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Thread: Recent discoveries in archeaology

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    Senior Member joen_cph's Avatar
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    Default Recent discoveries in archaeology

    I thought it could be nice with a thread on this website dealing with recent archaeological findings around the globe, as reported by the press etc. - lots of stuff is happening due to increased scientific and technological abilities.

    And the results in this field can be truly stunning ...

    .................................................. ..............................................

    I'll start with these two:

    "Uidentified Ship":
    "A 500-Year-Old Shipwreck Has Turned Up Perfectly Intact on Bottom of The Baltic Sea":

    Local press here in Denmark says that the ship is likely of Danish origins - based on some of the identified design.
    https://www.sciencealert.com/a-myste...the-baltic-sea

    .................................................. .................................................. ................................

    However: probably biggest news recently -
    "Motza":
    "A "Game-Changing" 10,000-Year-Old Neolithic City Has Been Unearthed Near Jerusalem"

    This find apparently means that the picture of the level of civilization in Neolithic cultures must be revised, since the town seems to be good deal more refined than say Catalhöyük.
    https://www.sciencealert.com/huge-pr...s-of-jerusalem
    Last edited by joen_cph; Aug-01-2019 at 20:33.

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    Senior Member TxllxT's Avatar
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    Doggerland in the North Sea:
    https://www.theguardian.com/science/...-the-stone-age

    Also in the North Sea: recently a natural catastrophe happened with a containerschip loosing lots of containers during a storm.
    https://www.dutchnews.nl/news/2019/0...-century-ship/
    A 16th century ship was discovered.
    All we like sheep

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    Senior Member Bwv 1080's Avatar
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    The biggest unexplored archaeological site is the tomb of the first Qin Emperor. The Chinese gov knows exactly where it is, but have yet to try to open it. The rumored lake of pure mercury is one potential issue to deal with

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/a...y/emperor-qin/

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    Quote Originally Posted by TxllxT View Post
    Doggerland in the North Sea:
    https://www.theguardian.com/science/...-the-stone-age

    Also in the North Sea: recently a natural catastrophe happened with a containerschip loosing lots of containers during a storm.
    https://www.dutchnews.nl/news/2019/0...-century-ship/
    A 16th century ship was discovered.
    Doggerland: extremely interesting. Not mentioned in the article, but imagine they find burried stone structures or the like, for example.
    Last edited by joen_cph; Aug-01-2019 at 21:33.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bwv 1080 View Post
    The biggest unexplored archaeological site is the tomb of the first Qin Emperor. The Chinese gov knows exactly where it is, but have yet to try to open it. The rumored lake of pure mercury is one potential issue to deal with

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/a...y/emperor-qin/
    Yes, there are some fine documentaries about this. As it is said about the Chinese, "they sew with a long thread", meaning that their patience can be manifest, and add to this respect and reverence for the forefathers ... haven't heard of any plans to open the site. Maybe we'll hear more.

    As regards Pompeii for example, I've heard that about about 1/3 is left more or less untouched, but the main reason, as I understand it, is that they want to reserve it for more sophisticated excavation techniques of the future. Whereas with the Chinese site, other factors seem to play a role too, though the NG article points to the complex structures inside. Some would think that a drone was an option ...
    Last edited by joen_cph; Aug-01-2019 at 21:35.

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    Czech archaeologists discover 7,000-year-old trading station
    https://www.radio.cz/en/section/news...rading-station
    there are more details on czech news, but I do not find it that interesting. A couple of tools from that period.

    For me the most interesting stuff in archeology are the ancient megalithic structures, because they are the most mysterious
    Ancient Megaliths So Puzzling Their Precision, Origin and Meaning Are Still Unknown

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    Robot exploration of the HMS Terror, well preserved in arctic waters


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    Coming in the October 2019 issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science - no, knives fashioned from frozen fecal matter do not, in fact, work!
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...52409X19305371

    Highlights from the article:
    •An ethnographic account states an Inuit man made a knife from his own frozen feces.
    •We experimentally tested knives manufactured from frozen human feces.
    •Knives manufactured from frozen human feces do not work.
    So please - I know we are trying to be as resourceful and carbon neutral as possible, but please don't try to cut your steak with your own sh**!

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    Senior Member Bwv 1080's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrMike View Post
    Coming in the October 2019 issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science - no, knives fashioned from frozen fecal matter do not, in fact, work!
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...52409X19305371

    Highlights from the article:


    So please - I know we are trying to be as resourceful and carbon neutral as possible, but please don't try to cut your steak with your own sh**!
    But will it cut that yellow snow?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bwv 1080 View Post
    But will it cut that yellow snow?
    That part is unclear, but it will certainly season as it cuts! I pity the poor grad students who had to do those experiments. I've read some pretty sh**ty scientific papers before, but this one is truly the sh**!

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrMike View Post
    Coming in the October 2019 issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science - no, knives fashioned from frozen fecal matter do not, in fact, work!
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...52409X19305371

    Highlights from the article:


    So please - I know we are trying to be as resourceful and carbon neutral as possible, but please don't try to cut your steak with your own sh**!
    From the Materials and Methods section:
    In order to procure the necessary raw materials for knife production, one of us (M.I.E.) went on a diet with high protein and fatty acids, which is consistent with an arctic diet, for eight days (Binford, 2012; Fumagalli et al., 2015) (Table S1). The Inuit do not only eat meat from maritime and terrestrial animals (Arendt, 2010; Zutter, 2009), and there were three instances during the eight-day diet that M.I.E. ate fruit, vegetables, or carbohydrates (Table S1).

    Raw material collection did not begin until day four, and then proceeded regularly for the next five days (Table S1). Fecal samples were formed into knives using ceramic molds, “knife molds” (Figs. S1–S2), or molded by hand, “hand-shaped knives” (Fig. S3). All fecal samples were stored at −20 °C until the experiments began.
    Edit: you have to go to the supplemental data to actually see any of the pictures. They note that their fecal knives are incapable of cutting any kind of animal skin, but rather tend to leave brown streaks!!!!!
    Last edited by DrMike; Sep-16-2019 at 22:50.

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    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrMike View Post
    ...So please - I know we are trying to be as resourceful and carbon neutral as possible, but please don't try to cut your steak with your own sh**!
    Or somebody else's, for that matter.


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    One of the finds that come to my mind was the Skeleton of King Richard III in Leicester. Then there was controversy about where he should have been laid to rest. York because he was a Yorkist or Leicester where he wad killed in the Battle of Bosworth. Leicester won.

    Incidentally, studying an on-line course about King Richard III and medieval life. Very interesting

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    Quote Originally Posted by Judith View Post
    One of the finds that come to my mind was the Skeleton of King Richard III in Leicester. Then there was controversy about where he should have been laid to rest. York because he was a Yorkist or Leicester where he wad killed in the Battle of Bosworth. Leicester won.

    Incidentally, studying an on-line course about King Richard III and medieval life. Very interesting
    It's interesting how the English retire regal names when the last bearer or bearers turn out to be duds or otherwise thought cruel, incompetent, inadequate. Thus "We" have dropped John, Richard, Henry, James, and Edward, and are carrying on with Charles, William, and George. Time for some fresh names? Suggestions?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange Magic View Post
    It's interesting how the English retire regal names when the last bearer or bearers turn out to be duds or otherwise thought cruel, incompetent, inadequate. Thus "We" have dropped John, Richard, Henry, James, and Edward, and are carrying on with Charles, William, and George. Time for some fresh names? Suggestions?
    There are questions on whether King Richard III was so bad after all. Yes, two skeletons were found in Tower of London" but not definite that they were the two Princes!

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