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Thread: Der Freischutz

  1. #46
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Just want to say that this opera is absolutely glorious, one of my top 10 for sure. The blend of naive folksiness and dark, opulent Romanticism is absolutely contagious. One of the best overtures in opera, great orchestration, complex and likable characters, an engaging fantasical plot, and some truly ravishing arias. It reminds me somewhat of a Grimm or Andersen fairy tale. I’ve only heard the Keilberth, but I have no inclination to hear the generally-recommended Kleiber since Janowitz and Schreier normally don’t float my boat. I definitely prefer it to Fidelio and Magic Flute among pre-Wagner German operas.
    Last edited by Allegro Con Brio; Jul-21-2021 at 03:53.
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  3. #47
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    Schreier is not ideal; I am not even too fond of Adam's Kaspar. The stars of the Kleiber are Janowitz and Kleiber and maybe the Staatskapelle.
    I don't prefer it vs. Flute and Fidelio. Freischütz is indebted to both, I believe. The great ensembles at the ends of the first act of Fidelio (with the prisoners returning to their dungeons) and Freischütz (O diese Sonne) seem similar and Florestan's dungeon scene has often been mentioned as having a similarly dark romantic tone (although it is of course rather different from the Wolf's glen).

    But Freischütz is certainly a huge step towards both Romanticism and a specifically German opera. I think it does not travel so well and is far more popular in German speaking countries.
    Last edited by Kreisler jr; Jul-21-2021 at 19:26.

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