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Thread: Most Honorable, Morally Upright Operatic Character

  1. #46
    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CnC Bartok View Post
    In answer to the original question, both God and Jesus appear in Jerry Springer: The Opera, surely the most profound utterance of the last hundred years.

    Are you all doubting THEIR moral credentials???
    I would have to see the synopsis. Is the opera reverent? or irreverent?
    "All of Italian opera can be heard in [Bellini's] "Ah! non creda [mirarti]."
    --Renata Scotto in "Scotto, More Than a DIva."

  2. #47
    Senior Member CnC Bartok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fritz Kobus View Post
    I would have to see the synopsis. Is the opera reverent? or irreverent?
    I suspect "irrelevant" would be far more appropriate than either, Fritz. Extremely daft silly and pointless too.

  3. #48
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    Surprised that two of the top morally upright characters were never mentioned: Desdemona and Liu.
    Last edited by nina foresti; Apr-21-2019 at 19:28.

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  5. #49
    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CnC Bartok View Post
    I suspect "irrelevant" would be far more appropriate than either, Fritz. Extremely daft silly and pointless too.
    Well, looking at description from the Wikipedia page on it, it is beyond irreverent; it is blasphemous!
    Last edited by Fritz Kobus; Apr-21-2019 at 20:54.
    "All of Italian opera can be heard in [Bellini's] "Ah! non creda [mirarti]."
    --Renata Scotto in "Scotto, More Than a DIva."

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    Senior Member Sloe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregMitchell View Post
    Violetta - she scarifices her own happiness for someone she's never met.
    I agree.
    Case closed.

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  9. #51
    Senior Member DarkAngel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nina foresti View Post
    Surprised that two of the top morally upright characters were never mentioned: Desdemona and Liu.
    Except in post #11......

    It took Parsifal years of pilgrimage and enlightenment to discover what Liu knew instinctively: the greatest of all human virtues lies outside of self concern, it is empathy towards others
    Last edited by DarkAngel; Apr-21-2019 at 22:17.

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  11. #52
    Senior Member Sieglinde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkAngel View Post
    Except in post #11......

    It took Parsifal years of pilgrimage and enlightenment to discover what Liu knew instinctively: the greatest of all human emotions lies outside of self concern, it is empathy towards others
    Parsifal is dumbass tenor who has negative points in Int/Wis XD

  12. #53
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    Oops! I missed it. So where is Desdemona?
    And what of Cio Cio San who gave up her child for the betterment of his future?

  13. #54
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    Yes, as I hear examples like Desdemona and Cio Cio San I have to say again that I think this question needs to be rephrased. There can be no single answer, since the heroic self-sacrificing perfect soprano is a standard opera trope. They are all perfect and therefore all equally honorable and morally upright.

  14. #55
    Senior Member Orfeo's Avatar
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    Ariane (from Dukas' Ariane et Barbe-Bleue)
    -> She unselfishly tried to restore the
    wives of Barbe-Bleue their self-esteem and their sense of liberation, only to be disappointed once the wives decided to stay in the castle and tended Bluebeard, who arrived at the castle wounded by the peasants' rage.

    Tamara (from Anton Rubinstein's The Demon)
    -> Good, virtuous, but torn between her attraction towards the Demon and her sense of honor.

    Kochubey (from Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa)
    -> Kochubey (the wealthy Cossack whose daughter elopes with Mazeppa) who actually managed to successfully keep Mariya from him. He turned Mazeppa in to the Tsar four years after Mazeppa asked for her hand.

    David (from Nielsen's Saul and David)
    -> a worthy candidate here.

    Guercoeur (from Magnard's opera of the same name)
    -> Guercoeur is a noble hero, a visionary ruler, who had freed his people from tyranny. But he died and is transcended to Heaven discontented with what's happening on his obscured city-state.
    David A. Hollingsworth (dholling)

    ~All good art is about something deeper than it admits.
    Roger Ebert

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