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Thread: Meeting Classical Artists vs. Pop Artists

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Default Meeting Classical Artists vs. Pop Artists

    The technical abilities of Classical and Jazz artists is far superior, yet I feel far more comfortable meeting them than past pop acts I have and still enjoy from time to time.

    Anyone have similar feelings and have insight into why this is a phenomena? Why don't I get as star struck by Classical and Jazz Artists?

    (once Miles went electric, he became a pop artist I would've been intimidated by, but when he was doing modal jazz and be-bop I would've been fine with it).
    Last edited by Captainnumber36; Jul-25-2019 at 14:25.

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Maybe, for me, it has something to do with their lack of willingness to be questioned as much? Or engage in critical discussion about their performance if it was after a show?

    Something along those lines, I think!

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    Senior Member NLAdriaan's Avatar
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    Classical and Jazz musicians generally have less smugness and are more approachable than Pop artists.

    Maybe the average size and hysteria of the audience and the presence of Security Gorillas has to do with it? Plus I don't think Jazz and Classical musicians are subject to psychotic fans that are ready to eat their object of admiration alive. A major popstar can't walk on the streets anymore. A major jazz or classical soloist or conductor won't even be recognized. But of course it is all speculation.

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NLAdriaan View Post
    Classical and Jazz musicians generally have less smugness and are more approachable than Pop artists.

    Maybe the average size and hysteria of the audience and the presence of Security Gorillas has to do with it? Plus I don't think Jazz and Classical musicians are subject to psychotic fans that are ready to eat their object of admiration alive. A major popstar can't walk on the streets anymore. A major jazz or classical soloist or conductor won't even be recognized. But of course it is all speculation.
    Good points.

    - Classical and Jazz Artists are less smug generally.
    - Classical and Jazz Artists still play to large audiences though (see Carnigie Hall and other major halls around the world).
    - Fans are more civilized, certainly in general in Jazz and Classical which helps not feed the Artists ego.


    I think also, Classical and Jazz Artists care more about their Art in general compared to their peers.

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    Moderator Art Rock's Avatar
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    The closest I came to meeting either was walking in a park near Chicago when James Levine crossed my road. I had absolutely no desire to talk to him (I was going to a recital of him accompanying the lovely Dawn Upshaw that evening by the way).

    I did meet Zhao Wou Ki in Paris, at the time one of the most famous living painters (he passed away a few years ago). However, understandably, my wife did the talking (being Chinese and a professional artist herself).

    Would I be starstruck to meet a famous classical musician or pop/rock artist? I doubt it. But I also doubt whether there would be interest from either side in a conversation.

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Rock View Post
    The closest I came to meeting either was walking in a park near Chicago when James Levine crossed my road. I had absolutely no desire to talk to him (I was going to a recital of him accompanying the lovely Dawn Upshaw that evening by the way).

    I did meet Zhao Wou Ki in Paris, at the time one of the most famous living painters (he passed away a few years ago). However, understandably, my wife did the talking (being Chinese and a professional artist herself).

    Would I be starstruck to meet a famous classical musician or pop/rock artist? I doubt it. But I also doubt whether there would be interest from either side in a conversation.
    I just googled his work, fantastic!

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    Senior Member mbhaub's Avatar
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    I've met many classical artists and have found them all nice people (well, one conductor wasn't so friendly). That's because they started out like most musicians and know the road ahead. And maybe they realize how small the classical world is and it's important to treat the customers right. Klaus Tennstedt invited me into his dressing room for a Heineken! I spent hours having lunches, drinks and walks with Michael Ponti. Countless classical musicians - so many great memories. But I've been around a lot of pop musicians, too. For a lot of them, I think the extreme wealth and adulation goes to their heads and they somehow think they're better than the peons. Johnny Cash was sure that way. On the other hand, Billy Joel, Donny Osmond, and Glen Campbell were just terrific. I'm not one to being starstruck - they're just people, albeit very talented. The one time I did find myself speechless was when I was standing next to Carlo Maria Giulini.

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbhaub View Post
    I've met many classical artists and have found them all nice people (well, one conductor wasn't so friendly). That's because they started out like most musicians and know the road ahead. And maybe they realize how small the classical world is and it's important to treat the customers right. Klaus Tennstedt invited me into his dressing room for a Heineken! I spent hours having lunches, drinks and walks with Michael Ponti. Countless classical musicians - so many great memories. But I've been around a lot of pop musicians, too. For a lot of them, I think the extreme wealth and adulation goes to their heads and they somehow think they're better than the peons. Johnny Cash was sure that way. On the other hand, Billy Joel, Donny Osmond, and Glen Campbell were just terrific. I'm not one to being starstruck - they're just people, albeit very talented. The one time I did find myself speechless was when I was standing next to Carlo Maria Giulini.
    Good post showing the grey area in the discussion!

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    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captainnumber36 View Post
    (once Miles went electric, he became a pop artist I would've been intimidated by, but when he was doing modal jazz and be-bop I would've been fine with it).
    this is one of the weirdest things I've ever read.
    What time is the next swan?

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by norman bates View Post
    this is one of the weirdest things I've ever read.
    I don't think it's that strange, his personality and especially look changed quite dramatically, not to mention his celebrity sky-rocketed.
    Last edited by Captainnumber36; Jul-26-2019 at 07:51.

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    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captainnumber36 View Post
    I don't think it's that strange, his personality and especially look changed quite dramatically, not to mention his celebrity sky-rocketed.
    I don't know if his personality changed onestly (and notoriously he's never been the nicest man in the world to put it mildly), but besides that I feel strange even the fact that you said that after he went electric he become a pop artist, since especially the albums he did in the early seventies were anything but pop, but actually probably the least accessible music he ever did in all his career. Stuff that was extremely dense, layered, often ominous and dark. I know that "pop" can be intended in different ways and in a sense I can understand how someone could see the fact that he was incorporating rock and funk elemenents in his music as a fact that he was going "pop", but still the idea that someone could think to something like Pharoah's dance as "pop" is almost surreal for me.
    Last edited by norman bates; Jul-26-2019 at 08:40.
    What time is the next swan?

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    Senior Member haydnguy's Avatar
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    I think that pop musicians don't grow musically once they've hit the big time. They continue to churn out the same stuff time after time. Most performers in classical music will vary their playing and will release new things once they've gone through the standard repertoire. (At least on recordings.)

    As far as friendliness goes, I read in an article about 10 years ago that Lang Lang was very snobbish to his fans where Evgeny Kissin signed autographs and was very friendly. I would go see Kissin before Lang Lang, plus I like his performing better.

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    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    I have no interest at all in meeting any famous artist. Why should I? Their art talks to me and that is enough. Of course, knowing an artist - whether famous or not - quite well might be a very different experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by Captainnumber36 View Post
    (once Miles went electric, he became a pop artist I would've been intimidated by, but when he was doing modal jazz and be-bop I would've been fine with it).
    I don't think Miles became a pop musician when he went electric. He continued his ground breaking path and produced a number of seminal jazz albums (just as he had done before he went electric).

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    Senior Member NLAdriaan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by haydnguy View Post
    I think that pop musicians don't grow musically once they've hit the big time. They continue to churn out the same stuff time after time. Most performers in classical music will vary their playing and will release new things once they've gone through the standard repertoire. (At least on recordings.)
    Well, Pop musicians generally play their own music, where classical musicians mainly reproduce 100+ year old music time after time.

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by norman bates View Post
    I don't know if his personality changed onestly (and notoriously he's never been the nicest man in the world to put it mildly), but besides that I feel strange even the fact that you said that after he went electric he become a pop artist, since especially the albums he did in the early seventies were anything but pop, but actually probably the least accessible music he ever did in all his career. Stuff that was extremely dense, layered, often ominous and dark. I know that "pop" can be intended in different ways and in a sense I can understand how someone could see the fact that he was incorporating rock and funk elemenents in his music as a fact that he was going "pop", but still the idea that someone could think to something like Pharoah's dance as "pop" is almost surreal for me.
    You already understand where I am coming from. It is the fact he incorporated those rock and funk elements that made him "poppier" for the time being. And certainly, he became much more popular.

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