Page 1 of 16 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 229

Thread: What represents the peak of Mozart's works to you?

  1. #1
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    5,649
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question What represents the peak of Mozart's works to you?

    I apologize if this thread has been done before, but it seemed like it could be an interesting discussion.

    Mozart belongs to a rare class of composers in that he excelled in almost every genre he undertook, from opera to symphony to chamber ensembles to solo pieces.

    In your opinion, which form of composition was his greatest strength? I suspect many will say opera, and that may be the right answer. I'm a new fan of his (and not too big on opera in general to be honest) and have heard very little of his operas. But as mentioned before he has made gems in almost every genre of classical music at the time.

    Personally, I think his symphonies are my favorite of his work, once he started to really hit his stride with it around the 25th. He had a lot of talent in structure and orchestration. I'm a big fan of the piano concertos as well, but I haven't heard any of the early ones (1-11).

    What do you think?

  2. Likes science liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ashland, OR
    Posts
    16,040
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Egad. Another Mozart thread.

    If I had to pick one work, it would be the String Quintet in G minor, K516. But I don't have to pick one work.

  4. #3
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sharon, Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,632
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    If I had to pick one work, it would be the String Quintet in G minor, K516.
    That would be my choice, too.

  5. Likes Kjetil Heggelund liked this post
  6. #4
    Senior Member fluteman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,810
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    Egad. Another Mozart thread.

    If I had to pick one work, it would be the String Quintet in G minor, K516. But I don't have to pick one work.
    I used to drive between NY and Chicago through the night playing a cassette of the G minor quintet over and over. There isn't a lot of music in this world that I would listen to in that way. My favorite Mozart by some way is his chamber music, followed by the last six symphonies and the operas.

  7. #5
    Senior Member Larkenfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sedona
    Posts
    4,272
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    In the master’s symphonic writing, I would rate his Jupiter Symphony as the absolute peak, particularly the fourth movement with its fugal writing: its baseline boldness, its beauty, its Bach-like rigor, its effortless Classical elegance, its confidence, its soaring emotional uplift, it’s sense of triumph, its consummate genius—the result of a lifetime of love, inspiration, and study:

    Last edited by Larkenfield; Jan-19-2019 at 03:05.
    "That's all Folks!"

  8. Likes Strange Magic, ProudSquire, jdec and 1 others liked this post
  9. #6
    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Ford Nation
    Posts
    4,719
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    His operas Marriage of Figaro, Don G, Cosi, Magic Flute. His piano concertos 20-24, 27. Piano music K475, K511. Clarinet Quintet. Symphonies 39-41.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

  10. Likes Mifek, fliege, ProudSquire and 1 others liked this post
  11. #7
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    20,003
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    ...I'm a big fan of the piano concertos as well, but I haven't heard any of the early ones (1-11).
    You may want to give Piano Concerto No. 9 "Juenehomme" a listen. It's an earlier work but is often accounted a masterpiece. Note the immediate piano entry, very unusual in those days.



  12. Likes ribonucleic liked this post
  13. #8
    Senior Member Couchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    2,860
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    On the contrary his solo keyboard work is dull to listen to and even more of a chore to play.

    As a piano student you typically have to choose between a Beethoven or Mozart sonata for exam classical-era requirements. NOBODY PICKS MOZART.

    His operas (Cosi, Figaro, Giovanni, Zauberflote) are the best of his work.
    Doch dieses Wörtlein: und, -wär' es zerstört,
    wie anders als mit Isoldes eignem Leben wär' Tristan der Tod gegeben?

  14. Likes Alinde liked this post
  15. #9
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    1,893
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you ask me which 'form of composition' (genre) has the greatest impression on me, it would be the liturgical works, (Masses, Vespers, Motet (Ave Verum Corpus), including the Masonic ones as he had been writing them all his life (quite literally)) there is a great deal of wealth in them.


    I like the energy Missa Longa K262 starts with in the Kyrie, like Mozart's other masses, it contrasts the energy of the major mode with solemn minor mode sections.


    Missa Solemnis K337 has a majestic Credo (5:40) and then an inspired soprano solo in the Sanctus (11:20) which returns after the Benedictus fugue (12:59)


    I find the Laudate Pueri Dominum from Vesperae Solennes K339 very striking. For example, listen for the middle section where Mozart inverts the subject while keeping natural flow. The use of choral, orchestral color at 3:03 inspires deep emotions of fear in me. I find the Magnificat also very majestic. https://youtu.be/XXe2W4CUMRI?t=1245

    Credo from Coronation Mass K317: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cNibz1BpYA
    Also I find Spatzenmesse K220 https://youtu.be/HlEHTy8_2qE?t=174 interesting that it contains a section in Gloria that Sussamayer later referred to in finishing the Agnus Dei of https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGn-9A4mFhw


  16. Likes Larkenfield, ribonucleic liked this post
  17. #10
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    1,893
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Couchie View Post
    On the contrary his solo keyboard work is dull to listen to and even more of a chore to play.

    As a piano student you typically have to choose between a Beethoven or Mozart sonata for exam classical-era requirements. NOBODY PICKS MOZART.

    His operas (Cosi, Figaro, Giovanni, Zauberflote) are the best of his work.
    I also used to be a piano student, I often heard discussions of Mozart being "difficult to play like a pro". https://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php?topic=901.0 K310, K333, K457, K533, K576 are actually core of piano repertoire, as well as Rondo K511, Fantasies K394, K396, K397, 475. Also, Fantasies in F minor K594, K608 are very difficult works in the organ repertoire.

    "Beethoven made his own copy of K608 and procured a copy of K.594."
    ("Automatic Genius: Mozart and the Mechanical Sublime" by Annette Richards)




    If Mozart's keyboard works are really a dull and chore to play, why would a great composer such as Beethoven pay him homage. I'm not trying to start a flame war or anything but as I said, Why does music get so angsty and dark with/after Beethoven? I think some people's notion that "music changed because of Beethoven and Beethoven only" leads some other people to think Is Beethoven over-hyped? . I believe all major composers had their parts in music history.

    Op.57: https://youtu.be/EEptNFzLpjk?t=27
    K475: https://youtu.be/zVGDgqt_kzk?t=588
    Op.57: https://youtu.be/xz7usUEPWsc?t=22
    K475: https://youtu.be/zVGDgqt_kzk?t=660

    The 3rd piano concerto 3rd movement motif: https://youtu.be/xtk1VonayZ4?t=326
    I hear K457 in Op.10 No.1 https://youtu.be/gFNzxaKQZjs?t=1900
    The start of the 'Hammerklavier' motif: https://youtu.be/NN0ZKZ274t4?t=286
    K546 (and fugue for two pianos K426) in Op.111: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bmCuPyBSAI



    "Cramer, Cramer! we shall never be able to do anything like that!" -LVB
    Last edited by hammeredklavier; Jan-19-2019 at 05:43.

  18. Likes Red Terror, Larkenfield liked this post
  19. #11
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Baarle-Nassau.
    Posts
    23,977
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    Perhaps for other no his high but I find it quit interesting work.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  20. Likes Larkenfield liked this post
  21. #12
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    8,061
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Even as pure music (rather than as dramas) his operas are too wonderful. But his symphonies - from 24 (K182) onwards - and most of his piano concertos are also wonderful. And the clarinet works. And then there is a lot of other chamber music (especially most of the quintets) ... . Actually the OP say it - he excels in most genres. So why choose? But, if you do it has to be the operas - the three Da Ponte operas, The Magic Flute, Idomeneo, La Clemenza di Tito. I am not really an opera fan but as pure music there is so much there ... and they are great to watch, too.

  22. #13
    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Czech Republic
    Posts
    4,177
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    the 6 string quintets and sinfonia concertante

  23. #14
    Senior Member Ras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    855
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm not an opera fan, so if I had to choose one genre Mozart excelled in it would be the piano concerto.
    "I only have a hunch in what I've become expert." - Leonard Cohen

  24. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larkenfield View Post
    In the master’s symphonic writing, I would rate his Jupiter Symphony as the absolute peak, particularly the fourth movement with its fugal writing: its baseline boldness, its beauty, its Bach-like rigor, its effortless Classical elegance, its confidence, its soaring emotional uplift, it’s sense of triumph, its consummate genius—the result of a lifetime of love, inspiration, and study:

    Masterful orchestral and fugal writing there, that would probably be my choice too. If not, I'd go with the Fantasia K. 475.

Page 1 of 16 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •