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Thread: What makes a good film score? A discussion of WHY you love your fav. film scores

  1. #16
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    I think the score depends on the meaning of the movie
    if it is unreal out of the life
    who think it will be related
    Last edited by Chi_townPhilly; Jan-23-2010 at 11:22. Reason: promotional URL-link removed

  2. #17
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    The score of a movie depend on it's many parts like story,plot and Camera work. Many time when you watch any movie than you easy guess that what would be the next scene, i don't like such movies. I like such movie in which you find something beyond the imagination.

  3. #18
    Senior Member Antiquarian's Avatar
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    A good film score compliments the film action and subject. Music supports the portrayed emotions on screen, and a good score draws out a reciprocal response from the audience, one that allows us to participate in the action instead of being a mere spectator. For instance, throughout David Lean's "Doctor Zhivago" there is a leitmotif (if that is the correct term) performed by a balalaika that is associated with Yuri. At the end of the film, when he sees the Lara for the last time, and Yevgraf reveals to Tonya her heritage, the use of this and other themes subconciously elicits emotions in the audience. Even now, not having seen the film in a while, hearing Maurice Jarre's score alone produces in me the same emotions.

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  5. #19
    Senior Member Headphone Hermit's Avatar
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    Another vote for Morricone - Once Upon a Time in the West

    - a great series of leitmotif for the main protagonists
    - music that was composed in parallel with the film so that certain shots and their music are intertwined with meaning (for example the famous panning shot of the town after Caludia Cardinale arrives in town)
    - music that is integral to the story, especially the harmonica theme that presages the shoot-out at the end
    - a soundtrack that isn't just 'music' - for example the famous opening sequence that lasts 10 minutes without dialogue, music (or actually much happening) but which is rivetting
    - music that is emblematic of the themes of the movie, not just the characters
    - music that you remember afterwards
    - most importantly, music that YOU enjoy as much as the film
    Last edited by Headphone Hermit; Jun-04-2014 at 16:13.
    "Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils." Berlioz, 1856

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  7. #20
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    only way i can explain this is through examples.

    First example, Titanic. (great film score. on top of that they have a quintet playing ruthlessly as the boat is sinking.)
    The Score was on top of things. It made the movie captivating. James Horner did a splended job. After seeing this at age 12 or thirteen. I begged my mom for the soundtrack. The Soundtrack ended up keeping the emotions with the film with the imagery included.

    Second Example, Mononoke Hime (beautiful film score.)
    This is the epitome of an emotional response in film. The characters had themes, and their themes fit their character. again, (at this time i had the money to get the soundtrack.) I listened to this non-stop when i came home from school.

    ironic thing i just noticed. both soundtracks have a vocal track. lol

    Third example, Batman (the 1988 one) (horrible score, beautiful movie.)
    well... no almost every Danny Elfman score feels too similar from the last. Also, the most prolithic music is during the opening credits.

    Fourth Example, from an anime. and non-classical. Tokyo Ghoul. (beautiful story, apathic music to what is going on... with the exception of the last episode on the first season... it fit perfectly.)

    Fifth and Final Example. Nadome Cantabile.
    this really isn't a score... but the anime is basically what led me to loving classical music to it's fullest. and inspired me to start writing scores.
    the music they use are abridged versions of Brahms' First, Rachmanicov's Second Piano Concerto, a bunch of Liszt, Chopin, and there is even a Mozart fanatic. Suprizingly I was expecting more Beethoven, but i think they only mention the road he walked on. The Voice actors are all musically inclined and have had practiced the instruments. But they also had a bit of background music at certain points. which fit the emotion. (it is my favourite anime.)

    But, most of my experience with theatrical scores are from anime.

  8. #21
    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
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    My favourite film score is Leonard Rosenman’s Lord of the Rings (not Howard Shore’s). Unlike many film scores, it has a lot of development. It uses consonant music to depict the forces of good, and some bittersweet moments, and dissonant music for forces of evil, and lots of polytonality in between in the struggle of good and evil. It also has a bit of microtonality used to good effect. Personally I think this score is better than a lot of concert Classical Music. Rosenman studied with Schoenberg and Sessions. He also had a promising concert career sharing the bill with Babbitt until he started writing for films. He introduced modernism into movies
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

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  10. #22
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    I love the score to John Carpenter's Halloween. A simple dark melody in 5/4 that just defines the film. Another score I enjoy a lot is Neil Young's improvised score to the film Dead Man starring Johnny Depp. It is perfect!

  11. #23
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    As someone who composes silent film music, this is an endless topic of conversation, as many early scores for silents consisted of cut-and-paste classical/romantic/library music which sometimes works in a general way but very rarely in the specific, moment-to-moment way that good composers try to do. Similarly, using pop songs for soundtracks gives a great feeling for the time and mood—GOODFELLAS is one of the best examples of this sort of score—but I always try to get into the particulars of the emotional flow of scenes in my work, and I know people appreciate that.

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