Banner: The Hope for brass band, organ, choir, and percussion

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Is there a name for this effect in music?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Is there a name for this effect in music?

    Okay, so I didn't know what category to post this in, so if someone could please redirect me to the correct place to ask this question, I'd very much appreciate it.

    Alright, so this has been frustrating me for quite a while. I've been analyzing a lot of the music I like listening to to see what exactly it is that makes me like them. I've noticed 2 common things:

    1) I've noticed that I like listening to pieces where there are rapid changes between low notes and high notes. I've tried looking up what the name of this effect is, but all I've found is Tremolo, which is rapidly switching between 2 different notes, and that's not the same thing I'm thinking of. I guess another way to think of it is a note bouncing up and down. Danny Elfman does a lot of this. In most of his pieces, he plays a really low note on one end of the piano and then immediately follows it with a higher pitched one. Here are some audio examples:

    https://youtu.be/HlGxcekfsho?t=37
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0uZgn1ThW50
    https://youtu.be/lHqfQRVailM?t=13
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGXV1c7VcG0
    https://youtu.be/pP-1-UQoDgI?t=38
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKN6aPuTbIA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hz5vjGPFCMQ

    So hopefully I've given enough examples that you know what I'm referring to. I've noticed that most of these are either a shift from a low note to a high note on the piano or a low, deep brassy sound (most likely a Tuba) to a quick ascending note on a string instrument

    2) The other thing I've noticed is a little more complicated to explain. It's almost indescribable, but I'm going to try my best. There's this sort of low "roaring" sound, almost like a saw cutting something or a dog barking. It's usually hidden behind some loud brass instrument. Here is an example:

    https://clyp.it/3v3b3oag

    after fiddling around with the equalizer, I was able to pinpoint the sound quality that I'm trying to describe, and amplified it around the 500 range.

    https://clyp.it/qa134fao

    Now, this is a bit different, but since it's within the same types of songs, I'd figured I'd add this too. I'm almost willing to bet that this is a string instrument, but I've been proven wrong on here multiple times so I can't say for sure. Somehow it sounds like a violin, guitar, accordion, harmonica, and horn all at once (or at least to me anyway). It has a sort of "buzz" to it that makes it sound like de-tuned strings on a guitar being strummed. Other times, it sounds like strings on a violin being bowed and then distorted. It can also sound sort of "wheezy" like an accordion or harmonica, and it also kind of reminds me of those guys that climb mountains while blowing through those long horns, making a wailing call. Here are some examples:

    After the loud brass womps in the beginning, you can hear a tail at the end of each one that sounds a bit like a squawk or an accordion letting air out. Then that same instrument (I think) plays by itself and goes back and forth between sounding like an out-of-tune guitar being strummed to a violin being bowed in an unusual way:

    https://clyp.it/cui1hwif

    I'm also fairly sure this is the same instrument. Sort of has that buzzing, loose strings sound to it...

    https://clyp.it/3bq4owrf

    Although I don't think this is the same instrument, you can hear that same sound quality in the background of this if you listen closely:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uu1pw1IcuYI

    Anyways, thank you in advance to anyone who can help me figure this out. I've been chomping at the bit to know for the longest time.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Ford Nation
    Posts
    3,874
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I liked that Beetlejuice theme as a kid. I don't believe there is a technical name. It is just a left hand bass accompaniment pattern alternating between the notes of the minor third with a few variations. Sort of like the boogie woogie but slower. The second one is even more ambiguous. It is a deep brass instrument like a tuba playing staccatos along with a riff.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

  3. Likes alanfarwell liked this post
  4. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you so much. Is there any chance you'd know the name of the instrument that sounds like a guitar or violin being strummed or bowed? I've also heard this effect in the beginning of this song too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMqC...H&index=6&t=0s

  5. #4
    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Ford Nation
    Posts
    3,874
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    That's chopping on a few higher strings like violin or viola. The real low sound resonating is a double bass.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

  6. Likes alanfarwell liked this post
  7. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    205
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alanfarwell View Post
    Thank you so much. Is there any chance you'd know the name of the instrument that sounds like a guitar or violin being strummed or bowed? I've also heard this effect in the beginning of this song too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMqC...H&index=6&t=0s

  8. Likes alanfarwell liked this post
  9. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    725
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alanfarwell View Post
    Okay, so I didn't know what category to post this in, so if someone could please redirect me to the correct place to ask this question, I'd very much appreciate it.

    Alright, so this has been frustrating me for quite a while. I've been analyzing a lot of the music I like listening to to see what exactly it is that makes me like them. I've noticed 2 common things:

    1) I've noticed that I like listening to pieces where there are rapid changes between low notes and high notes. I've tried looking up what the name of this effect is, but all I've found is Tremolo, which is rapidly switching between 2 different notes, and that's not the same thing I'm thinking of. I guess another way to think of it is a note bouncing up and down. Danny Elfman does a lot of this. In most of his pieces, he plays a really low note on one end of the piano and then immediately follows it with a higher pitched one. Here are some audio examples:
    I think the term you are looking for is "Ostinato". Some Danny Elfman examples.



    One of my favorite examples of the use of ostinato by Bernard Herrmann. His compositions also influenced the music of Elfman.

    Last edited by Alfacharger; Mar-17-2019 at 16:06.

  10. Likes alanfarwell liked this post
  11. #7
    Senior Member LezLee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Falkirk, Scotland
    Posts
    1,903
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Well, I can’t answer your questions but I really like all your examples!

  12. Likes alanfarwell liked this post
  13. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you so much. This is what I've been looking for!

  14. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Not the effect I was thinking of, but I still like that type of rhythm too. I'm referring to 2 notes or staccatos that go from really low to really high. In the Beetlejuice example, it's the mallets hitting the strings at the low end of the piano, which is immediately followed by a higher piano note with tambourine rattle layered over it.

  15. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks for listening. Glad we have similar tastes.

  16. #11
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    7,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I think what you are describing is a type of syncopated rhythm derived from polka music.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xr4zec7NQI0

  17. Likes AeolianStrains, alanfarwell liked this post
  18. #12
    Senior Member Larkenfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sedona
    Posts
    3,673
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    If it’s being written out and composed anyway rather than being spontaneously improvised, why does it need a technical name? But if the effect needed to have one, I would describe it as a ‘bouncing baseline’ because it’s done with the left-hand on the keyboard or is essentially in the base register when being orchestrated and basically alternates between two notes in a rather wide interval.
    Last edited by Larkenfield; Mar-18-2019 at 19:54.
    "That's all Folks!"

  19. Likes alanfarwell liked this post
  20. #13
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    7,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you think about that syncopated polka rhythm it naturally creates a kind of 'boom - bah' sound. I think the high and low note sequences the OP is describing are just a by-product of that particular rhythmic inflection. Ragtime music uses similar syncopation.

  21. Likes alanfarwell liked this post
  22. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Listened to the polka music. They do have similar characteristics. I just wanted to know if there was a technical name for it so I could find more music with that effect in it, since typing in "boom bah music" probably won't give me the results I want.

  23. Likes tdc liked this post
  24. #15
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    7,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alanfarwell View Post
    Listened to the polka music. They do have similar characteristics. I just wanted to know if there was a technical name for it so I could find more music with that effect in it, since typing in "boom bah music" probably won't give me the results I want.
    I see what you mean, because it is such a widely used technique even though 'syncopated polka rhythm' is essentially a correct technical term, (or just 'polka rhythm') it is not specific enough and probably won't lead to you easily finding precisely what you are looking for. Maybe there is another term I am not aware of.

    This kind of rhythm is prominently used in polka, ragtime and a multitude of other music as you have noticed. I think there are similar rhythms sometimes used in some Italian Opera like Verdi and Puccini. The track "Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)" on The Doors debut album uses the rhythm for sure. The issue here isn't so much a lack of a technical term, but the varied and widespread different uses of the technique in a lot of different styles of music. It is so ubiquitous that I think people often use it without knowing what it is, and it wouldn't surprise me if it pre dates polka music. That is just the earliest form I can directly trace it to.
    Last edited by tdc; Mar-19-2019 at 00:13.

  25. Likes alanfarwell liked this post
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •