelu...c&sr=1-6-spell

    Haas on Erato: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9zkGfyH6u8

    Tagliaferro's students--

    Cristina Ortiz:
    https://www.amazon.com/Impressions-F...&sr=1-1-fkmr0: a favorite disc of mine.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4h0FdKHXGw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3Sl3yUFahA

    Daniel Varsano: Today, Varsano is primarily known for his excellent Satie & Faure Dolly Suite (with Tagliaferro). Like Tagliaferro, he had amazing finger control and sense of color at the piano, but unfortunately he died tragically young of AIDS, in Paris, at the age of 33, before he could record much Debussy (or pass on the French tradition that he had learned from his teacher), which is a considerable loss: https://www.discogs.com/Ravel-Claude...elease/8630699.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2IksnD5fQE

    C. Another French pianist that was active in Paris during Debussy's era was Yvonne Lefébure (1898-1986), who not only left us some very fine Debussy recordings--especially of the Preludes Book 1 (see link below), but also was a highly regarded teacher. She had herself studied with Alfred Cortot. Lefeburé's pupils included Dinu Lipatti, Samson François, Imogen Cooper, Janina Fialkowska, André Laplante, Catharine Collard, Michaël Lévinas, Françoise Thinat, & Évelyne Crochet. Of these--François, Collard, Lévinas, & Thinat have made excellent Debussy recordings, especially François, though I can find his Debussy slightly erratic at times, considering that his later Debussy recordings for EMI were the pianist's final recordings before his tragic, untimely death:

    Lefébure:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoeSOEtSgi0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zbA6h3K5FU
    https://www.amazon.com/Couperin-Debu...7759452&sr=8-2

    Lefébure's students--

    François (who Alfred Cortot passed onto her, when he found François difficult to teach):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-orK3rqSzc: François' beautifully varied playing of the Debussy Reverie is one of my all-time favorite versions of this piece.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_OZr09HkDo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=330eRFcVnqg
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIKr9Umgl5k
    The recent French EMI remasters are the best to date:
    https://www.amazon.com/Samson-Fran%C...sr=1-1-catcorr
    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Piano...s=Music&sr=1-1

    Catharine Collard: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-wLTRWVKlE

    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Prelu...c&sr=1-1-fkmr0

    Lévinas: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLhS...XMQjZNqSqE3Xfc

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...dm_ws_sp_ps_dp

    Thinat (& Jacques Bernier): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEz2...zz4nkFUwQw3EVw

    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Trans...s&sr=1-1-spell

    D. Jacques Fevrier (1900-1979)--like Robert & Gaby Casadesus, Fevrier was a friend of Ravel's (as was his father). Fevrier was also a student of Marguerite Long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXHk...64juU9zUmj40fQ

    Fevrier's students included Georges Pludermacher, Alain Planès, Gabriel Tacchino, & Valerie Tryon, all of whom have made very fine Debussy recordings:

    Planès:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwE1ggYk-2w
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idX5UPx3LTU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=belUiQrYwPY
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXVijRglNLE
    https://www.amazon.com/Gesamtwerk-f%...7759560&sr=8-1
    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Ravel...s=Music&sr=1-1

    Pludermacher:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_iYoNCW23E
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFwf_QEQgwA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8OD...e4TV1fTIBwWPVM

    Tacchino: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWLR2JXeNs4

    E. Vlado Perlemuter (1904-2002)--Perlemuter knew both Faure & Ravel, and worked closely with Ravel on his music (& as with Ciampi and Debussy, Perlemuter's Ravel scores contain many markings given to him by the composer). Personally, I find Perlemuter's Faure playing to be particularly underrated. His students included Michel Dalberto, Jacques Rouvier, Jean-François Heisser, and Roy Howat, who are all known for their Debussy. I've especially liked Dalberto's two Debussy recordings--on RCA (1999): https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Prelu...c&sr=1-3-spell, & APARTE (live at the Mantua Festival), as well as Rouvier's 1980s Denon survey (which the old Penquin Guide compared favorably to Claudio Arrau in the Preludes Books 1 & 2): https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Compl...s=Music&sr=1-1.

    Dalberto: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mb7H...SWGIk6nHxF3-8w
    Rouvier: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9L0o...gQL26R0nhgpXp0
    Howat: https://www.amazon.com/Vol-4-Debussy.../dp/B00026VPP6

    In addition, Howat is known for his excellent critical editions of Debussy's solo piano music (published by Durand) and his insightful writings & lectures on Debussy's music, especially his book "Debussy in Proportion" (& if you own Dinu Ciani's Debussy Preludes on DG, the fascinating booklet notes are written by Howat):

    https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Propo.../dp/0521311454
    https://www.amazon.com/Pour-piano-Pi...s&sr=1-1-spell
    https://www.amazon.com/Art-French-Pi...c&sr=1-2-spell
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-PmKX6rijQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3f_UEnIHXcw
    https://royhowat.com/debussy/

    Heisser (& Pludermacher): https://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Trans...sr=1-1-catcorr

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_iYoNCW23E
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yx5GRLavZ2w: Here's a rarity: Debussy's transcription of Wagner's Flying Dutchman Overture.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFwf_QEQgwA

    F. Robert Casadesus--who, as mentioned, was a friend of Ravel's. I've never been 100% on Casadesus' Debussy, finding it occasionally too strict or tight, although at other times I admit that he is truly remarkable in this music. Rather, I tend to prefer his wife, Gaby's Debussy, as well as their recordings together as a piano duo (although Robert Casadesus' 'clock-like' Ravel can be fascinating & I gather idiomatic). However, with that said, I have liked the Debussy playing of Casadesus' students, especially Monique Haas (who also studied with Lévy, as noted), Claude Helffer, & to a lesser extent, the American pianist Grant Johannesen. Both Haas and Helffer made excellent recordings of the complete solo piano works of Debussy:

    Robert Casadesus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KgulkSJphg
    Helffer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N33y80dzfZs

    In addition, more recently, one of Helffer's students, Håkon Austbø, has made superb recordings of Debussy's complete piano works for the Simax label (& he's been given excellent sound quality too):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLnn...-nAdV3vWsVITPk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TsRt...Mr7g9diWa6-i0c

    G. Marguerite Long--Long had direct connections to Ravel & Faure: her students included Jacques Fevrier, Samson François, & Philippe Entremont. Both Fevrier and François recorded Debussy and Ravel's complete works.

    The above lists are by no means 'complete'. I'm sure I've missed some pianists with direct connections back to Debussy & his world, or to the Paris Conservatoire of Debussy's era (& I'd be interested to hear about any standout Debussy interpreters that I've missed, in that regard). Nevertheless, if you sample many of the links above, I expect you'll begin to hear certain commonalities between pianists--such as generally slower tempi than you might expect, at times, and the creation of a highly atmospheric, colorful, and expressive sound world, along with strong characterful & imaginative interpretations. Indeed, they don't tend to play Debussy with a cold detachment, which in my opinion gives us a very good idea about what is truly 'idiomatic' Debussy playing, at least in relation to the composer's own piano rolls and the recordings left by his students and friends.

    I'll write a third post later, & talk about some of my favorite Debussy pianists that don't have any connection back to Debussy's world, but are nonetheless first rate in his music, in my estimation--such as Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli (especially his Images Books 1 & 2), Claudio Arrau, Zoltan Kocsis, Nelson Freire, Livia Rev, and Ivan Moravec.
    Last edited by Josquin13; Jan-23-2019 at 00:52.

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  16. #12
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    Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli does it for me in Debussy, beautifully recorded too and an attractive offer in this CD-Boxset-era

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    Quote Originally Posted by NLAdriaan View Post
    71ix5p1tBQL._SS500_.jpg

    Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli does it for me in Debussy, beautifully recorded too and an attractive offer in this CD-Boxset-era
    These recordings were a revelation in my youth.

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    If Planès cannot compete in some of the most famous works, he does well in some of the lesser works.

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    Any thoughts on Kathryn Stott?

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