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Thread: Big Box Sets

  1. #31
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    For performers I really like a box is often too much of clash with what I already have. I did buy Zinman's big box a few years ago as I quite liked his work but had none of it in my collection. I didn't regret it as there was a lot to enjoy (everything but his Strauss). And I bought the Solti Wagner box as I wanted Solti's Ring and didn't have him in any other Wagner, either. Again, no regrets. Other than these I have mainly gone for smaller budget boxes.

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  3. #32
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    For performers I really like a box is often too much of clash with what I already have. I did buy Zinman's big box a few years ago as I quite liked his work but had none of it in my collection. I didn't regret it as there was a lot to enjoy (everything but his Strauss). And I bought the Solti Wagner box as I wanted Solti's Ring and didn't have him in any other Wagner, either. Again, no regrets. Other than these I have mainly gone for smaller budget boxes.
    Small budget box sets (3-12ish CDs) form the bulk of my collection. They are an awesome way to explore a composer, a performer, a conductor etc as a whole rather than bit by bit.

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  5. #33
    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Box sets in the pipeline...

    Due 31-5-2019 -

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    Rafael Kubelík: The Munich Symphonic Recordings - 15 CDs

    Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelík

    "From 1961–79, Kubelík was principal conductor of the Symphony Orchestra of Bavarian Radio in Munich. He had found there his new musical home. He led the BR Symphony Orchestra to new heights, developing a unique sound and performance culture in a perfect diversity of repertoire from Baroque music up to free tonal Expressionism and to Karl Amadeus Hartmann and Benjamin Britten. As a musician, his prime directive was lyrical phrasing as well as clear and conscious articulation of the harmonic tensions and the vitality of the rhythmical and metric flow. He always had all these elements in mind, seeking to balance them. And Kubelík loved the gorgeous, lush sound, but never at the price of diaphanousness. This CD Edition gives us a detailed overview about his legendary interpretations and is also a time document of his long time working period in the city of Munich."


    Due 31-5-2019

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    Philippe Entremont - The Complete Sony Recordings - 34 CDs

    "In celebration of renowned French pianist Phillippe Entremont’s 85th birthday, Sony Classical is pleased to release Philippe Entremont’s complete Columbia recordings for solo piano. This must have boxset is the first ever release of Philippe Entremont’s complete Columbia recordings for solo piano in a single 34 CD edition and will also feature recordings which have not previously been released on CD. Included in this boxset are stunning recordings of compositions by well-known composers including Chopin, Brahms, Beethoven, Liszt, Debussy and more.
    Entremont began playing the piano when he was six years old. By the age of 16, Entremont had won numerous prizes for sight-reading and piano playing including the prestigious Long-Thibaud Competition. In 1952, Entremont won the Queen Elisabeth Music Competition and began his career as a concert pianist shortly afterwards.
    Entremont—who trained at the famed Paris Conservatoire and studied under legendary pianist Marguerite Long—has performed with internationally acclaimed orchestra’s including the Munich Symphony Orchestra and the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra.
    As well as performing alongside world class orchestra’s, Entremont has performed with many phenomenal musicians and conductors including cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Gaby Casadesus and Leonard Bernstein.
    In 1958, at the age of 23, Entremont made his name in the musical world with the release of his debut concerto recording for Columbia Masterworks. His recording of Grieg A minor and Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini—with Eugene Ormandy conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra was the first of many best-selling albums that Philippe Entremont would record for Columbia over the next two decades. This remarkable boxset features many of those best-selling albums."


    Due 14-6-2019 -

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    The Early Music Collection - 30 CDs

    "The Early Music Collection is a wide-ranging survey that traces the history of Western music from plainchant, the music of the Catholic Church, through polyphony, to the end of the 17th century. It includes leading ensembles and instrumentalists. Many of the individual albums have been critically lauded. Recent years have brought a vast expansion in our understanding and knowledge of early music periods. There has been investigation into the repertoire and techniques of other ages, coupled with a movement that has favored the use of instruments and ways of playing them that are more or less authentic. Even where surviving historical instruments or modern reproductions of them are not used, the styles of performance have been influenced. Above all the myth of unending progress has been abandoned in favor of an evaluation of each period and type of music on its own terms. Early Music, in fact, has become a flourishing industry, stimulated by the remarkable growth in production and distribution of early music. For our present purposes we limit the term Early Music to cover a period ranging from plainchant to the end of the 17th century. The period that followed, the age of Bach and Handel and the great synthesis of the Late Baroque, is generally more familiar to listeners and is, in any case, another story."


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  7. #34
    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Editor's Note - I do not have this and have no intentions of ever acquiring it - this is for informational purposes only -

    Herbert von Karajan: Complete Recordings on Deutsche Grammophon and Decca - 330 CDs, 24 DVDs, 2 Blu-ray audio discs...

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  9. #35
    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Editor's Note - I do not have this and have no intentions of ever acquiring it - this is for informational purposes only -

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    Leonard Bernstein: The Complete Recordings On Deutsche Grammophon & Decca
    100th Anniversary Limited Numbered Edition
    121 CDs + 36 DVDs + 1 Blu-ray Audio



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  11. #36
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    For performers I really like a box is often too much of clash with what I already have. I did buy Zinman's big box a few years ago as I quite liked his work but had none of it in my collection. I didn't regret it as there was a lot to enjoy (everything but his Strauss).
    A very mixed bag. His Beethoven is good (especially in the concerti, which are included in the box), as is his Schumann. The Mahler is decent although not particularly memorable; I thought that his Brahms and Schubert were worse than that. I haven't dipped into his Strauss yet (I have Kempe, so I don't see much need). It's a set that I bought when I saw it cheap ($40 used), to keep in the office for those times when I get the urge to play a particular work.

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  13. #37
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    In cases where they actively block purchases...I use Buyee (buyee.jp)

  14. #38
    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Recent releases...

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    Robert Casadesus - The Complete Columbia Album Collection - 65 CDs

    "Sony Classical is pleased to release the first ever collection of the great French pianist-composer Robert Casadesus’ recordings for Columbia Masterworks. This must have box set features x62 recordings that have been new-ly transferred, mixed and mastered from the original analogue discs and tapes using 24 bit/ 192 kHz technology. Included in the collection are stunning collaborations with some of the world’s best musicians, and composers. This includes: x16 time Grammy winner, Leonard Bernstein; internationally renowned French virtuoso violinist, Zino Francescatti and British cellist and conductor Sir John Barbirolli. Featured on the box set are x61 CDs of Casadesus’ recordings and 4 xCDs with recordings from the exceptional pianist and wife to Robert, Gaby Casadesus and their son Jean Casadesus."


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    Christian Thielemann - Complete Orchestral Recordings on Deutsche Grammophon - 21 CDs

    "Deutsche Grammophon celebrates the 60th birthday (1 April 2019) of Christian Thielemann with a 21-CD box set which brings together his complete orchestral and choral recordings on the Yellow Label. The focus of Thielemann's work as a conductor remains the Romantic symphonic repertory associated with composers such as Brahms and Bruckner, together with the music dramas of Wagner and Richard Strauss, but he has also repeatedly demonstrated his familiarity with light music of the highest quality. Featuring works by Beethoven, Brahms, Bruckner, Mozart, Schumann, Orff, R. Strauss and Wagner as well as contributions from Lisa Batiashvili, Maurizio Pollini, Münchner Philharmoniker, Philharmonia Orchestra, Staatskapelle Dresden and Wiener Philharmoniker."

    Last edited by Mollie John; May-31-2019 at 13:17.

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  16. #39
    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Rafael Kubelík: Complete Recordings on Deutsche Grammophon

    64 CD + 2 DVD Limited Edition

    The entirety of Rafael Kubelík's recordings for the Yellow Label, united for the first time in one edition.

    Featuring his justly famed Beethoven cycle with nine different orchestras.

    Pioneering cycles of Dvořák’s and Mahler’s symphonies.

    Standard-setting recordings of works by Janáček, Orff and Smetana.

    Original cover art on sleeves.

    120-page booklet with new liner notes by Rob Cowan.

    Works

    Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123, Sz.116
    Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72b
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 36
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 55 'Eroica'
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 in B flat major, Op. 60
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68 'Pastoral'
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 8 in F major, Op. 93
    Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 'Choral'
    Berg: Violin Concerto 'To the Memory of an Angel' (1935)
    Bruckner: Symphony No. 4 in Eb Major 'Romantic'
    Dvorak: Carnival Overture, Op. 92
    Dvorak: Hussite Overture, Op. 67
    Dvorak: In Nature's Realm Overture, Op. 91
    Dvorak: Legends, Op. 59
    Dvorak: My Home Overture, Op. 62
    Dvorak: Othello Overture, Op. 93
    Dvorak: Scherzo capriccioso, Op. 66
    Dvorak: Serenade for Strings in E major, Op. 22
    Dvorak: Slavonic Dances Nos. 1-8, Op. 46 Nos. 1-8
    Dvorak: Slavonic Dances Nos. 9-16, Op. 72 Nos. 1-8
    Dvorak: Stabat Mater, Op. 58
    Dvorak: Symphonic Variations, Op. 78
    Dvorak: Symphonies Nos. 1-9
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 1 in C minor, B9 'The Bells of Zlonice'
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 4
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 10
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 4 in D minor, Op. 13
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 5 in F major, Op. 76
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 6 in D major, Op. 60
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88
    Dvorak: Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 'From the New World'
    Dvorak: The Golden Spinning Wheel, Op. 109
    Dvorak: The Noon Witch, Op. 108 (B196)
    Dvorak: The Water Goblin, Op. 107 (B195)
    Dvorak: The Wild Dove, Op. 110 (B198)
    Falla: Noches en los jardines de España
    Gluck: Iphigénie en Tauride: Pylades' arias
    Grieg: Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16
    Handel: Crude furie degli orridi abissi (from Serse)
    Handel: L'angue offeso (from Giulio Cesare)
    Handel: Music for the Royal Fireworks, HWV351
    Handel: Ombra mai fu (from Serse)
    Handel: Più che penso alle fiamme del core (from Serse)
    Handel: Se bramate d’amar chi vi sdegna (from Serse)
    Handel: Son nata a lagrimar (from Giulio Cesare)
    Handel: Svegliatevi nel core (from Giulio Cesare)
    Handel: Water Music Suites Nos. 1-3, HWV348-350
    Hartmann, K: Symphony No. 4
    Hartmann, K: Symphony No. 8
    Haydn: Mass, Hob. XXII: 9 in C major 'Paukenmesse'
    Janáček: Capriccio for piano (left hand) & chamber ensemble, JW VII/12 'Vzdor'
    Janáček: Concertino, JW VII/11
    Janáček: Glagolitic Mass
    Janáček: Sinfonietta
    Janáček: Taras Bulba
    Janáček: The Diary of One Who Disappeared
    Kubelik, R: Quattro Forme per Archi
    Mahler: Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen
    Mahler: Symphonies 1-9
    Mahler: Symphony No. 1 in D major 'Titan'
    Mahler: Symphony No. 2 'Resurrection'
    Mahler: Symphony No. 3
    Mahler: Symphony No. 4
    Mahler: Symphony No. 5
    Mahler: Symphony No. 6 in A minor 'Tragic'
    Mahler: Symphony No. 7
    Mahler: Symphony No. 8 in E flat major 'Symphony of a Thousand'
    Mahler: Symphony No. 9
    Martinon: Violin Concerto, Op. 51
    Martinů: Piano Concerto No. 5, H366 'Fantasia concertante'
    Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night's Dream - incidental music, Op. 61
    Mozart: Ave verum corpus, K618
    Mozart: Clarinet Concerto in A major, K622
    Mozart: Mass in C major, K317 'Coronation Mass'
    Mozart: Missa Brevis in C major, K220 'Spatzenmesse'
    Mozart: Serenade No. 7 in D major, K250 'Haffner'
    Mozart: Symphony No. 38 in D major, K504 'Prague'
    Orff: Oedipus der Tyrann
    Pfitzner: Palestrina
    Schoenberg: Gurrelieder
    Schoenberg: Piano Concerto, Op. 42
    Schoenberg: Violin Concerto, Op. 36
    Schumann: Genoveva Overture
    Schumann: Introduction & Allegro appassionato in G major, Op. 92
    Schumann: Manfred Overture, Op. 115
    Schumann: Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54
    Schumann: Symphonies Nos. 1-4
    Schumann: Symphony No. 1 in B flat major, Op. 38 'Spring'
    Schumann: Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61
    Schumann: Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 97 'Rhenish'
    Schumann: Symphony No. 4 in D minor, Op. 120
    Smetana: Hakon Jarl
    Smetana: Má Vlast
    Smetana: Richard III
    Smetana: The Prague Carnival - Introduction & Polonaise
    Smetana: Wallenstein's Camp
    Stravinsky: Circus Polka
    Stravinsky: Scherzo a la Russe
    Tcherepnin: Piano Concerto No. 2, Op. 26
    Tcherepnin: Piano Concerto No. 5, Op. 96
    Verdi: Rigoletto
    Wagner: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Overture
    Wagner: Lohengrin
    Wagner: Lohengrin: Prelude to Act 1
    Wagner: Siegfried Idyll
    Wagner: Tristan und Isolde: Prelude & Liebestod
    Weber: Abu Hassan Overture
    Weber: Clarinet Concerto No. 1 in F minor, Op. 73
    Weber: Der Freischütz Overture
    Weber: Jubel-Ouvertüre, J245 (Op. 59)
    Weber: Oberon
    Weber: Oberon Overture
    Weber: Preciosa, Overture J279 (Op. 78)
    Last edited by Mollie John; Jun-01-2019 at 11:54.

  17. #40
    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Attachment 119397

    Riccardo Chailly - The Symphony Edition

    Celebrating 40 Years on Decca


    • 55 CD original jacket, original couplings collection celebrating Maestro Riccardo Chailly’s 40 years on Decca

    • Includes complete cycles of Beethoven, Brahms (x2), Schumann (x2), Bruckner and Mahler

    • Featuring the orchestras with whom Chailly has been most closely associated: the Gewandhausorchester, the Royal Concertgebouw, and the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin

    • 120pp perfect bound book, including: a new retrospective by James Jolly with interviews with Maestro Chailly and his Decca producers (English/German/Italian)

    • Includes the award-winning Beethoven and Brahms cycles from Leipzig and critically-acclaimed reference cycles of Mahler and Bruckner from Amsterdam

    • Schumann’s symphonies with both the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and, in Mahler’s orchestrations, the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra

    • The sonically spectacular Messiaen Turangalîla-Symphonie with Jean-Yves Thibaudet

    • Zemlinsky’s rare early Symphony in B Flat plus the Lyric Symphony (originally released in Decca’s Entartete Musik series)

    • Cesar Franck’s Symphony in D minor and Symphonic Variations with Jorge Bolet as soloist

    • Mendelssohn 2 ‘Lobgesang’ from his inaugural concerts as Music Director of the Gewandhaus (Mendelssohn’s own orchestra) using the composer’s original published score (the first conductor to record this version) & the late-analogue recording in the revised version with the London Philharmonic: first released in 1980 on Philips LP

    • Mendelssohn 3 ‘Scottish’ with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra in the 1842 London version” & in the revised more familiar score with the London Symphony Orchestra

    • Berio’s Sinfonia, recorded in the presence of the composer himself

    Riccardo Chailly was born into a musical family in Milan. He studied at theconservatories in Milan and Perugia and received specialized training in conducting from Franco Ferrara at his Siena summer courses. At the age of 20, Chailly became assistant conductor to Claudio Abbado at Milan’s La Scala.

    He made his opera debut there in 1978 and was soon in great demand at the world’s leading opera houses and concert halls. His recorded repertoire ranges from the music of Bach and the great classical symphonic and operatic works to contemporary compositions. Chailly’s ‘symphonic’ career can be broadly described in three chapters: his first major post was with the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra (now the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin) from 1982 to 1988. Then in 1988, he moved to the great Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam (the ensemble gained its ‘Royal’ prefix during his tenure there) where he stayed until 2004. In 2005, he moved on to the venerable Gewandhausorchester in
    Leipzig, an ensemble to which he’d been introduced nearly 20 years earlier by no less a figure than Herbert von Karajan who maybe discerned in his young Italian colleague a fascination with tradition and the challenge of re-energising it in a modern age.

    In 2016, in a move that had a real inevitability about it, he announced his departure from Leipzig to return to his spiritual home and take musical charge of La Scala, Milan.
    An exclusive Decca artist for over three decades, Chailly has held a fascination with how you keep a tradition alive yet invigorate it and evolve. His recordings reflect the traditions of the great orchestras he has led while embracing the necessity to inhabit the presence, bringing a freshness and vigour to familiar works without concession to established performance styles; to listen anew.


  18. #41
    Senior Member Barelytenor's Avatar
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    Default Sir András Schiff Complete Beethoven Piano Sonatas

    I have really enjoyed getting to know Sir András Schiff's interpretations of the 32 Beethoven Piano Sonatas in conjunction with his lectures on each one live at Wigmore Hall.

    Here's the set, 10 CDs plus one CD of encores.

    Lectures link:
    https://wigmore-hall.org.uk/podcasts...cture-recitals

    Kind regards,

    PS Currently USD$70 on Amazon.

    George
    Last edited by Barelytenor; Jun-01-2019 at 12:32. Reason: more info

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  20. #42
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barelytenor View Post
    I have really enjoyed getting to know Sir András Schiff's interpretations of the 32 Beethoven Piano Sonatas in conjunction with his lectures on each one live at Wigmore Hall.

    Here's the set, 10 CDs plus one CD of encores.

    Lectures link:
    https://wigmore-hall.org.uk/podcasts...cture-recitals

    Kind regards,

    PS Currently USD$70 on Amazon.

    George
    I'm a huge fan of Sir András but I have been skeptical of his Beethoven in the past. I'll have to give it another shot. If I like it, it wouldn't hurt to have another Beethoven sonatas cycle in the collection. Especially interesting to me are the 32 lectures. Thanks for the link to those!

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  22. #43
    Senior Member Barelytenor's Avatar
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    Well, I think anyone would agree that his playing is idiosyncratic, but the lectures do give the listener pause and help explain some of his musical choices ... all of which are clearly very well-considered, whether you like/agree with them or not. For example, leaving the pedal down continuously in the first movement of the so-called (not by Beethoven) Moonlight Sonata, which produces an interesting schmear of sound, quite impressionistic. So ... you're welcome!

    There is also an interesting series of free courses on the Coursera.org MOOC education website on the Beethoven sonatas, taught by pianist Jonathan Biss, for a completely different point of view. "Exploring Beethoven's Piano Sonatas" from Curtis Institute.

    Kind regards,

    George

  23. #44
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barelytenor View Post
    Well, I think anyone would agree that his playing is idiosyncratic, but the lectures do give the listener pause and help explain some of his musical choices ... all of which are clearly very well-considered, whether you like/agree with them or not. For example, leaving the pedal down continuously in the first movement of the so-called (not by Beethoven) Moonlight Sonata, which produces an interesting schmear of sound, quite impressionistic. So ... you're welcome!

    There is also an interesting series of free courses on the Coursera.org MOOC education website on the Beethoven sonatas, taught by pianist Jonathan Biss, for a completely different point of view. "Exploring Beethoven's Piano Sonatas" from Curtis Institute.

    Kind regards,

    George
    Mr. Biss has been doing a series of concerts here in my city of the entire Beethoven sonata cycle. Sadly, I have not made it out to any. I'll have to catch one before it's all done.

  24. #45
    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mollie John View Post
    They could market this one as the Kubelik Kube!
    "All of Italian opera can be heard in [Bellini's] "Ah! non creda [mirarti]."
    --Renata Scotto in "Scotto, More Than a DIva."

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