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Thread: Should We Pay More for Classical Music?

  1. #46
    Senior Member haydnguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StrangeHocusPocus View Post
    ^Did you ever buy pianola rolls
    No, where I lived they didn't sell them but you could buy them in the big cities.
    I've found a small batch of my CD's in the garage but I know I don't have them all because I'm still missing 2 Richter box sets. Who knows what else.

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  3. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by haydnguy View Post
    No, where I lived they didn't sell them but you could buy them in the big cities.
    Any jelly rolls

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  5. #48
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zofia View Post
    @Enthusiast Of course for whatever the personal reasons there will be some who maybe could not afford it. However there are the other options for people like yourself. I am sorry if I came off as cold it was not my meaning. I was only trying to point out “a lot” of the people who I am told are poor have the most best running shoes or cell phones. They could afford it if they wanted it and yes of course there are those who cannot but regardless of price if it is unaffordable that is true for everyone.
    No, Zofia, I don't find you cold. Not exactly. But, as a politician, you need to at least sound like you care about the impact of your policy on the poor! If you don't it can come over as a bit "let them eat cake"! And, yes, poverty does exist in Western Europe even if wealthy people have little sense of it. I don't know about Germany (although I do know a very poor German - it is all spirituality with him) but in Britain there are very many very poor families and even many professionals like teachers need to use food banks (free donated food) to get by. Now, some people will say that "OK, there are poor people, but they are not the audience for classical music" and will support that argument with a stereotyped image of the poor family. But people who love classical music can be found in all socioeconomic groups.

    It would almost be true to say that music is what makes my life worth living. Even though I don't have so much money these days, I'm lucky. I can still afford to buy the odd CD and, where there is a good saving by doing so, the odd download. And for much of the last 25 years I had quite a lot of money and bought a huge number of CDs, many of which I have only listened to once or twice. In the past two years I have experienced an accelerated understanding and enjoyment of some music that I have been interested in for two decades but had not managed to fully get into (some composers who I didn't immediately take to, a lot of contemporary music and early music). Recently, and fueled by a collection of CDs that included many that I had only listened to very occasionally, a lot of that music has started to talk to me and I have come to love it. But if I didn't have a backlog of CDs to feed my developing tastes I would probably be missing out on a lot of incredible enjoyment. I would hate to see myself getting priced out of the classical music market.

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  7. #49
    Senior Member NLAdriaan's Avatar
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    As the music market is constantly changing, it now seems that the profit model of recorded music is pretty much over. This means that Live concerts are getting more important for musicians to make money. So, if you want to help musicians and yourself, go see more live concerts. It is the best way of experiencing music and it cuts out the middle man, being the record company.
    The good thing of it is that musicians can use Youtube to help their rise to fame or crowdfunding to finance a professional CD recording. And I do like that I can get CD's now for normal prices. I still remember the arrival of the CD, where ridiculous prices were asked for often half empty discs and you just couldn't afford to develop your musical taste in getting a varied discotheque. Spotify and Amazon jointly are the new record store.

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  9. #50
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    I personally would pay €30-40 for CD and have done so, even more if it is in a nice package with notes or a booklet. I would buy more music digitally if it was lossless (FLAC etc) some sites offer “Master Recording” in FLAC but this is far from the norm and certainly not a big catalog like iTunes or Amazon. Am I alone or would my fellow TC members think this would be worth while?

    That depends on your circumstances and taste. I know a lot of people visiting here don't discern differences from one recording to the next so they wouldn't pay more. I've been collecting a half century, have the economic resources to buy what I want, and often have connoisseur taste.

    I have spent as much as $150 American for rarities when only one exists on the market. To me money is not a factor when I find what I seek -- though I would never pay more than a dollar or two for a digital file. It would have to be hardcopy with at least some prospective resale value down the road.

    As an example I once paid $150 for a copy of the 4-CD version of Wendy Carlos's Switched-On Bach box set. This is a rarity still selling on Amazon USA for between $182 and $445. I found it on ebay selling between $124 and $300. I eventually made digital copies of mine, made digital and hardcopy pages of the covers and notes, bought a 4-CD box and created my own set, then sold my original for more than I paid. So I have the music and made money on my transaction.
    Last edited by larold; Yesterday at 11:40.

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  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by NLAdriaan View Post
    As the music market is constantly changing, it now seems that the profit model of recorded music is pretty much over. This means that Live concerts are getting more important for musicians to make money. So, if you want to help musicians and yourself, go see more live concerts. It is the best way of experiencing music and it cuts out the middle man, being the record company.
    The good thing of it is that musicians can use Youtube to help their rise to fame or crowdfunding to finance a professional CD recording. And I do like that I can get CD's now for normal prices. I still remember the arrival of the CD, where ridiculous prices were asked for often half empty discs and you just couldn't afford to develop your musical taste in getting a varied discotheque. Spotify and Amazon jointly are the new record store.
    I live in a small town and we do occasionally - rarely but occasionally - get classical concerts from reputable (and sometimes quite famous) performers. They sell out almost immediately. So few seem willing to step into the market that is obviously here.

  12. #52
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starthrower View Post
    I don't pay for streaming services. There's plenty of physical product to keep me waist high in recordings for the rest of my days. I don't need to listen to every other recording made.
    I use a streaming service to reduce my desire for physical product. If I listen to something on Spotify, and like it enough to play it repeatedly, I'll purchase it. Before streaming services existed, the only way for me to find out if I liked something was to purchase it.

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  14. #53
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zofia View Post
    I personally would pay €30-40 for CD and have done so, even more if it is in a nice package with notes or a booklet. I would buy more music digitally if it was lossless (FLAC etc) some sites offer “Master Recording” in FLAC but this is far from the norm and certainly not a big catalog like iTunes or Amazon.

    Am I alone or would my fellow TC members think this would be worth while?
    I don't think that you're alone, but I suspect that most people here are like me. I have a very, very large collection of recorded music, mostly CD's. I doubt that I've spent more than $20 on a single CD or LP more than handful of times, and those have invariably been items that are long OOP and seemed unlikely for reissue. And in almost every case, including the $110 I paid for an obscure Russian recording of Winterreise, I've been proved wrong.

    There are very, very few musicians whose recordings I'd pay the sort of premium that you suggest. If I'm going to shell out $40-50, I'd rather spend it on a live performance.

    I don't think that most musicians expect to make a lot of money for their recordings - whether they should or not is another topic. Instead, I think that most use recordings as ways to get themselves into the public eye and attract an audience for their live performances.

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  16. #54
    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    When I first saw this thread in the listing, I thought it said "Should We PRAY More for Classical Music."
    "The way out is through the door. Why is it that no one will use this method?"
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    Senior Member MatthewWeflen's Avatar
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    I think we should pay more for music in general. $40 per CD? No. But $10-$15 perhaps.

    With that said, given the plethora of used options out there, it's very hard to say no to a $6 CD that plays just as well as a new one.

    When downloadable hi-res music can be had for a reasonable price (say, $15 per album), I feel pretty good about buying it. But $25 and up is too much for a hour of music in my book.

  18. #56
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    I purchase all my CD’s used (sometimes I get a new one sold as new) on eBay cheap. I’ve also getting back into vinyl and buy those pretty darn cheap on eBay as well. I just bought 15 used LP’s this past weekend, all in VG to mint condition for $60 +/- including shipping. All classical selections.

    It is unfortunate that sales of new CD’s is very very small and many are paying for quality streaming instead (myself included) or using ‘free’ services. But when I really want something, I’ll try to find it on a physical medium, as I like to have the ‘hard copy’ no matter the quality of streaming. New vinyl is ridiculously expensive, and unfortunately not up to standards of the older stuff of 35-50 years ago.

    In reality though, streaming is the direction music is heading, but there will always be those small selected few that will continue to put out quality CD’s or vinyl. Regardless if it’s classical or not, those will cost a premium, so many are more than happy to spend $20-25 a month for a quality streaming service, and have thousands of selections literally at their fingertips instead of purchasing separate CD’s or LP’s.
    Last edited by Bkeske; Yesterday at 21:19.

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    Quote Originally Posted by haydnguy View Post
    I keep saying this but this will be the last time. Either buy CD's or stream. Never purchase a download and store it on your computer or external hard drive.

    The minute your computer get's hit with Ransomware or some other type of malware your whole music collection could be toast. Many times when your computer actually gets infected, you won't know it. The first sign might be that your computer runs slower than normal.

    People routinely have much more important files on their computer than music recordings. The correct answer is to have a proper back-up strategy, not avoid buying downloads because you're worried about a totally preventable problem. If you're backed up and you get hit then just wipe the drive and restore from the last known good back-up.

  20. #58
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    $40 for a classical disc? Not a chance. What a great way to price classical music out of the grasp of people with less money and set it apart from standard music punters. I've never paid more than £20 for any single classical cd and the most I've paid for a box set is £60. As CDs are slowly dying they're getting cheaper. There's no way I'm coughing out more and being penalised for buying the music I love. Charging too much for CDs just causes more piracy.
    Last edited by Merl; Yesterday at 23:21.

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  22. #59
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkasimer View Post
    I use a streaming service to reduce my desire for physical product. If I listen to something on Spotify, and like it enough to play it repeatedly, I'll purchase it. Before streaming services existed, the only way for me to find out if I liked something was to purchase it.
    I loved that aspect of record buying. I did it hundreds of times. Only ended up with a clunker on rare occasions.
    Short-term thinkers are rewarded with reelection, while those who dare to take seriously our responsibility to future generations commonly find themselves out of office.

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    Senior Member NLAdriaan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkasimer View Post
    I use a streaming service to reduce my desire for physical product. If I listen to something on Spotify, and like it enough to play it repeatedly, I'll purchase it. Before streaming services existed, the only way for me to find out if I liked something was to purchase it.
    With streaming services, we became less dependent on reviewers and informed musicstores. Combined with the unlimited storage of online stores, you can now find the lowest price for any CD you are looking for. TC sometimes also is a great help in finding new music or appreciating your existing music collection. Although I do find it sad that my favourite music stores are closing down, as a result of all this.

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