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Thread: Vocal recitals.

  1. #166
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post
    I used to have the De Los Angeles and Schwarzkopf Introuvables sets on LP, both excellent. There were others devoted to the Ring, Verdi and Mozart. An excellent series though most of them didn't make it to CD I believe.
    I think that most of them were issued on CD, but many were only as European imports in the USA. As far as I can tell, the Schwarzkopf and VdLA sets were never issued at all. The Verdi and Mozart were certainly distributed in the USA, but I don't believe that the RING set was - I got my copy at Tower as an import.

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  3. #167
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    These recordings were all made in the 1930s and so pre-date the two disc set of French song I reviewed a few months ago, with the second part of the disc being taken from a 1937 radio broadcast. One of the songs (Armstrong Gibbs' The fields are full of summer still) was newly discovered in 2001 and first published on this CD.

    We start with one of Dame Maggie's most famous performances, that of Périchole's Tu n'es pas beau, sung with great affection, a twinkle in the eye and with that wonderful dip into her inimitably glorious chest voice. Though a light soprano with pure, firm top notes, Teyte's lower register was admirably rich and full in a manner we rarely hear today, more's the pity. The orchestra here sounds like a palm court orchestra at a tea dance, but the singing is another matter entirely and alone well worth the price of the disc. The two excerpts from Messager's Véronique, which follow are almost as good.

    Teyte was particularly renowned for her interpretations of French song, but we are vouchsafed only two (very well known) songs from that field, Fauré's Après un rêve and Hahn's Si mes vers avaient des ailes. The Fauré is much better than the one on the French song disc mentioned above, where I felt she fussed with the song too much making it lose its natural flow, and the Hahn is as lovely as the later recording with Gerald Moore. These are followed by two Dvorak songs, Christina's Lament, which turns out to be his Humoresque arranged for voice and piano, and the ubiquitous Songs my mother taught me, both beautifully sung.

    These are followed by a group of songs from light musicals, mementoes of her days spent in British Music Hall. They may be musically slight, but Deep in my heart, dear from Romberg's The Student Prince was actually one of Dame Maggie's favourite recordings. It crests with a high B, which she thought the most beautiful note she had ever recorded. Certainly the note rings out clear and clean as a bell.

    The lion's share of the disc, however, is given over to a 1937 BBC broadcast recital, which couples popular songs by Schumann and Brahms to a group of English songs by turn of the century composers Quilter, Bridge, Delius, Armstrong Gibbs and (completely new to me) Amherst Webber and Graham Peel. As ever, the voice is bright and pure, her manner direct and disarming, her diction and intonation well-nigh perfect. Admittedly, there are aspects of her singing which some might find quaint and old fashioned today, but her technique is superb and her voice remained firm and clear well into her sixties.

    Perhaps because of some of the material, this is not quite so recommendable as the EMI two disc set of French songs, but I would never want to be without it, if only for the wonderful aria from La Périchole.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

  4. #168
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Rossini: Arias from La Donna Del Lago, Otello, Stabat Mater, Armida, Tancredi and L'assedio di Corinto
    Donizetti: Arias from Belisario, Parisina d'Este. Torquato Tasso, Gemma di Vergy
    Verdi: Arias from Un Giorno di Regno, I Lombardi, I due Foscari, Alzira, Attila, Il Corsaro and Aroldo


    These two discs bring together the three LPs of bel canto Rarities Montserrat Caballé recorded shortly after she rocketed to stardom singing Lucrezia in Lucrezia Borgia at Carnegie Hall in 1965, a last minute replacement for an ailing Marilyn Horne. Each record was devoted to a different composer. The first two, Rossini and early Verdi, were recorded in Italy in 1967 with the RCA Italiana Chorus and Orchestra and the Donizetti with the London Symphony Orchestra and Ambrosian Opera Chorus in 1969. Carlo Felice Cillario was the conductor for the Rossini and Donizetti, Anton Guadagno for the Verdi and the luxury presentation included other singers in the various comprimario roles.

    The material was even rarer back then than it is now as vary few of the works represented had ever been recorded, Caballé herself being one of the singers who spearheaded the bel canto revival that occurred after Callas had opened the doors to this repertoire in the previous decade.

    These were the years of Caballé's absolute peak and the voice is in superb condition, without a trace of the hardness that coud afflict her loud high notes in later years. Her breath control is prodigious, but she doesn't over-exploit her fabulous high pianissimi, which she tended to do in later years, and her singing has an energy and attack which you might find surprising if you only know her from her later recordings, when she tended to slow everything down until it practically came to a halt. If she has a fault, it is that her trills are a little sketchy and occasionally one hears the slight suspicion of an aspirate, but the singing is surpassingly beautiful throughout its range, her legato excellent and the voice even from top to bottom. Characterisation might not be her strong point, but she is always alive to the dramatic situation and her singing is both involved and involving.

    The arias on each disc are well chosen and the whole enterprise exudes class. I really can't think of any singer today who could match her in this repertoire, maybe DiDonato in the Rossini and Donizetti, though she lacks Caballé's arrestingly beautiful sound. As for Verdi, well we do seem to be experiencing a dearth of good Verdi singers today.

    These two discs are a superb memento of a great singer at the height of her powers and should be in the collection of any vocal connoisseur. This particular release comes with full notes, texts and translations which are hardly to be taken for granted these days. Highly recommended.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

  5. #169
    Senior Member MAS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post


    Rossini: Arias from La Donna Del Lago, Otello, Stabat Mater, Armida, Tancredi and L'assedio di Corinto
    Donizetti: Arias from Belisario, Parisina d'Este. Torquato Tasso, Gemma di Vergy
    Verdi: Arias from Un Giorno di Regno, I Lombardi, I due Foscari, Alzira, Attila, Il Corsaro and Aroldo


    These two discs bring together the three LPs of bel canto Rarities Montserrat Caballé recorded shortly after she rocketed to stardom singing Lucrezia in Lucrezia Borgia at Carnegie Hall in 1965, a last minute replacement for an ailing Marilyn Horne. Each record was devoted to a different composer. The first two, Rossini and early Verdi, were recorded in Italy in 1967 with the RCA Italiana Chorus and Orchestra and the Donizetti with the London Symphony Orchestra and Ambrosian Opera Chorus in 1969. Carlo Felice Cillario was the conductor for the Rossini and Donizetti, Anton Guadagno for the Verdi and the luxury presentation included other singers in the various comprimario roles.

    The material was even rarer back then than it is now as vary few of the works represented had ever been recorded, Caballé herself being one of the singers who spearheaded the bel canto revival that occurred after Callas had opened the doors to this repertoire in the previous decade.

    These were the years of Caballé's absolute peak and the voice is in superb condition, without a trace of the hardness that coud afflict her loud high notes in later years. Her breath control is prodigious, but she doesn't over-exploit her fabulous high pianissimi, which she tended to do in later years, and her singing has an energy and attack which you might find surprising if you only know her from her later recordings, when she tended to slow everything down until it practically came to a halt. If she has a fault, it is that her trills are a little sketchy and occasionally one hears the slight suspicion of an aspirate, but the singing is surpassingly beautiful throughout its range, her legato excellent and the voice even from top to bottom. Characterisation might not be her strong point, but she is always alive to the dramatic situation and her singing is both involved and involving.

    The arias on each disc are well chosen and the whole enterprise exudes class. I really can't think of any singer today who could match her in this repertoire, maybe DiDonato in the Rossini and Donizetti, though she lacks Caballé's arrestingly beautiful sound. As for Verdi, well we do seem to be experiencing a dearth of good Verdi singers today.

    These two discs are a superb memento of a great singer at the height of her powers and should be in the collection of any vocal connoisseur. This particular release comes with full notes, texts and translations which are hardly to be taken for granted these days. Highly recommended.
    I treasure this collection. Unfortunately, DiDonato suffers in comparison. I think she is unsuited to Donizetti (the timbre sounds “wrong” to me in Bellini, too) but is fine in Rossini. I like her in Händel, too, to which Caballé does not not do justice.

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  7. #170
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAS View Post
    I treasure this collection. Unfortunately, DiDonato suffers in comparison. I think she is unsuited to Donizetti (the timbre sounds “wrong” to me in Bellini, too) but is fine in Rossini. I like her in Händel, too, to which Caballé does not not do justice.
    One of my most memorable evenings in the theatre was an Aix-en-Provence production of Hercules which came to the Barbican in London and in which DiDonato was a searing Dejanira. The character's descent into madness was brilliantly conveyed. It was quite simply one of the greatest performances I have ever seen on the operatic stage.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  9. #171
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    I saw Didonato in Covent Garden recently as Agrippina. She's an incredibly gripping performer, even if the voice is not always beautiful (where have we heard that before?).

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  11. #172
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    By 1964 Callas had all but retired from musical life. In 1961 she recorded her first disc of French arias, sang in performances of Medea at Epidaurus in Greece and at La Scala and a single concert performance in London. In 1962, she did even less; a short concert tour, taking in London and cities in Germany, plus a couple of arias for a BBC TV appearance. 1963 saw more concerts in Berlin, Dusseldorf, Stuttgart, London, Copenhagen and Paris, plus more recording sessions of French arias at the beginning year. At the end of the year and at the beginning of 1964 she embarked on more intensive recording activity, possibly in preparation for her upcoming retur to the operatic stage in Tosca and Norma. Three discs were issued in 1964, one of classical arias by Mozart, Beethoven and Weber, one of arias by Rossini and Donizetti, and one of Verdi arias, with more of the Verdi sessions being released in 1972, shortly after she emerged from self-imposed exile to teach a series of masterclasses at the Juilliard School in New York. Though more of these sessions, plus some made in 1969, were eventually released after her death, these were the only ones she agreed to.

    Though all three of the discs issued in 1964 revealed some pronounced vocal problems, the Verdi disc is by far the most successful. She seems less preoccupied with her vocal problems, more engaged with the material and consequently the singing has a freedom that is lacking in the other two discs, though this does mean we also get quite a few squally notes above the stave.

    Desdemona's Willow Song and Ave Maria might be considered an uncharacteristic piece for Callas, but she is alive to every shift of mood. As it rarely strays above the stave it also presents her with the least problems vocally. It is a great pity EMI didn't think to emply someone to sing Emilia's lines, but Callas skillfully uses a different tone for the comments to Emilia from the one she uses for Barbara's song. Throughout one feels Desdemona's anxiety, which erupts with a sudden passionate outburst when she bids Emilia goodbye. The Ave Maria profits from her deep legato, the final Ab spun out in the best tradition.

    Both of the Aroldo arias are thrilling, especially Mina's Act III solo, a superb piece which Callas fills with drama and significance, bringing the cabaletta to a rousing conclusion.

    Elisabetta's Non pianger mia compagna from Don Carlo doesn't really come off. Though her legato is still excellent, she sounds strained here and she can't float the climactic phrases as she should. Eboli's O don fatale, though, is another matter entirely. The whole aria brims with contrast and drama, and one registers each change of expression. She vehemently launches into the opening section, spitting out the words ti maledico, but then moulds rather than sings the o mia regina section, her rich lower register digging deep into its melancholy. Finally as she realises she still has time to save Carlo, she brings the aria to an ecstatic close. OK, so there are a couple of off centre high notes, but they fade into insignifance next to the thrilling commitment of the singing.

    When I reviewed all three of these 1963 recitals back in January 2017, I mentioned that my wobble tolerance could vary from listen to listen. Sometimes I find the acidulous tone and stridency hard to take; on others I barely notice them as I get wrapped up in the musical imagination. It's safe to say that on this occasion the latter reaction was in play.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  13. #173
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    So what more can one say about this famous two disc recital? It was recorded in 1960, not long after Dame Joan had enjoyed a spectacular success in Lucia di Lammermoor, in 1959, at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. She was already 33 and had been a member of the company since 1952, when she had sung Clotilde to Callas's Norma and the Priestess in Aida. She had sung a wide number of roles there, including Agathe, the Countess, Gilda, Pamina, Eva and even Lady Rich in Gloriana and Jennifer in Tippett's The Midsummer Marriage, but none of these undertakings had prepared anyone for the spectacular success she would have as Lucia, with Serafin, Callas's mentor, in the pit. The role became her calling card and shortly afterwards she sang it in Paris, at La Scala and at the Met, performances that put her firmly on the map and paved the way for the direction her career would take. Thereafter she concentrated almost exclusively on the bel canto repertoire and many operas were resurrected specifically for her.

    Let us try and listen now with fresh ears, as if, for instance, this was the work of a singer new to us today. First impressions would be of the beauty of the voice, the fullness of tone, the ease on high and the way those top notes ring out with brilliance but without a hint of shrillness. We would also notice the rocketing virtuosity and the stunningly accurate coloratura. She also sings with feeling, but the first impressions are definitely vocal. This is an exceptional instrument used with great technical accomplishment. What I don't think we quite get is a true impression of the size of the voice, which, according to all who heard her in the theatre, was quite exceptional.

    Some of the arias (particularly the opening track, Arne's The soldier tir'd, Handel's Let the bright Seraphim and Semiramide's Bel raggio) have become yardsticks against which all subsequent comers might be judged, and almost all the others would no doubt be considered amongst the best versions available. Vocally she has few limitations, though these might include a relative weakness in the lower register. Nor is she ever likely to suddenly throw into relief a word or a phrase and her diction, though a lot better than it was later to become is not particularly clear. We might also note that characterisation is not her strong point. As one aria follows another there is little to distinguish one character from another. We do not get a gallery of different people, as one would with a Callas or a Schwarzkopf.

    For many these reservations will not be a problem and of course there is a great deal of pleasure to be had from the purely visceral experience of hearing such a beautiful voice in full bloom tackling with accomplishment a wide range of music. For others, and I would count myself among them, that certain sameness of interpretation will be a problem and I for one prefer to listen to the recital piecemeal rather than all in one sitting. When listening in sequence, I start out being stunned by the singing but, after a while, my mind starts to wander as one interpretation emerges much the same as the one before. The best arias are, as I intimated above, those in which Sutherland can display her amazing vocal dexterity.

    Going back to first impressions, though. There is, as far as I'm aware, nobody singing today who can even approach the accomplishment of what Sutherland achieves here. This two disc stands as testament to her greatness, before the mannerisms (the poor diction, the mushy middle voice, the droopy portamenti) became apparent and should be in the collection of all those interested in singers and singing.
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Dec-22-2019 at 21:11.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  15. #174
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    ^^^Beautiful commentary. It takes me back to my hearing of this collection in my teens, and I'm happy to be reminded of what an impression it made on a newcomer to opera. I confess to having lost interest in Sutherland as the years passed, but I always enjoy going back to some of her early recordings to hear her at her amazing best.

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