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Thread: Bach Symphonic Transcriptions

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpowders View Post
    I've never listened to any transcription of Bach that I would want to hear a second time.

    Call me a purist. It's the original or nothing.
    I think the reviewer of this recording mentioned it clearly and put it eloquently....

    http://www.allmusic.com/album/bach-t...s-mw0001828976

    "Cranked-up," "Rock 'n' Roll," "thick shag of strings": these are just a few of the unlikely descriptions used by the writer of the liner notes for his release in a useless attempt to justify the ways of transcription to man. But no justification is possible or even necessary. To the purist, a transcription is an abomination in the ears of God and man, and any transcription is a mortal sin against the art of Bach. But that hardly matters since this disc is clearly not for purists; it's for music lovers who want to rock with Bach. And this disc does rock, loud and hard. After some fairly snoozy years under the aging André Previn, the Los Angeles Philharmonic under music director Esa-Pekka Salonen has become one of the great virtuoso orchestras in the country, fully capable of playing Mahler, Stravinsky, Messiaen or even Bach transcriptions with fire and precision.

    As you might expect, the disc starts with the most (in)famous Bach transcription of all time: the Stokowski Toccata and Fugue in D minor. Apparently, to Stokowski, Bach was a chubby German burgher with a penchant for flashy clothes and cheap jewelry: his transcription of the Toccata is overdressed, fat, and slow. Salonen gives the devil his due and grants Stokowski all the ponderous weight the LAPO can summon. He even goes so far as to slow down at the stretto just before the climax of the fugue. One imagines that Stokowski would have loved it. Amazingly enough, the rest of the disc isn't anticlimatic. The Elgar C minor Fantasy and Fugue is a moving example of Elgarian Nobilmente at its best. The Schoenberg "St. Anne" Prelude and Fugue is boisterous good fun. And the Mahler Suite is an infectious confection.

    On its own terms, this disc is highly recommended.

    AllMusic Review by James Leonar
    Last edited by Aggelos; Feb-19-2016 at 17:19.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukecash12 View Post
    Well thank God for Mitropoulos. Those woodwind parts are something else, and Casella's scores for it are utterly saturated with creativity. The music is dripping with intermittent excitement and austerity. It's as if he is wringing every bit of emotional subtext out of the original, with his pizzicati, airy and flighty woodwind passages, overwhelming gravitas of the horns as they resound the melody, and then the festive and beautiful use of the horns as we move into the major section. Two utterly enthralling musical minds meet!

    Casella surely has the ability to render the dark Spanish atmosphere, the grandiose of the baroque era, the virtuoso elements of the violin idiom.
    Mitropoulos performed the Bach-Casella on October 12th 1950 with the NY Philharmonic. These are the program notes
    http://archives.nyphil.org/index.php...edf18/fullview




    On the other hand, how do you think the Bach-Hubay Chaconne went down when it was introduced by Eugene Ormandy (on July 23rd 1934)?
    http://archives.nyphil.org/index.php...bf042/fullview




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    I think transcriptions of Bach's music comprise some of the greatest pieces in the world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Klassic View Post
    I think transcriptions of Bach's music comprise some of the greatest pieces in the world.
    It depends on what kind of transcription we are dealing with..... Plush and lavish orchestral transcriptions of Bach's music have been a bone of contention. However, they helped popularize Bach's music in the 20th century.






    http://www.sa-cd.net/showtitle/5106
    http://avex.jp/classics/artist/shimono/disc_e.html


    Speaking of chaconnes, paring Corigiliano's Symphony with a transcription of Bach's Chaconne might seem odd, but the thematic connection should be obvious. Hideo Saitoh's colorful transcription clarifies the counterpoint, and it seems to be at least partially based on Busoni's piano arrangement.

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    Bach’s Greatest Fugues - Scored for Double Orchestra
    St. Anne Fugue in E flat, Little Fugue in G minor,
    Fugue in D, Great Fugue in G minor,
    Fugue in A minor, Fugue in C Minor, Fugue in C
    Philadelphia Orchestra/Eugene Ormandy
    http://www.highdeftapetransfers.com/...phia-orchestra


    These are probably transcriptions by Eugene Ormandy, Arthur Harris and Thomas T. Frost

    http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Arran/OT-Ormandy.htm
    http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Arran/OT-Harris-A.htm
    http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Arran/OT-Frost-T.htm






    http://www.musicweb-international.co..._Bach_HDTT.htm
    http://www.audaud.com/bachs-greatest...dtt-audio-onl/

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    Bach-Stokowski "Ich ruf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ" - George Cleve conducts
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yh_yRPiezYg
    This sublime Organ Chorale Prelude, transcribed by Stokowski and first recorded by him in 1927 as 'I Call Upon Thee,' is here performed by the San Francisco Orchestra under George Cleve. He was born in Austria in 1936 and brought to America while still a young boy. He studied music in New York and eventually became a US citizen. However, he is little known as a conductor these days, largely because he could be tyrannical and over-demanding, something which doubtless held back a conducting career that was spent entirely in America. In addition, he wasn't a recording artist, so his name hasn't been familiar to record collectors. Still, as this brief item from a 1986 radio broadcast shows, he was able to achieve beautiful playing from the San Francisco band. In 2015, Cleve died at the age of 79 in California.




    Bach-Stokowski - Passacaglia & Fugue in C minor - Matthias Bamert conducts
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAlCdGsgVtQ
    Matthias Bamert was for several years Stokowski's Assistant Conductor at the American Symphony Orchestra. In tribute to the great maestro, he recorded half-a-dozen CDs of Stokowski Transcriptions and also performed many of them in concert. Here is his splendid account of a great Bach arrangement, recorded during the 1996 Proms with the BBC Symphony at London's Royal Albert Hall. His CDs of Stokowski Transcriptions can be found on the 'Chandos' label. The Bach CD referred to by the announcer at the start also features the Passacaglia and Fugue, played by the BBC Philharmonic, on CHAN 9259.




    Bach: Toccata and Fugue in D minor - Skrowaczewski arranger / conductor
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HKOy9AgHk4
    This is a belated tribute to Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, who died earlier this year (21 February 2017) at the age of 93. The most famous orchestration of Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor for organ was made by Leopold Stokowski but a number of other musicians have also made orchestral transcriptions. Skrowaczewski's is among the most lavish and colourful and dates from the early 1960s. The performance heard here comes from a 1974 broadcast with the Minnesota Orchestra, of which he was then Music Director, and a splendid performance it is too!




    Bach-Stokowski: Toccata & Fugue in D minor - Comissiona / Asian Youth Orchestra
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-YIsyx4VG8
    Published on 13 September 2017 to mark the 40th Anniversary of Stokowski's death on 13 September 1977. This famous orchestral transcription of a celebrated Bach organ piece was played in a concert that marked the 10th Anniversary in 1999 of the Asian Youth Orchestra. Its players are made up of young musicians from many Asian countries and are heard here under their conductor laureate Sergiu Comissiona.





    Bach-Stokowski: Toccata and Fugue - Charles Dutoit conducts
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hK7uiD_xZYI
    This famous arrangement is being published to mark Leopold Stokowski's birthday (he was born on 18 April 1882). His orchestral transcription of Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor for organ has been taken up by many conductors and is played here by the NHK Symphony Orchestra of Tokyo under Charles Dutoit during his time as its principal conductor (1996-2003).




    Bach-Stokowski: Toccata & Fugue in D minor - Jacques Grimbert conducts
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyIt3FWKeSI
    Published 18 April 2016 to mark Stokowski's 134th birthday (born 18 April 1882) ... The most famous Bach orchestration of all is given scintillating French polish by the Orchestre de Paris-Sorbonne under the direction of Jacques Grimbert. It was recorded in 2000 in the Grand Amphitheatre de la Sorbonne, pictured in the Toccata. (From an 'Arsis Classics' CD.)





    Bach-Stokowski 'Siciliano' - Matthias Bamert conducts
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqGaHLR1tF0
    Many of Stokowski's Bach arrangements were simplicity itself. Here is one example, a transcription for strings of the lilting 'Siciliano' in Bach's Violin Sonata No. 4. The BBCPO is conducted by Matthias Bamert on this 1993 Chandos CD (CHAN 9259).




    Bach 'Come, Sweet Death' - Ormandy arranger / conductor
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgL7VnK54z8
    'Komm, süsser Tod' - Eugene Ormandy conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra in his own transcription of this poignant sacred song by Bach. It comes from a 1954 LP (now 'public domain') reissued on CD by Pristine Audio (PASC211).





    Bach-Cailliet: Preludio in E - Ormandy conducts
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9rm-S3XAgI
    When Eugene Ormandy began taking over the reigns of the Philadelphia Orchestra from Leopold Stokowski, he followed in the former Maestro's footsteps by conducting many orchestral transcriptions. These he commissioned from the orchestra's 'house arranger' and principal clarinet, Lucien Cailliet. Here is Cailliet's splendid orchestration of the Preludio in Bach's Solo Violin Partita No. 3 (BWV 1006). It was recorded in 1937 and can be heard, along with other Cailliet transcriptions, on Pristine Audio PASC 444



    ================================================== ================




    https://www.pentatonemusic.com/metro...-hilarion-bach
    http://www.musicweb-international.co...PTC5186593.htm
    https://www.hraudio.net/showmusic.php?title=12346

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY_umLlBmvs





    duttoncdlx7337.jpg
    https://www.duttonvocalion.co.uk/pro...?prod=CDLX7337
    https://www.hraudio.net/showmusic.php?title=12045





    This is scandalous.
    At least Lucien Cailliet can be vindicated through the internet and people can know who he was and what kind of "ghost" role he played as an orchestrator when Leopold Stokowski was a principal conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

    PASC444_0c6632dc-2633-4e3a-b5f8-cd041dabd55b_530x.jpg
    http://www.musicweb-international.co...ts_PASC444.htm
    https://www.pristineclassical.com/products/pasc444



    Transcriber, arranger and composer Lucien Cailliet was born in Dijon in 1891. He studied composition and orchestration in Dijon and Paris. During World War I, he was a bandmaster in the French Army Band, with which he toured the United States in 1915. Four years later, Leopold Stokowski hired him as a clarinetist for the Philadelphia Orchestra. Not long after his arrival, an orchestration of the Marseillaise was needed for a guest singer, and Cailliet volunteered to provide one. Pleased with the results, Stokowski continued to work with him over the next several years in his transcriptions of the works of Bach and others.

    Cailliet’s exact role in the orchestrations credited to Stokowski has long been a matter of controversy. Writing to Stokowski biographer Oliver Daniel in 1978, Cailliet said that the Marseillaise project “started me in doing all his orchestrations.”


    In fact, the next one he asked me [to do] was the [Bach] C Minor Passacaglia. Of course, we had some discussions before as, after all, he was an organist and a famous musician. [. . .] I must confide in you that as the situation developed, Stokowski asked me from the beginning not to mention or speak about it and keep the situation “entre nous” and adding: “The people would not understand.” That is how the name of Stokowski appeared on the programs as orchestrator.


    Earlier, however, in an interview with broadcaster Steve Cohen, Cailliet credited Stokowski with a greater role in the Passacaglia transcription: “It was his idea completely, and of course he was himself a very good orchestrator. He made a very good choice of instruments.”

    Based on the experiences of others who worked with Stokowski in producing transcriptions, it is believed that the conductor indicated his choices for instrumentation on the score for the transcriber to carry out. Stokowski would then edit and make further alterations to the score. Still, the collaborations with Stokowski provided Cailliet with valuable training.

    Cailliet was not credited for his transcriptions, at least on record, until Eugene Ormandy’s arrival in Philadelphia as co-conductor in 1936. (Indeed, the Bach Prelude and Fugue in F minor which opens our program was Ormandy’s very first recording with the Philadelphians.) Stokowski did record one transcription specifically credited to Cailliet (Turina’s Sacro-Monte),
    but it was never issued on 78s.

    In 1937, Cailliet left the orchestra to teach at the University of Southern California. Before his departure, Ormandy commissioned him to make his most significant transcription yet, that of Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Working in the shadow of Ravel’s already famous version must have been daunting, but Cailliet, writing for the ensemble he knew so intimately, acquitted himself well with his imaginative instrumentation. He also reinstated the Promenade before “Limoges”, cut by Ravel. This remains the only recording of Cailliet’s version, except for the “Ballet of the Chicks” movement, which Leonard Slatkin included in his composite edition using different orchestrations of the work.

    In the mid-1940s, Cailliet left teaching to work as an (often uncredited) orchestrator for Hollywood films, including such classics as She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, Red River and The Ten Commandments. He died in Los Angeles in 1985.



    Here you can preview Cailliet orchestration for J.S. Bach's Little Fugue in G Minor BWV 578
    https://www.carlfischer.com/shop/fug...78-little.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucien_Cailliet
    Last edited by Aggelos; Apr-16-2018 at 20:19.

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    The neglect of the Cailliet's Mussorgsky transcription is shameful. When Koussevitsky's exclusive performance rights were up, Ormandy only ever programmed and recorded the Ravel. His followers, Muti, Sawallisch, Eschenbach - all Ravel. The Philadelphia librarian once told me that the score and parts are in pretty fragile state. I hope that someone is attempting to preserve them for posterity. I am one of those who prefer the Cailliet over Ravel (I prefer Funtek's, too) and wish someone, bored to death of the Ravel, would take up Cailliet's. I took a workshop with Cailliet on writing for wind band many years ago. Fine gentleman, great teacher and full of wonderful stories. His Bach transcriptions are also over due for modern recordings.

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    You're right. His Bach transcriptions are long overdue for digital recordings.
    I think that the best representation of Bach-Cailliet is when Fiedler switched from RCA to Deutsche Grammophon in 1970s and recorded the Little Fugue in G Minor for the album "Symphonic Spectacular" . Fiedler seemed to have championed that orchestration over Stokowski's and so did Fritz Reiner.

    According to the Clinton Nieweg catalogue, the score and parts for the Mussrogsky-Cailliet orchestration do not match and various parts are not in playable form
    http://imslp.org/wiki/Orchestrations..._Exhibition%27
    Meaning that the idea of keeping it for posterity doesn't seem to be possible anymore.


    If you took a workshop with Cailliet himself, then it must have been many many years ago, since Cailliet passed away in 1985.
    It's shame that even Eugene Ormandy abandoned his orchestral transcriptions. Perhaps when Ormandy arrived at Philedalphia he learned about Cailliet's backstory on those (in)famous Stokowski orchestral transcriptions (since Stokowski was a famous personality with a tendency to include them in his programmes), thus I believe Ormandy must have wanted to do justice to the uncredited work of Cailliet by recording his orchestral transcriptions and even commissioning him to orchestrate Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition.
    But as years went by, it seems that most Philadelphia conductors let him be eclipsed by obscurity and the ravages of time.




    https://www.deutschegrammophon.com/en/cat/4776118
    https://www.allmusic.com/album/the-a...r-mw0001170440
    http://www.classicalcdreview.com/afied.html


    I was just wondering -> what are the chances for the following orchestration to see a digital recording some day
    -Bach / Lucien Cailliet : Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565 [Carl Fischer]
    https://www.carlfischer.com/shop/toc...n-bwv-565.html

    -Bach / Lucien Cailliet : Prelude and Fugue in G minor, BWV 558 [Carl Fischer]
    https://www.carlfischer.com/shop/pre...r-bwv-558.html

    -Bach / Lucien Cailliet : Come, Sweet Death (Komm, susser Tod), BWV 478 [Elkan-Vogel, Inc. ]
    https://www.carlfischer.com/shop/com...usser-tod.html

    -Bach / Lucien Cailliet : Jagdkantate, Schafe konnen sicher weiden, BWV 208 [Boosey & Hawkes]
    -Bach / Lucien Cailliet : Herzlich tut mich verlangen [Elkan-Vogel]


    ================================================== ========================


    -Bach / Herman Boessenroth : Prelude in E Major from Violin Sonata No. 6 [Elkan-Vogel, Inc. ]
    https://www.carlfischer.com/shop/pre...nata-no-6.html

    -Bach / Herman Boessenroth : "Wir glauben All' an einen Gott", BWV 680 [Elkan-Vogel, Inc. ]
    https://www.carlfischer.com/shop/cre...inen-gott.html

    -Bach / Herman Boessenroth : Passacaglia and Fugue in C Minor, BWV 582 [Elkan-Vogel, Inc. ]
    https://www.carlfischer.com/shop/pas...n-c-minor.html
    Last edited by Aggelos; Apr-17-2018 at 02:28.

  12. #54
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    The workshop I had with Cailliet was in 1976. He had written a fine booklet for Leblanc on the use and scoring for the clarinet choir in the symphonic band. He ardently believed that the wind band needed several Eb clarinets, a pair each of altos, bass clarinets and not only a contralto but a contrabass, too. It gave the band a depth and sonority that no other family of instruments could. Sadly, even then, the Eb, altos and contrabass were becoming rare, and most bands had one bass, usually played with an inferior player. I still have that booklet - brings back great memories. Sorry to hear about the status of the Cailliet Pictures transcription.

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    You shouldn't be sorry about the status of the Mussorgsky Cailliet. This is something that happened years ago, according to Clinton Nieweg.
    They tried to clean up the manuscripts for Leonard Slatkin's 1st Compendium suite. They realized that not everything was in playable condition anymore. Probably the ravages of time and obscurity had their toll on Cailliet's manuscripts.

    Orch. CAILLIET, Lucien (b. Chalon Sur Marne, France, 22 May, 1891; d. Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, CA, 3 January, 1985)
    Tableaux d’une Exhibition Orchestrated by Lucien Cailliet
    Commission by Eugene Ormandy, Music Director, The Philadelphia Orchestra
    3[1.2.3/pic] 3[1.2.EH] 5 or 4[1.2.3. bcl (+opt cbcl)] 3[1.2.cbn] — 4 4 3 1 – tmp+8 perc (glock, xyl, chimes, sd, tri, cym, wdblk, tamtam, bd) — 2 hp — str
    Dur. 27'34"

    “The unpublished manuscript set of parts was in The Philadelphia Orchestra library as of 1996, but many sections were not then in playable condition, as the score and parts do not match. Only the sections used in the compilation by Slatkin are in playable shape.” — Clinton F. Nieweg, Principal Librarian, (ret.), The Philadelphia Orchestra.


    http://www.orchestralibrary.com/Niew...ion%202016.pdf
    http://www.orchestralibrary.com/


    Mussorgsky-Slatkin 'Pictures at an Exhibition' - Compendium
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqD9zB4TjXw
    For a Proms concert in London's Royal Albert Hall in 1991, Leonard Slatkin introduced his own edition of Mussorgsky's 'Pictures at an Exhibition.' It featured the various 'Promenades' and 'Pictures' in different arrangements by an assortment of orchestrators. Ravel's version is the best known but other arrangers of Mussorgsky's piano work were Leopold Stokowski, Sir Henry Wood, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Mikhail Tushmalov, Lawrence Leonard, Lucien Cailliet, Sergei Gorchakov and Leonidas Leonardi, all of whom were featured in Slatkin's performance. As an encore, he brought the house down with Sir Henry Wood's version of 'The Great Gate of Kiev.'




    And those two have Leonardi Slatkin's 2nd compendium suite

    Respighi_Mussorgsky_2564619542.jpg
    Mussorgsky_Liszt_8570716.jpg
    http://www.musicweb-international.co...2564619542.htm
    http://www.musicweb-international.co...zt_8570716.htm


    ================================================== ===================

    So you met him in person...
    Aside from discussing about the instrumentation of the wind band and the composition of the various clarinets (that would give extra layers of texture to the wind band) did you have the chance to talk about his orchestral transcriptions?

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    I doubt that anybody could listen to Stokowski's transcription of the Chaconne and not be moved.

    IMG_1483.JPG

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveM View Post
    I doubt that anybody could listen to Stokowski's transcription of the Chaconne and not be moved.

    IMG_1483.JPG
    Did you acquire the Dutton SACD release? It seems they granted your wish (from back in December 2015)
    Bach Symphonic Transcriptions

    The quadraphonic recordings of the 1970s, have been restored by Dutton on a multi-channel SACD.

    http://www.classicalcdreview.com/MC610.HTML



    These commentaries explain the history of these remarkable four-trak recordings now issued for the first time in quality surround sound. This Stokowski album is a treasure. The Bach performances were recorded in London's St. Giles' Church April 1973, and producer Richard Mohr has captured an incredibly rich string sonorities. The Wagner was recorded in November 1973 in London's Abbey Road studios. Audio is OK, but relatively little use was made of rear speakers.



    This is one most interesting of the recent Dutton releases, for two principal reasons: it adopts a radical balancing of the orchestra and it is the first hi-resolution release of Stokowski conducting his own famous re-imagining of Bach.

    Modern exponents of surround recording of repertoire that isn't explicitly of the cori spezzati school of composition are companies like (in alphabetic order) 2L and Tacet. This licensed Sony recording predates their efforts by a generation and will likely divide listeners now as then as to the musical effectiveness of the myriad of seating positions adopted throughout the recording. In Stokowski, the engineers surely had the most appropriate of conductors with which they could jointly experiment: for all the pejorative jibes levelled at Karajan's meddling with the recording process, he was a steadfast conservative by comparison with these results!

    The bulk of the programme offered here is from an LP release entitled "Stokowski conducts Bach - the great transcriptions". Opening with one of the longest unbroken movements of Bach, the Chaconne that has spawned other transcriptions from the likes of Brahms & Busoni, in MCH one immediately notices that the positioning of the orchestra wraps itself around the listener and - in common with film footage of this orchestra & conductor - is not how one would typically expect a modern symphony orchestra to turn out on the stage. The LSO play marvellously with tremendous range of tone and dynamic and clear affection for the general approach.

    But that is as nothing compared to the marvels of the closing pages of Wagner's Götterdämmerung re-scored by Stokowski. With this work afforded a noticeably wider dynamic range, the details that Wagner & Stokowski request of the orchestra are that bit more faithfully captured and relayed to us vividly in Dutton's restoration. Perhaps because these ears, although very sympathetic to the Bach a la Stokowski, have spent a substantial amount of time listening to Bach via the HIP school of interpretation, the rubato and moulding of Wagner's music seems more of a natural fit and carries a genuine electricity. By contrast, the Bach in the same orchestral hands is not quite as gripping as one can hear from earlier accounts in Philadelphia. One constant is a feature of intonation between sections that is lacking today; solo brass or wind lines are played ever so slightly against the strings harmonic thinking - it is certainly different from the homogeneous tuning favoured today. Although it is initially distracting, the ear quickly adjusts when the playing and conducting is so persuasive (although the likes of Wagner: Gotterdämmerung - Janowski or Wagner - Fischer are unlikely to be evicted by this account).

    As already alluded to, the tapes for this disc are in a far better state than Rachmaninov / Saint-Saëns: Piano Concertos No. 2 - Rubinstein / Ormandy and there is very little to complain about from a sonic perspective, although there are moments when a channel (although with no "active" contribution at the time) sounds like it "drops out" but these are to few to seriously worry about.

    Recommended and one can only hope for more from this master of the orchestra.

    Copyright © 2017 John Broggio and HRAudio.net
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    Last edited by Aggelos; Apr-17-2018 at 19:31.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggelos View Post
    Did you acquire the Dutton SACD release? It seems they granted your wish (from back in December 2015)
    Bach Symphonic Transcriptions

    The quadraphonic recordings of the 1970s, have been restored by Dutton on a multi-channel SACD.
    Thanks for this info. I knew I had posted about the Chaconne in the past, but had forgotten when. I don't have the Dutton and will check it out.

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    This is the only thing I was able to discover in relations to the Bach-Leibowitz Toccata and Fugue orchestral transcription.
    https://www.eamdc.com/composers/rene...ue-in-d-minor/
    It was performed by Radio-Symphony Orchestra Frankfurt on Saturday 3rd November 1984, conducted by Cristobal Halffter.
    The German city Kassel is home to the so-called Bachfest (the Bach Festival) and in 1984 they held a "Bach in the 20th Century" series of concerts and music events.











    Leibowitz did record his orchestration for Passacaglia and Fuge BWV 582



    "The Leibowitz-arranged Bach Passacaglia is just mesmerizing! Bach himself would approve with delight; you know Rene's touch, especially with older music (Beethoven and earlier) He doesn't overdo anything. In the case of the Bach, each phrasing and grouping has definite purpose; they have Rene's touch all over them, but again they are really unchanged in any real technical way from Bach's original composition. It is seemingly as the great work was originally composed. But yet Rene L. has somehow magically rendered this piece more accessible in a modern kind of way. It's one of Leibowitz's supreme talents. Contemporary people living in these modern times would have no problem relating to it at all. This is indeed something special. (Rene L. is so terribly underrated, it is almost a crime. We need more recordings!) As the yrs. go by, this is more and more the way I often like to hear this kind of music. I personally think the Bach arrangements are better than his "Night on Bare Mountain" and that Is hard to top. Rather than blather on my opinions any further, I think I'll quote you something better and far more informed, Charles Gherhardt: 'Few compositions invite restatement and expansion as this one does. Rene Leibowitz was preceded in this tempting and exciting role of arranger by Esker, Goedicke, Stock, Respighi and Stokowski. What the arranger has done here is to use and maintain the effect of two separate orchestras. They are divided in space, but there is of course complete contact and integration between them. The arrangement is one more tribute to the diverse genius of Bach.'

    Well, both recording and performance is full, and rich, and simply just wonderful, as you can imagine two orchestras conducted in complete control with a master at the helm would be, especially given the RCA / Wilkinson Royal sonic treatment. And I love the double timpani whacks at the ending!"
    -Ralph Harris

    http://www.musiques-regenerees.fr/Gh...Leibowitz.html



    ================================================== ====================



    https://www.pristineclassical.com/pr...da16267e&_ss=r

    http://www.musicweb-international.co...v2_PASC532.htm

    The present program is the second devoted to the transcriptions and compositions of Lucien Cailliet (1891 – 1985), clarinetist of the Philadelphia Orchestra during the Stokowski era, and later teacher and film music orchestrator. For more on his biography, including the controversy surrounding the role he played in Stokowski’s transcriptions, the reader is referred to our first volume (PASC 444).

    In Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor, Cailliet seems intent on distancing himself from the famous Stokowski version, at a couple points adding a brass counterpoint over the arpeggios of the lower strings. The recording dates from Cailliet’s Hollywood days, and comes from the soundtrack of a 1946 nature film short which presents a day in Bryce Canyon, Utah. Janssen’s orchestra plays with vigor, although with an occasionally scrappy ensemble that would never be confused with Stokowski’s Philadelphians.

    The orchestra in the following track, however, might well be confused with the Philadelphia – appropriately so, as they were the same ensemble playing under a nom-de-disque. Charles O’Connell was a conductor, arranger and organist in addition to being Victor’s Classical A&R Director, and led the Philadelphia Orchestra on some of its 1936 cross-county tour dates. Cailliet here expands the strings-and-continuo of Bach’s original to include winds and brass.

    Eugene Ormandy was a champion of Cailliet’s transcriptions even while he was still leading the Minneapolis Symphony. The third selection was Cailliet’s first credit in the recording logs as an orchestrator, even though the side remained unissued until the LP era. Ormandy continued his efforts on his behalf in Philadelphia, recording several of his arrangements and commissioning Cailliet’s orchestration of Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. The Prelude and Fugue in B minor was probably recorded to follow up Ormandy’s recording of Cailliet’s transcription of Bach’s Prelude and Fugue in F minor (one Volume 1), but it, too, was unpublished on 78 rpm.

    The next two transcriptions feature works by Bach’s contemporaries. Buxtehude’s Organ Passacaglia in D minor has often been cited as an inspiration for Bach’s Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor. Cailliet emphasizes the connection by adding a preface stating the unadorned bass line. And at a time when Vivaldi was known almost exclusively for his Concerto Grosso in D minor in various modern arrangements, Cailliet sought to widen the composer’s renown with a full-orchestra version of one of his violin double concertos.

    Taking leave of the Baroque era, Cailliet’s Debussy transcription was recorded three times by Ormandy; this is his first. By contrast, Ormandy only recorded the three Rachmaninoff preludes once, on a 10-inch LP. When they were reissued as a filler on a later 12-inch disc, the Prelude in C sharp minor was omitted. (Could someone have felt it was too over-the-top?)

    Cailliet’s efforts were appreciated not only in Philadelphia. Arthur Fiedler recorded several of his works with his Boston “Pops”, including the famous Tchaikovsky song heard here and his “Pop! Goes the Weasel” Variations (on Volume 1). Our program ends with Fiedler’s recording of another of Cailliet’s fantasies on a well-known tune, “Happy Birthday to You”, a work which also inspired Stravinsky to write his Greeting Prelude.
    Last edited by Aggelos; May-25-2020 at 14:33.

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    I love Bach transcribed for big orchestra! I love Bach in any form. One of my favorites is the Fantasy and a Fugue in c-minor transcribed by Elgar.

  23. Likes Aggelos, pianozach liked this post
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