Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 50

Thread: Beethoven piano sonata sets...How many do you own?

  1. #31
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    2,104
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    So who recorded the best Hammerklavier, in everyone's humble opinion? Doesn't have to be part of a complete cycle. I am trying to better understand this huge work.

    I have heard Yudina, Schnabel, and Kempff. Of the three I like the Kempff.

  2. #32
    Senior Member CnC Bartok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Oxford-ish
    Posts
    1,019
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Possibly Gilels, but there's a magical Hammerklavier by Solomon on EMI that's got a lot that marks it out from the crowd....

  3. Likes Josquin13 liked this post
  4. #33
    Senior Member staxomega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    US
    Posts
    102
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog View Post
    I have many dozens of Beethoven piano sonata recordings but only one full set - Russell Sherman on GM Recordings. It's likely deleted by now.
    What an interesting cycle to have for a sole complete set Sherman's cycle has been one of my favorite discoveries from late last year/this year, I raved a bit about it in the GMG Beethoven thread. You are correct that it has now been deleted, I tried buying it from GM Recordings and they have no plans to put it back in print due to lack of demand. I had to piece it together from individual volumes. One of these I will even get around to deciphering all of Sherman's liner notes

    I wrote a ranking of all my favorite complete or near complete cycles for a science based hifi forum, I'll see about tightening up the descriptions and modifying it to be more suitable for classical music lovers then start a thread about it. The Beethoven piano sonatas have been my favorite discoveries in hearing various interpretations.

  5. #34
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    2,104
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I love listening to András Schiff talk about the Beethoven sonatas but I wasn’t too impressed with his recordings of them. Maybe I owe him another shot, hmm... I love his Bach and Schubert.

  6. Likes Josquin13 liked this post
  7. #35
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,775
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    I love listening to András Schiff talk about the Beethoven sonatas but I wasn’t too impressed with his recordings of them. Maybe I owe him another shot, hmm... I love his Bach and Schubert.
    I've listened to that set of lectures twice over the years. Oddly, I don't have his recordings.

    The second time, I was doing a sonata by sonata, movement by movement comparison of the 5 sets I do have:

    Brendel (2nd)
    Annie Fischer
    Kempff (stereo)
    Goode
    Arrau

  8. Likes premont liked this post
  9. #36
    Senior Member DarkAngel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    La Scala
    Posts
    3,659
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    I love the Brautigam series which are available in Hybrid SACD format, performed on three different keyboards (modern replicas) that evolved during Beethoven's own time, I really don't feel they take backseat to modern piano and have their own innate strengths. Now we have the money saving 9 disc boxset from BIS which is always welcome......but there is a huge catch

    It does not include the absolutely wonderful additional solo keyboard works contained on discs 10-15, these are just as good as the sonatas and even more desireable with many of these works being rarely recorded, these are the best part of the entire series......

    A terrible mistake by BIS to omit these from boxset.......


    Last edited by DarkAngel; Jul-11-2019 at 19:46.

  10. #37
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Posts
    9,898
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Lortie is my only complete set. There are a few tempos I don't care for, but for the most part it's a fine set in great sound.

    I have some singles CDs by Gilels, and O'Conor which I'm happy with. I don't care for Schiff's playing. It's a bit too precious and conservative. Flawless technically, but not very exciting.
    Short-term thinkers are rewarded with reelection, while those who dare to take seriously our responsibility to future generations commonly find themselves out of office.

    - Marcia Bjornerud, Geologist

  11. Likes premont liked this post
  12. #38
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    19,043
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkAngel View Post
    I love the Brautigam series which are available in Hybrid SACD format, performed on three different keyboards (modern replicas) that evolved during Beethoven's own time, I really don't feel they take backseat to modern piano and have their own innate strengths...
    Fortepiano renditions of the sonatas are kind of rare. Another nice one, but the late sonatas only, is by Peter Serkin on a Graf fortepiano with a very nice sound. Cheap as CDs and also available on YouTube.



  13. Likes wkasimer, gardibolt liked this post
  14. #39
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sharon, Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,803
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    I love listening to András Schiff talk about the Beethoven sonatas but I wasn’t too impressed with his recordings of them. Maybe I owe him another shot, hmm... I love his Bach and Schubert.
    Like you, I got a lot more from his lectures than I did from the recordings.

  15. Likes premont, Josquin13 liked this post
  16. #40
    Senior Member howlingfantods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    1,009
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I have a half dozen or so (Schnabel, stereo Kempff, Arrau, stereo Backhaus, Annie Fischer, Pollini) but I hardly ever listen to them to be honest. My favorite Beethoven pianists (Richter, Sokolov, Solomon, Gilels) didn't do full cycles--Sokolov is still present tense but it's very extremely unlikely that he'll ever do a full cycle.

    @flamenco -- my list of favorite Hammerklaviers is the same as my list of favorite Beethoven pianists--I care more about the late sonatas than the rest of the 32, then I care about the named middle period sonatas, and care least about the early period ones.

    For one single recommendation, I'd probably pick the Richter performance from 1975 on BBC Legends. There's another 1975 performance from Prague that's also great on the "Richter in Prague" box set but he has a pretty major finger slip one point in the first movement. (Richter by the way was pretty unstable emotionally around this time--this was around the same time period he couldn't be at ease mentally unless he had his plastic lobster with him).

    Solomon and Sokolov have incredible Hammerklaviers, but they have unusually slow slow movements that might be a bit of an acquired taste. But honestly super highly recommended--I probably personally rank them Sokolov then Richter then Solomon then Gilels, but it's all a hair's breadth of difference.
    Last edited by howlingfantods; Jul-12-2019 at 19:23.

  17. Likes flamencosketches, elgars ghost liked this post
  18. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Posts
    12,599
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CnC Bartok View Post
    There's a magical Hammerklavier by Solomon on EMI that's got a lot that marks it out from the crowd....
    I agree. Personally, I want to hear the third movement as a spiritual experience, so Solomon has so far been the most spiritual one I've encountered. When I first heard it, I got so caught up that I had to tell myself to breathe.
    Last edited by Manxfeeder; Jul-12-2019 at 20:23.

  19. Likes premont, CnC Bartok, Josquin13 liked this post
  20. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1,432
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Manxfeeder View Post
    I agree. Personally, I want to hear the third movement as a spiritual experience, so Solomon has so far been the most spiritual one I've encountered. When I first heard it, I got so caught up that I had to tell myself to breathe.
    I agree too. Another one which stands out in this movement is IMO R. Serkin.

  21. Likes Manxfeeder liked this post
  22. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Posts
    12,599
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by premont View Post
    I agree too. Another one which stands out in this movement is IMO R. Serkin.
    Agreed. I was about to mention that one also.

  23. #44
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    2,104
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by howlingfantods View Post
    I have a half dozen or so (Schnabel, stereo Kempff, Arrau, stereo Backhaus, Annie Fischer, Pollini) but I hardly ever listen to them to be honest. My favorite Beethoven pianists (Richter, Sokolov, Solomon, Gilels) didn't do full cycles--Sokolov is still present tense but it's very extremely unlikely that he'll ever do a full cycle.

    @flamenco -- my list of favorite Hammerklaviers is the same as my list of favorite Beethoven pianists--I care more about the late sonatas than the rest of the 32, then I care about the named middle period sonatas, and care least about the early period ones.

    For one single recommendation, I'd probably pick the Richter performance from 1975 on BBC Legends. There's another 1975 performance from Prague that's also great on the "Richter in Prague" box set but he has a pretty major finger slip one point in the first movement. (Richter by the way was pretty unstable emotionally around this time--this was around the same time period he couldn't be at ease mentally unless he had his plastic lobster with him).

    Solomon and Sokolov have incredible Hammerklaviers, but they have unusually slow slow movements that might be a bit of an acquired taste. But honestly super highly recommended--I probably personally rank them Sokolov then Richter then Solomon then Gilels, but it's all a hair's breadth of difference.
    Is there an extant photo anywhere of Richter with his plastic lobster? I have Richter at Spoleto, which was recorded in 1967 (little bit before the "volatile" period you mention) and it's an excellent live disc, but there are at least a couple of MAJOR slip ups in the Chopin G minor Ballade. It's really too bad. It's not a great recording of that piece at all.

    Anyway, I'll have to check out one of the Russians in this work. Haven't heard any. Anyway, Schnabel has been keeping me fascinated lately, and I also just picked up Peter Serkin's recording of the Hammerklavier on a Graf fortepiano. Recently I also got Pollini's late Beethoven sonatas set, but haven't heard any of it yet.

    I have heard none of the elder Serkin's Beethoven sonatas. That is another one I would like to check out.

    I do not like any of what I've heard of Solomon, in Beethoven or anything else. Just haven't been impressed. I'll come back to him at a later date when I'm feeling open to giving the guy another shot.

    Any love for Robert Taub? His Beethoven sonatas cycle is available in MP3 form for extremely cheap. The guy wrote a book on the Beethoven sonatas.
    Last edited by flamencosketches; Jul-13-2019 at 03:12.

  24. #45
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    2,104
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    That fortepiano sounds damn good, doesn't it? The only better one I've heard is the one that András Schiff plays on his recent Schubert recordings. But I'm not a major lover of the instrument.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •