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Thread: Vocal recitals.

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    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Lucia Popp, who tragically died of brain cancer at the age of 54, is one of those sopranos everyone seems to love, and with good reason. She had a winning personality, an immediately recognisable voice of great beauty and a rare gift for communication.

    She made her debut at the age of 23, a light coloratura, singing roles such as the Queen of the Night, Blonde, Zerlina, Despina, Sophie, Oscar and Susanna, but by her 30s had moved on to the lyric repertoire and her roles would henceforth be Pamina, the Countess or the Marschallin. She was also active on the concert patform and was a superb recitalist, and this compilation, taken from her EMI recordings, is a good example of her work in all fields.

    Disc 1 concentrates on works with orchestra starting with a lovely rendition of Rusalka's Song to the Moon, taken from a 1988 recital of Slavonic Arias. She is ideal in the two Smetana arias too, but the Letter Scene from Eugene Onegin, which closes disc 1, ideally requires a fuller tone. One appreciates the fullness of heart nonetheless.

    Gorgeous in every way are the exceprts from the Frühbeck de Burgos recording of Carmina Burana, no doubt the main reason many of us consider his recording a first choice for the work. I was lucky enough to hear Popp sing Strauss's Vier letzte Lieder under Tennstedt at the Royal Festival Hall in the early 1980s and their 1982 recording has long been considered a top recommendation for the work, so it is good to have it here included in its entirety. A further reminder of their artistic collaboration is the inclusion of the fourth movement of Mahler's Symphony no 4, where Popp strikes and ideal note of childlike innocence.

    Disc 2 starts with some 1967 recordings of Handel and continues with Mozart, taken both from complete recordings and a 1983 recital, so we get examples of her Queen of the Night under Klemperer and her Pamina under Haitink (both often considered touch stones for the roles). I don't know if she ever sang Donna Anna on stage and I'm not sure the voice would ever have been right for the role. None the less the line in Non mi dir is beautifully sustained and the coloratura section cleanly articulated in a way heavier voices don't often achieve. The Schubert songs expose a slight lack of colour, and we note that she is better at expressing joy as in Die Forelle and An Sylvia than the drama inherent in Gretchen am Spinnrade. On the other hand that fullness of heart I spoke about earlier suits Strauss's Zueignung to perfection.

    If one were to find any other fault, it would be to note that her legato is not always perfect. She has a tendency to use what John Steane once referred to as the squeeze-box method of production, where each individual note is given a slight push which impedes the long legato line. One might also note that the voice lost some of its silvery purity in the later recordings. She was a considerable artist, nonetheless, and this compendium, which finishes with Popp letting her hair down in arias from Die lustige Witwe and Die Fledermaus can be considered to live up to its title.
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Jul-01-2019 at 10:44.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    If we are to say goodbye to Renée Fleming the opera singer, then now might be a good time to be reminded of this, one of her most successful recital discs, recorded in 1996, when Fleming was at the height of her powers, and before the tendency to indulge in jazzy slides and swoops had become too pronounced.

    All but one of the roles represented here were part of her stage repertoire at the time, and she would in fact go on to sing Strauss's Daphne in 2005.

    The programme is both varied and interesting. We start with both of Countess Almavivas arias from Le Nozze di Figaro, sung with ideal poise and beauty of tone, before plunging into the romantic imaginings of Tchaikovsky's lovelorn Tatyana. Fleming plays the ardently impulsive young girl to the life. She yearns indwardly in Rusalka's Song to the Moon, and I doubt I have ever heard Ellen's Embroidery Aria from Peter Grimes sung with such superb control and feeling. Desdemona's Willow Song and Ave Maria crops up on many recitals, but Fleming does not suffer at all by comparison with such well known interpreters as Rethberg, Ponselle or Tebaldi.

    I suppose the two cornerstones of Fleming's repertoire have been Mozart and Strauss, so it is fitting that, having started with Mozart, we should finish with Struass, a suitably ecstatic version of the closing scene from Daphne.

    The recital is beautifully presented with Larissa Diadkova contributing as Filipyevna and Emilia and Jonathan Summers as Balstrode. The London Symphony Orchestra under Solti provide excellent support.

    The only criticism I would have is that her diction is not always as good as it might be, but in all other respects this is a classic recital disc.
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Jul-06-2019 at 01:12.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Rosa Ponselle is known for having one of the most extraordinary voices ever to be recorded. Along with Caruso and Ruffo, she was one of Serafin's "three miracles" and had a voice of unparalleled richness and power. According to Walter Legge, the voice was "majestic, enormously rich in overtones. Her legato was perfect with a breath control that only makes the listener breathless with amazement."

    Her career was not long, and she retired relatively early at the age of 40. Some say her withdrawal from the stage was precipitated by adverse criticisms for her Carmen, but it could just as well have been put down to her shrinking top register. The rest of the voice remained admirably secure and rich however, and recordings made at her villa in the 1950s reveal it still to be firm as a rock, though she hadn't sung in public for many years.

    Her first recordings were acoustics made for Columbia, but she switched to Victor in 1923, when from 1925, her recordings were made using the electrical process, and all the recordings here have been produced by Ward Marston. The collection gathers together just one recording of every Verdi extract Ponselle recorded, so there are no duplications and, where she did record an extract twice, Marston has chosen whichever he considered to be the best, regardless of whether it was acoustic or electrical.

    If we are to think of the ideal Verdi soprano, then Ponselle is undoubtedly the voice to which one would turn, its timbre rich and velvety with ample reserves of power, admirably firm but flexible, limpid and responsive. If there are any faults, they tend to be attributable to the recording process and the strictures of side lengths, thus the recitative to the Ernani aria is somehwat perfunctory and rushed where Callas is incredibly detailed with a much greater range of tone colour.

    I wonder too about pitch. Ponselle was known to occasionally employ downward transpositions, so would D'amor sull'ali rosee (recorded acoustically in 1918) be sung at pitch, gven the fact she opts for the optional high Db? It is a lovely performance, the high notes poised and beautifully integrated into the line, so maybe questions of pitch don't really matter, though they would affect the sound of the voice itself.

    Nevertheless all the performances here could be considered models of Verdi style, not only the arias, but the duets with Martinelli, Pinza and Stracciari and the final trio from La Forza del Destino with both Martinelli and Pinza, surely one of the greatest versions of ths scene ever committed to disc. Other favourites for me would be the Miserere (with Martinelli) which exploits her gloriously rich lower register and La vergine degli angeli from La Forza del Destino, her legato perfect and the line spun out on a pure, firm thread of sound the likes of which you will not hear from any other singer.

    Of course Ponselle was much more than a Verdi soprano, as we know from recordings of excerpts from Norma, La Gioconda and L'Africaine, as well as songs, but it is good to have here a collection of Verdi arias sug by arguably the greatest Verdi soprano of the twentieth century.
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Jul-07-2019 at 14:41.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post


    A four disc set that collects together all five of Leontyne Price's Prima Donna recital records proves to be a variable pleasure.

    Full review on my blog https://tsaraslondon.wordpress.com/2...na-collection/
    Tsaraslondon I enjoyed your review of the Leontyne Price album, but I wish you had a proofreader ... a lot of words are misspelled due to randomly dropped single letters, including Prma Donna, for example. Thank you.

    Kind regards,

    George

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    Senior Member Barelytenor's Avatar
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    And above, sug, favourtes, somehwat ... nonetheless wonderful content. Substantively, I wish you had mentioned Price's managing to ascend to a high E at the end of Caro nome, an incredible feat that made me realize many years ago just how solid her technique was, a voice that seldom went above high C. But you are right, very much a mixed blessing with little differentiation among styles.

    Kind regards,

    George

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    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barelytenor View Post
    And above, sug, favourtes, somehwat ... nonetheless wonderful content. Substantively, I wish you had mentioned Price's managing to ascend to a high E at the end of Caro nome, an incredible feat that made me realize many years ago just how solid her technique was, a voice that seldom went above high C. But you are right, very much a mixed blessing with little differentiation among styles.

    Kind regards,

    George
    Sorry about the typos. I do read through my posts before posting, but don't always see the typos until days later, when it's too late to edit my post.

    Price also recorded Sempre libera complete with high Eb, but I don't think there are any known instances of her singing these high notes outside the studio, which makes me wonder if a certain amount of jiggery pokery went on. I suppose I should have mentioned that ascent to a high E, but, regardless of the feat of doing it, I don't like it, nor did I like it when Callas did it in Mexico in 1952. It spoils the rapturous close of the aria. As always Verdi knew best. Nor does Price sound anything like a young, virginal girl in love. The sound is altogether too mature and weighted with overtones. One of my least favourite performances in the set.
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Jul-07-2019 at 16:06.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post

    Rosa Ponselle is known for having one of the most extraordinary voices ever to be recorded. Along with Caruso and Ruffo, she was one of Serafin's "three miracles" and had a voice of unparalleled richness and power. According to Walter Legge, the voice was "majestic, enormously rich in overtones. Her legato was perfect with a breath control that only makes the listener breathless with amazement."

    Her career was not long, and she retired relatively early at the age of 40. Some say her withdrawal from the stage was precipitated by adverse criticisms for her Carmen, but it could just as well have been put down to her shrinking top register. The rest of the voice remained admirably secure and rich however, and recordings made at her villa in the 1950s reveal it still to be firm as a rock, though she hadn't sung in public for many years.
    Many thanks GM for doing a portrait of Miss Ponselle who is of particular interest to Callas fans since Maria mentions her as an inspiration of her own. When dealing with singers of this era we should be aware of recording technology shifting from acoustic (mechanical horn) to electrical (microphones and amplifiers) in late 1920s, and also the physical time limitations of 78rpm disc media (4-4.5 minutes per side) which can influence which songs are chosen or edits that must be used, in actual live performance the singer would have more artistic freedom......but these are priceless moments in time we can revisit and marvel at the artistry of these icons

    Ponselle does have three operas that were live MET radio broadcasts in 1930s (including Carmen) and from the transcription discs we do have a 1935 Traviata available to revisit to hear her in a more complete performance setting.....

    I do wish the good people at "prima voce" would collect all those individual CDs of great early singers and issue a golden era complete boxset or start a youtube channel (who needs CD sales ha ha).....

    Last edited by DarkAngel; Jul-08-2019 at 06:34.

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    "Great Moments" is the title of this three disc compilation, issued in 2000, and EMI certainly had a great deal to choose from. Nicolai Gedda must be one of the most recorded tenors in history. I suppose one should point out that the "moments" here are all purely operatic. To get a more rounded view of Gedda's range, both in range and repertoire, one would have to include his work in orotorio and song, embracing music from Bach to the present day, as well as some operetta. But this is a sensible conflation of music from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, covering twenty years of recording from 1952 to 1974.

    Gedda was a keen linguist and sang virtually without accent in French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, English and his native Swedish. This linguistic ability no doubt also informed the vast range of music and styles he was able to embrace. It certainly makes for a pleasingly varied selection of excerpts.

    Disc one is made up, mostly, of the earliest material, hence we have excerpts from his splendid Dimitri on the 1952 Dobrowen recording of Boris Godunov (with Eugenia Zareska) and the whole of his first recital for EMI, recorded in 1953. A further excerpt from Boris Godunov from a 1969 recital is included, along with an aria from Rimsky-Korsakov's May Night which shows the voice virtually unchanged in seventeen years, though the style is possibly a little more assertive.

    The 1953 recital is a real treasure-trove of delights, opening with a version of Lensky's Act II aria, which is so beautiful that it bears comparison with Sobinov. He sings it as an inner monologue, the pianissimo reprise spun out in mastery fashion. Also wonderful are his honeyed performance of Du pauvre seul ami fidèle from Auber's La Muette de Portici and the glorious mezza voce legato of Nadir's Au fond du temple saint. The other French items are just as desirable, but he also delivers an ardently poetic Cielo e mar from Ponchielli's La Gioconda and his sadly restrained performane of Federico's Lament from Cilea's L'Arlesiana. Some may prefer a more overtly passionate rendering in the manner of Corelli, but personally I find Gedda's vocal restraint quite refreshing and not in the least bit unemtional. This first disc ends with a joyfully ebullient version of Mes amis, écoutez l'histoire from Adam's Le postillon de Lonjumeau, sung in Swedish and recorded live in 1952.

    Disc 2 is also wide ranging, starting with music by Rousseau, Gluck (Gedda coping superbly with the high tessitura of Gluck's tenor version of Orphée et Eurydice) and Mozart, before moving on to the German Romantic repertoire. Taken from a 1957 recital disc, Don Ottavio's arias and Tamino's Dies Bildnis ist bezaubernd schön are much better than on the complete Klemperer recordings, with a lovely smile in the tone for Tamino's aria. Belmonte's Ich baue ganz, recorded in 1967 with the Bath Festival Orchestra under Sir Yehudi Menuhin and sung in impeccable English, is brilliantly done. Exciting performances of Huon's arias from Oberon lead us into the German Romantics. Gedda only once sang Lohengrin on stage, but decided that Wagner wasn't for him. His lyrical approach to In fernem Land and Mein lieber Schwann is very beautfiful nonetheless.

    Best of all on this second disc is a magical performance of Magische Töne, sung in a ravishing mezza voce of ineffable sweetness, the long legato line beautifully and firmly held. This is great singing, no doubt about it.

    Disc 3 is of French and Italian arias and duets. It starts with a superb performance of La gloire était ma seule idole from Berlioz's Benvenuto Cellini, a role Gedda made very much his own and of course later recorded complete under Sir Colin Davis. Next comes a dramatic version of Un autre est son époux from Werther, the joyful Aubade from Lalo's Le Roi d'Ys, and the Raoul/Marguerite duet from Les Huguenots (with Mady Mesplé) with Arnold's Asil hérèditaire from Rossini's Guillaume Tell, with its fabulously ringing top notes, leading us into the Italian bel canto items.

    Mirella Freni joins him for duets from La Sonnambula, Lucia di Lammermoor and Don Pasquale whilst alone he sings Edgardo's Tombe degli avi miei and Ernesto's Cercherò lontana terra. The Bellini had me wishing he had been engaged for Callas's studio recording of La Sonnambula rather than the ineffectual Monti. After all he had already sung Narciso in her recording of Il Turco in Italia.

    Freni, who had yet to venture into more dramatic repertoire, blends well with Gedda in the duets, but back in 1966 she had yet to learn how to project personality in a recording. Her singing is lovely but a little anonymous. Both the solo items could be considered models of bel canto style but are also sung with appreciation of the dramatic situation, the recitatives vividly delivered.

    To finish we have a clutch of encores, including Lara's Granada and the lovely Berceuse from Godard's Jocelyn, which give us a glimpse of Gedda's prowess in lighter fare and remind us of that Gedda also recorded a lot of operetta.

    Given Gedda was such a prolific recording artist, there was a lot to choose from when compiling a set of Great Moments, and no doubt the set could have extended to many more discs. There is no doubt, though, that EMI have chosen some plums from his discography and there isn't a dud performance on the whole set. Extravagantly recommended.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post




    "Great Moments" is the title of this three disc compilation, issued in 2000, and EMI certainly had a great deal to choose from. Nicolai Gedda must be one of the most recorded tenors in history. I suppose one should point out that the "moments" here are all purely operatic. To get a more rounded view of Gedda's range, both in range and repertoire, one would have to include his work in orotorio and song, embracing music from Bach to the present day, as well as some operetta. But this is a sensible conflation of music from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, covering twenty years of recording from 1952 to 1974.

    Gedda was a keen linguist and sang virtually without accent in French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, English and his native Swedish. This linguistic ability no doubt also informed the vast range of music and styles he was able to embrace. It certainly makes for a pleasingly varied selection of excerpts.

    Disc one is made up, mostly, of the earliest material, hence we have excerpts from his splendid Dimitri on the 1952 Dobrowen recording of Boris Godunov (with Eugenia Zareska) and the whole of his first recital for EMI, recorded in 1953. A further excerpt from Boris Godunov from a 1969 recital is included, along with an aria from Rimsky-Korsakov's May Night which shows the voice virtually unchanged in seventeen years, though the style is possibly a little more assertive.

    The 1953 recital is a real treasure-trove of delights, opening with a version of Lensky's Act II aria, which is so beautiful that it bears comparison with Sobinov. He sings it as an inner monologue, the pianissimo reprise spun out in mastery fashion. Also wonderful are his honeyed performance of Du pauvre seul ami fidèle from Auber's La Muette de Portici and the glorious mezza voce legato of Nadir's Au fond du temple saint. The other French items are just as desirable, but he also delivers an ardently poetic Cielo e mar from Ponchielli's La Gioconda and his sadly restrained performane of Federico's Lament from Cilea's L'Arlesiana. Some may prefer a more overtly passionate rendering in the manner of Corelli, but personally I find Gedda's vocal restraint quite refreshing and not in the least bit unemtional. This first disc ends with a joyfully ebullient version of Mes amis, écoutez l'histoire from Adam's Le postillon de Lonjumeau, sung in Swedish and recorded live in 1952.

    Disc 2 is also wide ranging, starting with music by Rousseau, Gluck (Gedda coping superbly with the high tessitura of Gluck's tenor version of Orphée et Eurydice) and Mozart, before moving on to the German Romantic repertoire. Taken from a 1957 recital disc, Don Ottavio's arias and Tamino's Dies Bildnis ist bezaubernd schön are much better than on the complete Klemperer recordings, with a lovely smile in the tone for Tamino's aria. Belmonte's Ich baue ganz, recorded in 1967 with the Bath Festival Orchestra under Sir Yehudi Menuhin and sung in impeccable English, is brilliantly done. Exciting performances of Huon's arias from Oberon lead us into the German Romantics. Gedda only once sang Lohengrin on stage, but decided that Wagner wasn't for him. His lyrical approach to In fernem Land and Mein lieber Schwann is very beautfiful nonetheless.

    Best of all on this second disc is a magical performance of Magische Töne, sung in a ravishing mezza voce of ineffable sweetness, the long legato line beautifully and firmly held. This is great singing, no doubt about it.

    Disc 3 is of French and Italian arias and duets. It starts with a superb performance of La gloire était ma seule idole from Berlioz's Benvenuto Cellini, a role Gedda made very much his own and of course later recorded complete under Sir Colin Davis. Next comes a dramatic version of Un autre est son époux from Werther, the joyful Aubade from Lalo's Le Roi d'Ys, and the Raoul/Marguerite duet from Les Huguenots (with Mady Mesplé) with Arnold's Asil hérèditaire from Rossini's Guillaume Tell, with its fabulously ringing top notes, leading us into the Italian bel canto items.

    Mirella Freni joins him for duets from La Sonnambula, Lucia di Lammermoor and Don Pasquale whilst alone he sings Edgardo's Tombe degli avi miei and Ernesto's Cercherò lontana terra. The Bellini had me wishing he had been engaged for Callas's studio recording of La Sonnambula rather than the ineffectual Monti. After all he had already sung Narciso in her recording of Il Turco in Italia.

    Freni, who had yet to venture into more dramatic repertoire, blends well with Gedda in the duets, but back in 1966 she had yet to learn how to project personality in a recording. Her singing is lovely but a little anonymous. Both the solo items could be considered models of bel canto style but are also sung with appreciation of the dramatic situation, the recitatives vividly delivered.

    To finish we have a clutch of encores, including Lara's Granada and the lovely Berceuse from Godard's Jocelyn, which give us a glimpse of Gedda's prowess in lighter fare and remind us of that Gedda also recorded a lot of operetta.

    Given Gedda was such a prolific recording artist, there was a lot to choose from when compiling a set of Great Moments, and no doubt the set could have extended to many more discs. There is no doubt, though, that EMI have chosen some plums from his discography and there isn't a dud performance on the whole set. Extravagantly recommended.
    With Gedda there is something for everybody. It might be easier to list what he didn't record. He thought that it was important to do recordings so that people would be able to listen in the future and record things that he would never performe live. He had such a great attitude. A role might not be right for him vocally for live performances, but it won't hurt his voice if he does it once in the studio. What is so amazing about him is that his great in pretty much everything that he recorded. EMI's ICON collection has so much material that it makes your head spin. Well if almost 14 hours of great singing is not enough for you...
    "First I sing loud. When I start to run out of breath I sing softer" Giuseppe Di Stefano on his Faust high c diminuendo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diminuendo View Post
    With Gedda there is something for everybody. It might be easier to list what he didn't record. He thought that it was important to do recordings so that people would be able to listen in the future and record things that he would never performe live. He had such a great attitude. A role might not be right for him vocally for live performances, but it won't hurt his voice if he does it once in the studio. What is so amazing about him is that his great in pretty much everything that he recorded. EMI's ICON collection has so much material that it makes your head spin. Well if almost 14 hours of great singing is not enough for you...
    What attracted me to this box was that included the whole of his first recital discs, which is, in my opinion, one of the best tenor recital discs ever recorded.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post
    What attracted me to this box was that included the whole of his first recital discs, which is, in my opinion, one of the best tenor recital discs ever recorded.
    I was lucky enough to be in Europe somewhere around the time this wonderful recital album debuted, and I bought the three-CD set at either an EMI store or maybe HMV (or some other TLA). Essen, Germany, if memory serves. Anyway, I have loved Gedda's amazing voice, stunning messa di voce, and great high notes for more than 50 years now. I can't tell you how many times I have cracked [fortunately, in the shower, not in public] trying to reproduce "Mes amis, écoutez l'histoire" from Postillon du Longjumeau in both tenor and baritone keys, and I still grieve his passing.

    I would not disagree with Tsaraslondon on any point but would just mention that the Pêcheurs de Perles selection is not--I had to pull out my copy to confirm--the famous "Au fond du temple saint" duet with baritone, but rather the (to my mind, even more ravishing) aria, "Je crois entendre encore." Although many tenors take this down a step into G minor (B-flat on top), Gedda, as expected, sings it in the original A minor key, thus requiring pianissimo high B's and the climactic high C at the end.

    I was fortunate to sing in the chorus when Alfredo Kraus sang Zurga in Dallas a long time ago, opposite the wonderful lyric soprano Ruth Ann Welting, who died way too young and was a phenom in her time, and Richard Stillwell as a swashbuckling Nadir. Although Kraus was equally a master of soft high notes and voix mixte and all those wonderful French-tenor techniques, his breathtaking performance only served to highlight how much more beautiful Gedda's natural voice was, with a technique equal and possibly superior to that of Kraus.

    Thank you Tsaraslondon for a comprehensive review of one of my favorite singers in recital. I would also add that those who wish more exposure to Gedda should certainly try to find him singing Russian folk songs, which he sings beautifully and with native ease.

    Kind regards,

    George

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barelytenor View Post
    but would just mention that the Pêcheurs de Perles selection is not--I had to pull out my copy to confirm--the famous "Au fond du temple saint" duet with baritone, but rather the (to my mind, even more ravishing) aria, "Je crois entendre encore."
    Kind regards,

    George
    Indeed, George. Where was my head? Sometimes my fingers lag behind my head and typing the title of the famous duet was probably automatic whilst I thought of something else.
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Jul-13-2019 at 23:48.
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    Thanks guys. On the strength of the positive comments above I've just ordered the Icon box of Nicolai Gedda. Very much looking forward to hearing it. I've always been impressed by his ease of delivery and he really does the Russian repertoire exceptionally well. The Scandinavian countries have produced some phenomenal singers, haven't they?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barbebleu View Post
    Thanks guys. On the strength of the positive comments above I've just ordered the Icon box of Nicolai Gedda. Very much looking forward to hearing it. I've always been impressed by his ease of delivery and he really does the Russian repertoire exceptionally well. The Scandinavian countries have produced some phenomenal singers, haven't they?
    The Icon box has a lot more music on it, but it doesn't seem to have much from that 1953 recital disc on it, which is complete on Disc 1 of the Great Moments box, and was my main reason for acquiring the set. I hate to tell you this, but you do really need to hear it.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Senior Member Barelytenor's Avatar
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    And now I correct myself. Ruth Welting. Not Ruth Ann, that's Swenson.

    Ruth Welting sang both Baby Doe in 1980 and Leila in 1979 in Dallas, but she was also a wonderful Lucia (performing the Mad Scene in the original F major key), Zerbinetta, Olympia, Philine, many others.

    Kind regards,

    George

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