View Poll Results: Czech or Hungarian composers?

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  • Czech

    8 57.14%
  • Hungarian

    6 42.86%
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Thread: Czech vs Hungarian composers

  1. #1
    Senior Member Gallus's Avatar
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    Default Czech vs Hungarian composers

    Zelenka, Smetana, Dvorak, Janacek, Martinu...
    or
    Liszt, Bartok, Ligeti, Kodaly, Dohnanyi?

    Which do you prefer listening to?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bulldog's Avatar
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    I'll go with the Czech composers by a small margin. If I was deeply into Liszt, which I am not, the Hungarian composers would take first place.

  3. #3
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I enjoy some Janacek and Martinu, and a few Dvorak symphonies. But Bartok, and Ligeti are giants to my ears. And I'm a fan of Laszlo Lajtha as well. But who listens by country anyway? Music has no borders.
    Short-term thinkers are rewarded with reelection, while those who dare to take seriously our responsibility to future generations commonly find themselves out of office.

    - Marcia Bjornerud, Geologist

  4. #4
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    I'm doing a deep dive into Hungarian music right now, but the Czechs have a slight edge. I've read that, while Liszt was Hungarian, he couldn't speak a lick of Magyar. Was he a Hungarian composer or a composer who happened to be Hungarian?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Brahmsian Colors's Avatar
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    The beauty and grandeur of Dvorak and Smetana's music take the prize for me.

  6. #6
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
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    Myslivecek, Kozeluch, Dussek were all Czech
    Mahler was born in Bohemia

  7. #7
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hammeredklavier View Post
    Myslivecek, Kozeluch, Dussek were all Czech
    Negatory on that. "Bohemia is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic. In a broader meaning, Bohemia sometimes refers to the entire Czech territory, including Moravia and Czech Silesia, especially in a historical context, such as the Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Bohemian kings."
    Last edited by KenOC; Aug-16-2019 at 05:07.


  8. #8
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    As much as I enjoy the music of Liszt, Dohnanyi, Bartok, Kodaly, and Lajtha, I have to go with the Czechs. Dvorak is one of my favorite composers of all time, and Janacek, Martinu, and Suk rank pretty high up there for me as well. I also greatly enjoy the music of Smetana, Novak, and Kabelac. But, as starthrower says, music has no borders!

  9. #9
    Senior Member joen_cph's Avatar
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    Not an obvious choice for me.

    I'd rather not be without the freshness of Martinu and Janacek, yet the same freshness is also apparent in Ligeti and Bartok ... so very difficult. And Liszt versus Dvorak, difficult too, but I'd lean towards Liszt, a bigger number of works I really like.
    Last edited by joen_cph; Aug-16-2019 at 07:30.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Negatory on that. "Bohemia is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic. In a broader meaning, Bohemia sometimes refers to the entire Czech territory, including Moravia and Czech Silesia, especially in a historical context, such as the Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Bohemian kings."
    Kingdom of Bohemia was a kingdom in the western part and Margraviate of Moraviain the eastern part and together they were known as Czech Lands
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czech_lands
    first the Celts were living there, then during the migration period first the germanic tribes and later the slavic tribes migrated there and these 3 ethnic groups intermingled to form Czechs

    "from genetic aspect over 35% of Czech males have haplogroup R1b, which is very common in Western Europe among Germanic and Celtic nations, but rare among Slavic nations and a high frequency of mutation of the G551D gene CFTR is found in Czech Republic, Austria, and among the Celtic nations: Wales, Scotland, Cornwall, Ireland and Brittany. And there is also quit high frequency of people with red hair. Bohemia, the biggest region in Czech republic got name after Boii - Celtic tribe that lived there before Germanic and Slavic tribes arrived and survived until today by mixing with new comers"

  11. #11
    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Czech and it's not even close.
    Allüberall und ewig blauen licht die Fernen! Ewig ... ewig ...

  12. #12
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Various composers from both countries wrote music based on national folk dances and songs and I enjoy them all, but there is something particularly alluring and hotblooded about those pulsating Magyar rhythms which propelled Bartók's music so often (even though he often used folk tunes from neighbouring countries). One name which I would include in a pantheon of Czech greats is Erwin Schulhoff, even though there was nothing discernibly Czech-like about his music.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

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