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Thread: C.M you need analogue to really experience the greatness of music,vocal music perhaps

  1. #16
    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    You can check for yourself what sounds good.

    For example get a digital recorder, and play back files at different sample rates: 44.1. 48, 192,,,even try lower sample rates like 22, 16, and 8 (like rap guys use to give an "aged"lo-rez sound to drumbeats). In this way, you will KNOW what digital resolution is, and what it sounds like.

    But Bigshot is stuck in the consumer world. He probably doesn't have to deal with resolution, sample rates, and multi-channel mixes, or know what it sounds like. People who do mixes, like engineers and producers, have developed their "ear/brain" to the point that they hear things others do not. This is where you can really hear things, not some unnamed Pentatone SACD.

    Bigshot, in this regard, is an amateur consumer listener.

  2. #17
    Senior Member bigshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    You can check for yourself what sounds good.
    The best way to do that is with a line level matched, direct A/B switched, blind listening test.

    Line Level Matched because human perception tends to favor sounds that are slightly louder. You can take two identical sound files and directly compare them, and if one of them is as little as .5 to 1dB louder than the other, you will choose the louder one as sounding better, even if there is absolutely no difference between the two.

    Direct A/B switched because human auditory memory is very short. Two slightly different sounds can't be discerned consistently if there is more than a second between samples. The best way to discern small differences in quality (or even bigger ones) is to put the two samples you're comparing side by side with a switch, so you can quickly go back and forth to directly compare them.

    Blind because human bias can unconsciously skew the results of your comparison. Bias is real and every human being is subject to its effects. We all use bias every day in our decision making processes. Audiophiles are especially subject to expectation bias and confirmation bias. They invest their ego in the ability to hear differences, and they convince themselves they can hear differences that don't exist. Without realizing it, they unconsciously perceive differently because of bias. You have to eliminate the possibility of bias to do a fair comparison. You do that by hiding the equipment you are comparing from yourself. It's even better to do a double blind test, so the reactions of the person administering the test don't influence the test subject.

    Doing controlled listening tests is easy and the equipment to do it is very inexpensive. All you need is a switch box, a way to measure and adjust line level, and a friend to help administer the test. I do this with every piece of sound equipment I buy. I expect every piece of home audio electronics to be audibly transparent. That means that every DAC or player or amp I buy has to produce sound with quality that exceeds my ability to hear differences. When I buy a new piece of equipment I rack it up alongside my reference system and do a direct comparison.

    It's important to me that every piece of equipment is audibly transparent. I have done a lot of work calibrating my system. I don't want one piece of equipment to be colored differently than another. If that was the case, I would require a different calibration for each item, or combination of items. It would be chaos. So every time I buy a component, I check it to make sure it is clean and balanced sounding. If it isn't, I would box it up and send it back for a refund. I haven't had to do that yet, because even inexpensive equipment today is manufactured to meet spec... and the spec for redbook CDs is beyond the threshold of transparency. If it plays a CD or digital file, it plays it to spec unless it is defective by design or manufacture, and that is a rare thing.

    Do controlled tests and you'll know what you are talking about. Whenever I hear someone parroting audiophoolery, I know for sure that they don't do controlled tests. If they are really deluded, they will claim that they don't believe in controlled tests or scientific methods of measuring. All I can say to that is, I hope their doctor doesn't feel the same way! They won't live long!

    By the way, I am actually a professional working in the media business. I've worked as a producer and sound engineer. I've done audio editing and restoration, and I've supervised recording sessions and sound mixes. But all that is irrelevant to this discussion. You don't have to be a professional to know what you're talking about. You just have to have done your homework. If there was a subject that you were interested in finding out more about, I would be happy to help you find the answers, but you don't seem to be interested in that sort of thing.
    Last edited by bigshot; Apr-30-2019 at 17:37.
    CD Sound Is All You Need: http://xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html
    AES Audio Myths Seminar: http://youtu.be/BYTlN6wjcvQ
    AES Damn Lies Seminar: http://youtu.be/Zvireu2SGZM

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