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Thread: Saddest movie moments

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    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
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    Default Saddest movie moments

    Let's hear some moments in movies that made you tear up or start balling. No need to be shy. I'm sure there are certain perspectives that something could be sad.

    The first time I cried in a movie was Silent Running when the guy sent the dome containing the last forest life preserved from Earth into space and blew the ship including himself up to avoid his superiors, who wanted to destroy the forest, from arresting him.

    Another sad moment was in Ugetsu, when the spirit of the dead wife came back to take care of her husband and son, when the husband didn't know she died.

    What's yours? I just want to hear some perspectives of certain moments I may haven't considered before.
    Last edited by Phil loves classical; Apr-25-2019 at 01:04.
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    Senior Member Red Terror's Avatar
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    Encino man. I miss California.

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    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    "Schindler's List" the movie all and the music i get all choked up

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    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
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    First thing that comes to mind is the ending of Fellini's La Strada.

    Slightly off topic - the Debussy bio I recently read by Harvey Snyder had me almost in tears at the end, just the way the death was described, how France was during the war at the time, his relationship with his daughter...I'm almost choking up thinking about it.

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    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
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    Thanks. Schindler's List and La Strada I'm familiar with. I'll check out the others.
    Last edited by Phil loves classical; Apr-25-2019 at 02:38.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

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    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    and this one also

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    One very poignant scene is towards the end of the musical Fiddler on the Roof. Tevye couldn't reconcile one of his daughters, Chava, wanting to marry a gentile, so he disowns her. She begs for forgiveness but it is only later when the Jewish populations of the local villages are waiting at a remote Ukrainian train station to start new lives he blesses her, but not to her face.

    It's poignant for two reasons - it is unlikely that Tevye will ever see his daughter again as he plans to emigrate to the USA and she to Poland, and the fact that she is resettling in Kraków makes you apprehensive of what may have happened to her decades later.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    The old lad(Rose) throwing the heart of the ocean into the sea (Titanic)


    Short but very moving in context ,

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    Senior Member MacLeod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil loves classical View Post
    The first time I cried in a movie was Silent Running when the guy sent the dome containing the last forest life preserved from Earth into space and blew the ship including himself up to avoid his superiors, who wanted to destroy the forest, from arresting him.
    My sister completely drenched my shirt with her blubbing at Silent Running!

    I started out young. I'm a sucker for dog movies, and cried at both Old Yeller and Dog of Flanders when just a nipper. I now find it difficult to watch It's A Wonderful Life - too many places to list that bring a lump to my throat - and I think I've probably waxed lyrical several times already about The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp when our British hero is snubbed by his German rival.
    Last edited by MacLeod; Apr-25-2019 at 08:05.
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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Omar Sharif running after the streetcar carrying Julie Christie, then staggering and clutching at his chest, in Doctor Zhivago. Also La Strada and Silent Running.
    Last edited by Strange Magic; Apr-25-2019 at 12:17.

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    Senior Member Kontrapunctus's Avatar
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    The ending of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, A Man Called Ove, and Testament (1983).
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    There is a difference between movies that are very sad (or make me think the world is sad) and movies that make me cry, not to mention that there are many comedies that include extremely sad moments. One of the saddest movies I have ever watched are Breaking the Waves and Melancholia, both by Lars von Trier, yet I never shed a tear when watching them. On the other hand, there are also movies that make me cry every time I watch them. Here are some examples:

    Ikiru by Akira Kurosawa
    La vita è bella by Roberto Begnini
    Ballada o soldate (Ballad of a Soldier) by Grigori Chukhrai
    City Lights by Charlie Chaplin
    Last edited by Mifek; Apr-26-2019 at 01:17.

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    Senior Member DeepR's Avatar
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    Hachi: A Dog's Tale
    It's just a little TV film, nothing special you'd think, yet it almost seems to be made specifically to make you cry. And it works.... I mean come on, you'd have to be a robot to keep it dry....
    Last edited by DeepR; Apr-26-2019 at 11:56.

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    Senior Member Templeton's Avatar
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    The finale of the 1989 film 'Longtime Companion', at the height of the AIDS epidemic. The ending, when the remaining friends imagine being reunited with their lost companions always chokes me up.

    'Schindler's List' was already mentioned and I would second this.

    'Philadelphia', when the friends and family gather around the TV, watching childhood videos of the Tom Hanks character.

    The ending of 'Philomena', when she learns that the nuns had lied to her and her now deceased son, preventing them from being reunited.

    The finale to 'Midnight Cowboy', when Jon Voight discovers that the Dustin Hoffman character has passed, just prior to their arrival in Miami.

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    I always cry at the end of any film version of A Tale of Two Cities, as Carton mounts the guillotine steps thinking to himself, “It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”

    But in the 1980 film, when I was showing it to a class of girls who were studying the book for 'O'-level, we all teared up as well at the moment when the unconscious Darnay is loaded into the escaping carriage and Lucy opens Carton's letter and learns that he has sacrificed his own life and saved her husband's because of his deep love for her.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Apr-26-2019 at 12:46.
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