Banner: The Hope for brass band, organ, choir, and percussion

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 59 of 59

Thread: Favourite Movie Directors

  1. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    1,326
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    George Cukor is a favourite director; having come from the Broadway stage he knew how to coach great performances from a cast. One of his most famous films, "Dinner at Eight" (1933), is very good and has some real comedy, as well as drama, liberally spread throughout. Stand-out performances in this film (which will soon be 100 years old!!): Screenplay Herman Mankiewicz and Donald Ogden Stewart.

    Jean Harlow as the feisty blond bombshell with plenty of 'nerve' to tell people just what she thinks. The last lines of the film between Harlow and Dressler represent one of the greatest endings in film; up there with "well, nobody's perfect"!! Harlow was only to live another 4 years after this film was made.

    Marie Dressler (who was terminally ill with cancer when this film was made) is wonderful as the elderly stage actress, which she delivers with aplomb, humour and style.

    John Barrymore; as the wash-up, alcoholic actor. Never better in this film and there's a terribly moving scene when he realizes he's finished. Very prophetic for the sad and tragic Barrymore.

    Billie Burke: she of "The Wizard of Oz"; scatty but strong and determined. Another feisty female role.

    The film is obviously hugely dated now and that 'cardboard' sound of 1933 - when microphones were hidden on the set or other unlikely places (see 'Singin' in the Rain') - it is still highly recommended for film buffs who like great writing, acting and direction.

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x73kskr
    Last edited by Christabel; May-04-2020 at 23:30. Reason: John, not Lionel Barrymore

  2. Likes Mascagnian liked this post
  3. #47
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Martin Scorsese, Denis Villeneuve

  4. Likes MAS liked this post
  5. #48
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    40
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    easy: apichatpong weerasethakul!! yes it is slow/artsy-type foreign cinema, but it's also funny, and charming, and weird, and beautiful...

  6. #49
    Senior Member MAS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christabel View Post
    Billy Wilder: "Seven Year Itch", "Some Like it Hot", "Stalag 17", "Double Indemnity", "1,2,3", "Witness for the Prosecution", "Sabrina"
    Howard Hawks: "His Girl Friday", "Bringing up Baby", "Ball of Fire", "The Big Sleep", "Red River", "Rio Bravo", "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes".
    Alfred Hitchcock; "Vertigo", "Psycho", "Rear Window", "Shadow of a Doubt", "Strangers on a Train"
    John Ford: "The Searchers", "How Green was my Valley", "The Grapes of Wrath", "The Informer", the Cavalry trilogy
    George Stevens: "Talk of the Town", "Woman of the Year", "Shane", "A Place in the Sun", "Giant"
    George Cukor: "The Philadelphia Story", "The Women", "Adam's Rib", "A Star is Born"
    Vincente Minnelli: "An American in Paris", "Some Came Running", "The Bandwagon", "Designing Woman"
    Elia Kazan: everything!!

    Martin Scorsese: "Raging Bull", "The Age of Innocence"
    James L. Brooks: "Terms of Endearment", "As Good as it Gets"
    Mike Nichols: "The Remains of the Day", "The Birdcage
    The Coen Brothers: "The Big Lebowski", "The Man who Wasn't There", "No Country for Old Men", "Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?"
    I don’t think Mike Nichols directed The Remains of the Day, but James Ivory

  7. #50
    Senior Member MAS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    In no particular order:
    Blake Edwards
    Terry Gilliam
    Steven Spielberg
    Martín Scorsese
    John Boorman
    John Ford
    George Cuckor
    François Truffaut
    Luchino Visconti
    Mike Nichols
    Sergio Leone
    Ingmar Bergman
    James Ivory
    John Huston
    Billy Wilder
    Élia Kazan
    Akira Kurosawa
    Stanley Kubrick
    William Wyler
    Vincente Minnelli
    George Stevens
    Orson Welles
    Joseph L. Mankiewicz
    Last edited by MAS; Aug-16-2020 at 21:04.

  8. #51
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    1,326
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MAS View Post
    I don’t think Mike Nichols directed The Remains of the Day, but James Ivory
    Something went wrong with my list - Mike Nichols PRODUCED "Remains of the Day". And, of course, he didn't direct that film!! It shouldn't have been on that list, which is correct in all other respects.
    Last edited by Christabel; Aug-16-2020 at 22:11.

  9. #52
    Senior Member MAS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,658
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christabel View Post
    Something went wrong with my list - Mike Nichols PRODUCED "Remains of the Day". And, of course, he didn't direct that film!! It shouldn't have been on that list, which is correct in all other respects.
    No worries, I only noticed because I love James Ivory!

  10. #53
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Denis Villeneuve!

  11. #54
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Billy Wilder
    William Wyler
    Alfred Hitchcock
    John Ford
    Howard Hawks
    Fritz Lang
    Charlie Chaplin
    Robert Altman
    Roman Polanski
    Coen Brothers

  12. #55
    Member Ned Low's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    75
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Woody Allen, Ingmar Bergman, Stanley Kubrick, Luis Bunuel, Carl Theodore Dryer, Lars von Trier, Hirukazo Koreeda, Philippe Garrel, Wim Wenders, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Gaspar Noe, Edward Yang, Andrei Svyangitsev, Francois Ozon, Christoph Honore, Angela Schanelec

  13. Likes Christabel liked this post
  14. #56
    Senior Member BlackAdderLXX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    761
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    In the past decade the list is pretty short:
    Edgar Wright
    Quentin Tarantino
    If I had a time machine I'd go back and warn these artists about their album covers

  15. #57
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    1,326
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terrapin View Post
    Billy Wilder
    William Wyler
    Alfred Hitchcock
    John Ford
    Howard Hawks
    Fritz Lang
    Charlie Chaplin
    Robert Altman
    Roman Polanski
    Coen Brothers
    What a great list!!! Billy Wilder, you are so very much loved and much-missed.

    I watched "Stalag 17" again over the weekend. Classic film; wonderful script and great direction. When you look at it a couple of times you'll notice the sight gags of Wilder; they're in there without drawing attention away from the main action. A look here, a move there - full of comedy and character insight. The man was a genius. Raised in Vienna, this European Jew had a sophistication and self-deprecating humour which contributed incalculably to the Hollywood of the 1930s and beyond. His films are at once inherently American and laced with European insights. Europe's loss in the 20th century was America's huge gain. Lubitsch was another one; there are dozens of them. Wilder and Lubitsch worked on 'Ninotchka" in 1939; ".....it's a good idea - but who said we had to have an idea?!"

  16. #58
    Senior Member Dulova Harps On's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    402
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Some faves:

    F. W. Murnau
    Jacques Rivette
    Stanley Kubrick
    Max Ophuls
    Jean Pierre Melville
    Yasujirō Ozu
    Rolf de Heer
    Robert Altman
    Peter Weir
    Jacques Tourneur
    Nicholas Ray
    Michael Curtiz
    Ernst Lubitsch
    Fritz Lang
    Marcel Pagnol
    Rene Clair
    Joseph Losey
    Last edited by Dulova Harps On; Nov-10-2020 at 03:11.

  17. Likes Christabel liked this post
  18. #59
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    1,326
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've always been a huge admirer of David Lean and his cinematic eye. Here's something I just found about Lean and the making of "Dr. Zhivago". Apparently the director wasn't too well loved, and these rather blunt comments from Omar Sharif are very telling. I'd forgotten about this because it's been some time since I read the excellent biographical tome on Lean by Kevin Brownlow:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihKuDCD8qjo

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •