Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 32 of 32

Thread: What makes Haydn and Mozart sound different?

  1. #31
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    454
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Listen to the chromatic motivic build at 8:13.

    Beethoven studied this and wrote a fugue after it. Interestingly, late Haydn's 'parallel' to this piece, Variations in F minor Hob.XVII/6 also inspired Beethoven in other aspects (in works such as Sonata Op.2 No.1)

    Quote Originally Posted by tdc View Post
    This is why Haydn's music sounds as though he uses less dissonant and rich harmonic material compared to Mozart. In the vertical sense his music is less harmonically spicy, and in this sense I think Mozart used more dissonance than Haydn or even Beethoven for that matter. I think it is also fair to say that Mozart did not have any weakness in terms of using modulation either, so he did have the structural depth, and more harmonic spice.
    Regarding dissonance, I think Beethoven (and Haydn) preferred using dissonances involving diatonic intervals more, rather than the kind of chromaticism Mozart favored. I think there's no such thing as 'correct way' to write dissonance and I think that more dissonance doesn't necessarily make music greater. The only 'correct way' is to write it in such a way that it inspires other and later artists (criteria which all greats in classical music fulfilled to certain degree). For instance, Brahms in his late years admired Bach and Mozart's use of dissonance more than Beethoven's.
    https://books.google.ca/books?id=7iwZ-qTuSkUC&pg=PA135
    While I would not say Beethoven's (and Haydn's) use of dissonance were objectively worse or less impressive than the other masters, I think this quote by Brahms can be used to argue that Bach and Mozart's use of dissonance wasn't any less inspirational, influential than Beethoven's in music history.

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=2MPXSVcdzPUC&pg=PA99
    "Stylistically Spohr's and Beethoven's development as composers took them in diametrically opposite directions. The op. 18 quartets are the point at which they were closest, but from there their paths diverged. Beethoven moved away from the chromaticism of late Mozart towards a broader harmonic style; it is significant that his only preserved comment about Spohr's music should have been 'He is too rich in dissonances; pleasure in his music marred by his chromatic melody.'"
    Last edited by hammeredklavier; Apr-23-2019 at 20:58.

  2. Likes Potiphera liked this post
  3. #32
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    7,258
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hammeredklavier View Post
    Regarding dissonance, I think Beethoven (and Haydn) preferred using dissonances involving diatonic intervals more, rather than the kind of chromaticism Mozart favored. I think there's no such thing as 'correct way' to write dissonance and I think that more dissonance doesn't necessarily make music greater.
    I've never argued that more dissonance makes a work greater. It is more about striking a balance and putting everything in its proper place. Some of Mozart's music is not very dissonant at all, but he still is able to win over my ear with his melodic charm and playful inventiveness, and when he is looking to express something more melancholy he is able to do it with taste and a sophisticated use of dissonance. I think Beethoven and Haydn sought to use harmony more in the horizontal sense, rather than the vertical for expressivity. Beethoven also in the use of his dynamic contrasts. To my tastes this is a less effective approach, because it relies too much on time and linearity to make a point.

  4. Likes hammeredklavier, Rex1 liked this post
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •