Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2345678 LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 107

Thread: To the Wagner addicts:

  1. #76
    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,528
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    137

    Default

    Yeah, ha ha! And then, back to the bedroom to sneak a one-hitter by the open window, then mouthwash...
    "The way out is through the door. Why is it that no one will use this method?"
    -Confucious

    "In Spring! In the creation of art it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg

    "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us." -Jean-Paul Sartre

    "I don't mind dying, as long as I can still breathe." ---Me

  2. #77
    Senior Member Couchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    2,673
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Wagner is a desert oasis. Beyond him, you eat sand.
    Doch dieses Wörtlein: und, -wär' es zerstört,
    wie anders als mit Isoldes eignem Leben wär' Tristan der Tod gegeben?

  3. Likes Fritz Kobus liked this post
  4. #78
    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,528
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Couchie View Post
    Wagner is a desert oasis. Beyond him, you eat sand.
    To love Wagner, why must you destroy the world?
    "The way out is through the door. Why is it that no one will use this method?"
    -Confucious

    "In Spring! In the creation of art it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg

    "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us." -Jean-Paul Sartre

    "I don't mind dying, as long as I can still breathe." ---Me

  5. Likes Fritz Kobus liked this post
  6. #79
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    12,947
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OperaChic View Post
    Ever since my first introduction to and subsequent exploration of Wagner's music and art I've felt something uniquely seductive about his works that set him apart from most other composers or artists of any field for that matter. Although I still haven't been able to pin down what makes him so extraordinary, I'm sure it's a quality that all Wagnerians pick up on to some extent, and why he plays a significant role in our lives. I can see why in a sense his work is dangerous and potentially addictive. It is so absorbing, so various, and seemingly so inclusive that it can be tempting to want to live life through the music dramas themselves. They do contain a sort of thriling and vigourous energy that I imagine most people's lives lack on a day to day basis. It is an astonishing quality of Wagner's art that it can provide enough emotional and spiritual nourishment to make people feel like they possibly don't need anything else; however, taking this route is most certainly detrimental in the long run. Like most of my fellow Wagnerians I'm sure, I've discovered the true value of his operas is in their ability of to enrich life: they are full of revelations, directives and challenges which help me make better sense of my experiences and to think with renewed clarity on wider existential questions.

    .
    "Wagner's music is a drug; Verdi's is a tonic." (Peter Conrad - Verdi and/or Wagner)

  7. #80
    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,528
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    "Wagner's music is a drug; Verdi's is a tonic." (Peter Conrad - Verdi and/or Wagner)
    To love Wagner, why must you become a drug addict?
    "The way out is through the door. Why is it that no one will use this method?"
    -Confucious

    "In Spring! In the creation of art it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg

    "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us." -Jean-Paul Sartre

    "I don't mind dying, as long as I can still breathe." ---Me

  8. Likes Fritz Kobus liked this post
  9. #81
    Senior Member Couchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    2,673
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    To love Wagner, why must you destroy the world?
    Descend,
    O Night of love,
    grant oblivion
    that I may live;
    take me up
    into your bosom,
    release me from
    the world!
    Doch dieses Wörtlein: und, -wär' es zerstört,
    wie anders als mit Isoldes eignem Leben wär' Tristan der Tod gegeben?

  10. #82
    Senior Member Couchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    2,673
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OperaChic View Post
    Ever since my first introduction to and subsequent exploration of Wagner's music and art I've felt something uniquely seductive about his works that set him apart from most other composers or artists of any field for that matter. Although I still haven't been able to pin down what makes him so extraordinary, I'm sure it's a quality that all Wagnerians pick up on to some extent, and why he plays a significant role in our lives. I can see why in a sense his work is dangerous and potentially addictive. It is so absorbing, so various, and seemingly so inclusive that it can be tempting to want to live life through the music dramas themselves. They do contain a sort of thriling and vigourous energy that I imagine most people's lives lack on a day to day basis. It is an astonishing quality of Wagner's art that it can provide enough emotional and spiritual nourishment to make people feel like they possibly don't need anything else; however, taking this route is most certainly detrimental in the long run. Like most of my fellow Wagnerians I'm sure, I've discovered the true value of his operas is in their ability of to enrich life: they are full of revelations, directives and challenges which help me make better sense of my experiences and to think with renewed clarity on wider existential questions.
    It's simply the transcendental quality, the same quality of some drugs and religions, which lure in and entrance Wagnerians.
    Doch dieses Wörtlein: und, -wär' es zerstört,
    wie anders als mit Isoldes eignem Leben wär' Tristan der Tod gegeben?

  11. #83
    Junior Member Music Snob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    47
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I went from The Beach Boys to Mozart... and then to Wagner. What's next is a very tough question. I'm going to give Bruckner a shot.
    http://www.jonmurphyart.com/

    "Owing to the present mania for Regie and decor, which is a cancer on operatic life, much too much money is being spent on these two aspects of opera. This disease, this tyranny must be broken." Walter Legge

  12. #84
    Senior Member Zhdanov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    moscow, russia.
    Posts
    935
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    listen to Wagner because he was one of those best who built the world to come as of 20th century on.

  13. #85
    Senior Member Larkenfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sedona
    Posts
    3,842
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bz3 View Post
    If you're a former addict, of which I know there are many, where did you go after your blurred obsession with Wagner?

    I mean this sincerely and out of curiosity, I'm not interested in litigating the relative fandom of composers or whether Wagner had 'something wrong' with him. I mean plainly where did former Wagner obsessors go afterward?

    For instance when I joined this forum I listened to all sorts, mostly late baroque through Romantic, and heavily based on what I played when I was younger. For the last couple of years it's just Wagner I listen to. Yes there's occasional late Beethoven, Brahms chamber, Bach organ or piano, or Romantic piano - especially at work. But beyond that I just listen to Wagner, watch it, etc.

    So for those ladies and gents who experienced Wagner like this in their 20s, 30s, 40s or even later, what came next?
    I don’t think it’s any coincidence that both Wagner and Verdi were born in 1813. I see them as a necessary and valuable counterbalance to each other in life. I find them considerably different with Wagner wisely writing both the music and librettos, and Verdi writing something based on Othello, which I consider a masterpiece. Both portray the human condition in different ways and can benefit the understanding of each other. Both have greatly benefited the world with their respective outlooks and their own musical vocabularies. I don’t believe in coincidences of birth.
    Last edited by Larkenfield; Jul-22-2019 at 12:40.
    "That's all Folks!"

  14. Likes The Conte liked this post
  15. #86
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    12,947
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zhdanov View Post
    listen to Wagner because he was one of those best who built the world to come as of 20th century on.
    Built the world? As most people in the world have never heard of Wagner how come he built it? Come on, we've got to get out of our classical music bubble into the real world!

  16. #87
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    12,947
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larkenfield View Post
    I don’t think it’s any coincidence that both Wagner and Verdi were born in 1813. I see them as a necessary and valuable counterbalance to each other in life. I find them considerably different with Wagner wisely writing both the music and librettos, and Verdi writing something based on Othello, which I consider a masterpiece. Both portray the human condition in different ways and can benefit the understanding of each other. Both have greatly benefited the world with their respective outlooks and their own musical vocabularies. I don’t believe in coincidences.
    Wagner might have been better off if he'd have had help with his librettos. Verdi's are generally much better as he and his librettists were able to play off against each other. With Boito they reached a level of almost perfection

  17. #88
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    1,422
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Music Snob View Post
    I went from The Beach Boys to Mozart... and then to Wagner. What's next is a very tough question. I'm going to give Bruckner a shot.
    I'd suggest Mahler, if you haven't tried him already. Nothing wrong with Bruckner, but Mahler will "stretch" you a bit more.

  18. Likes NLAdriaan, The Conte liked this post
  19. #89
    Senior Member Zhdanov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    moscow, russia.
    Posts
    935
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    As most people in the world have never heard of Wagner how come he built it?
    since people never know anything then its no wonder they never heard of him.

  20. #90
    Senior Member Zhdanov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    moscow, russia.
    Posts
    935
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larkenfield View Post
    Wagner wisely writing both the music and librettos
    i don't believe he wrote librettos... well, at least someone helped him.

    a man who created such music just would not have been able to write librettos so complex.

    same for a man who penned such librettos wouldn't have been capable of composing music so grand.

Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2345678 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •