Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 50 of 50

Thread: Salieri in the New Yorker

  1. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    942
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stomanek View Post
    Its astounding that Vienna didn't go nuts for Mozart - period.

    It did eventually of course.
    They do now, LOL. It’s my favorite city - I go every summer. Mozart is to be found every where there. There is a large monument to him in the palace garden. There’s also a grand monument to Beethoven, and a very famous one to Strauss II, and Schubert gets a small one in the Stadt Park.

    I visit them all every year, even though I’m not a huge Strauss fan, my mom is. The best is the Central Cemetery. Two of my favorites entombed right next to each other - Beethoven and Schubert, with a Mozart memorial in the center of the musicians ring. Brahms is there too, and so are a bunch of the Strauss’s. Really something to see. Had no idea Salieri was there until recently. Of course, he’s not with these other musicians but I will seek him out and maybe leave some flowers.

    That city is a classical music, architecture and garden lovers paradise. It is the place I am most happy.

    But, they do love their Mozart. Too bad they didn’t when he was alive. I hope, somehow, where ever he is, he knows.
    Follow me on Instragam: figaro_under_the_moonlight.

  2. Likes Larkenfield liked this post
  3. #47
    Senior Member stomanek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,222
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gellio View Post
    They do now, LOL. It’s my favorite city - I go every summer. Mozart is to be found every where there. There is a large monument to him in the palace garden. There’s also a grand monument to Beethoven, and a very famous one to Strauss II, and Schubert gets a small one in the Stadt Park.

    I visit them all every year, even though I’m not a huge Strauss fan, my mom is. The best is the Central Cemetery. Two of my favorites entombed right next to each other - Beethoven and Schubert, with a Mozart memorial in the center of the musicians ring. Brahms is there too, and so are a bunch of the Strauss’s. Really something to see. Had no idea Salieri was there until recently. Of course, he’s not with these other musicians but I will seek him out and maybe leave some flowers.

    That city is a classical music, architecture and garden lovers paradise. It is the place I am most happy.

    But, they do love their Mozart. Too bad they didn’t when he was alive. I hope, somehow, where ever he is, he knows.
    Well - I hope it is true love and not exploitation just for the tourist revenue. I like Vienna too. A lot of the city is still old style or at least it looks like it did in the 60s - like the internet doesn't exist. Some very good cafes. Yes and a Mozart fan will always feel good in Vienna - he seems to own the city more than any other composer, which is, in my view - as it should be, at last.

  4. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    942
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stomanek View Post
    Well - I hope it is true love and not exploitation just for the tourist revenue. I like Vienna too. A lot of the city is still old style or at least it looks like it did in the 60s - like the internet doesn't exist. Some very good cafes. Yes and a Mozart fan will always feel good in Vienna - he seems to own the city more than any other composer, which is, in my view - as it should be, at last.
    I think it’s true love. The first opera to be performed at the opening of the State Opera House in 1869 was Don Giovanni. It reopened in 1955, after extensive World War II damage, with a performance of Fidelio. I love that - my two favorite composers getting their due.

    When I was there in 2015, I didn’t pay attention to what was on schedule, and I was walking by one night and the performance of Fidelio was being broadcast on a huge screen on the side of the opera house. I loved that.

    Now, the whole Sisi (Empress Elisabeth) love every where is perhaps for exploitation. She was very unhappy in Vienna, and rarely there. The people didn’t know her at all, but now she is every where in Vienna.
    Follow me on Instragam: figaro_under_the_moonlight.

  5. #49
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    160
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stomanek View Post
    There are some anecdotes regarding the emperor crying out "Bravo Mozart" at one of his concerts. But there is little else otherwise. Along with the general Viennese he seems to have preferred other composers....
    There is a very touching story about this, not apocryphal but true. Mozart once said that before he died, he would know that he had finally touched the hearts of his listeners if nobody clapped—being too moved to clap. This is exactly what happened upon the first performance of The Magic Flute. Mozart had found his Viennese audience. The audience was so moved by the opera that they sat in stunned silence. As everyone knows, Mozart died soon afterward.

    I think that if Mozart had lived just another ten years, his story would have been very different. He found his niche with The Magic Flute. Schikenader would have commissioned a sequel from Mozart and the rest would have been history. As it happens, Schikenader did commission a sequel from Peter von Winter called Das Labyrinth.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/16/a...-premiere.html
    Last edited by vtpoet; Jun-24-2019 at 01:14.

  6. #50
    Senior Member stomanek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,222
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vtpoet View Post
    There is a very touching story about this, not apocryphal but true. Mozart once said that before he died, he would know that he had finally touched the hearts of his listeners if nobody clapped—being too moved to clap. This is exactly what happened upon the first performance of The Magic Flute. Mozart had found his Viennese audience. The audience was so moved by the opera that they sat in stunned silence. As everyone knows, Mozart died soon afterward.

    I think that if Mozart had lived just another ten years, his story would have been very different. He found his niche with The Magic Flute. Schikenader would have commissioned a sequel from Mozart and the rest would have been history. As it happens, Schikenader did commission a sequel from Peter von Winter called Das Labyrinth.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/16/a...-premiere.html
    oh no - how could he

    shrewd operator though

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •