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Thread: Protest Music

  1. #31
    Senior Member Victor Redseal's Avatar
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    We all know that the nuclear threat ended after Mr. Reagan implored Mr. Gorbachev to "tear down this wall." Voila! The wall came down, the nukes were disarmed and the world was suddenly safe! Except, of course, nothing like this happened. The threat of nuclear annihilation is as real now as it ever was. Not only have the nuclear arsenals not been shut down, the former Soviet Union does not even know where all its arsenal went! Some were stolen and some appear to have secretly auctioned off to the highest bidder. For example, the nuclear suitcase bombs--red clay, as it is known--have simply vanished. We have no idea who may have them now and what they plan to do with them. The US govt seems to believe that the Arabs lack the money and know-how to procure and arm the red clay but I think Saudi oil money COULD buy a few as well as the cooperation of people who know exactly how to use them. These could be placed in bus terminals, airports, sports stadiums, even a damn YMCA. Blow up one city and then send a message: "We have several more of these in different cities, you'll never find them all in time, so here is a list of our demands..." What are we going to do at that point?



    Govts have always tried to play down the severity of such a war to utter and comical absurdity. In one propaganda reel from the fifties on how to best protect oneself in the event of an attack, it suggested holding up a newspaper to shield one's face and eyes. These bombs unleash the most horrendous and hideous destruction ever witnessed by the human race including melting steel structures and disintegrating houses in a flash but holding up a stupid newspaper is going to protect you. If only the unfortunates at Hiroshima and Nagasaki had known!



    If a nuclear war started with Russia, according to Princeton's computer models, 91.5 million people would die the first phase including 2.6 million in a 3-hour attack that would effectively destroy Europe followed by a 45-minute retaliation that would kill 3.4 million. This would be followed by a period where NATO and Russia (and we won't assume China or North Korea would be joining them) would start taking out each other's big cities to prevent the other side from being able to recuperate and regroup. During this stage of the war, New York would be destroyed along with about 85 million people.



    Conditions on the ground would be horrific. These bombs would be far more powerful than Hiroshima or Nagasaki. For one thing, we tend to prefer thermonuclear bombs which are far more powerful than fission bombs producing yields of several hundred kilotons compared to the 12-15 kilotons for the Little Boy detonated over Hiroshima (and less than 2% of the plutonium used actually fissioned). In a thermonuclear explosion, there is a primary explosion: chemical explosives ignite around a hollow sphere of Plutonium-239. The hollow ball is called "the pit." As the pit implodes, it is tremendously compressed. When the pit becomes dense enough for a fission chain reaction (i.e. when it reaches supercriticality), a neutron generator injects neutrons into the pit as it compresses. This then kicks off the chain reaction and the resulting explosion generates tremendous heat and pressure that kicks off the secondary explosion which is a fusion detonation where two atoms are fused which, in turn, releases a tremendous amount of energy. The fusion fuel is a solid compound of lithium and deuterium and called, appropriately enough, lithium deuteride. This fuel undergoes fusion through a kind of "wick" of plutonium-239 or uranium-235 that is embedded inside it. The primary explosion compresses the fuel which compresses the wick inside and causes it to undergo fission and this explosion drives the atoms of the compressed fuel back outward which basically just slams the atoms of the fuel together producing a massive fusion detonation. The fuel is wrapped in a uranium shell and the explosion causes this shell to undergo fission and this fission explosion accounts for about half the total yield of the bomb. It is a horrendous explosion!



    Part of the problem with nuclear war isn't even the prospect of war itself. The problem is that we could blow ourselves up or start a war by mistake. An accident or mishap is all it takes. A Titan ICBM in its silo in Kansas sprang a leak and dumped its rocket fuel into the silo, the missile exploded but fortunately, the bombs were not armed. If they had been, we would have destroyed the Breadbasket Midwest. In 1961, a B-52 carrying two 4-megaton thermonuclear bombs, crashed near Eureka, North Carolina. Each bomb had more explosive power than all munitions ever detonated in the history of the human race combined! Only one of the failsafes worked. It was a low-voltage switch that prevented arming the bombs. Had this failsafe failed like the rest of them, much of the eastern seaboard would be a gulf! Our maps would look very different today.

    When you hear the punk tunes calling a nuclear war "a mass crematorium" that's a pretty good analogy. The heat generated in the bombs are hotter than the surface of the sun. This heat bursts out of the bomb and sets everything on fire. Anything not blown apart by the enormous shock wave, will be burned, seared or melted in the intense heat. The firecloud will generate tremendous winds in excess of 100 mph which is higher than hurricane force and the temperatures of these winds will be on the order of 100 degrees celsius--enough to boil water. Anyone caught in those winds will die. There is nothing they could do. The blast will blow a huge hole in the ground and fling all the dirt, dust and rocks in the air. All of it would be severely irradiated. The heavier pieces of debris would rain back down first. But the light dusts would be spread by the violent winds and blown around for hundreds of miles. This dust is so irradiated that if you collect up one ounce and then spread it uniformly over a square mile, you could march thousands of people through it for years 24/7 and all of them would receive lethal doses of radiation.

    If you hide in a cellar or bomb shelter you could survive the explosion as long as you are in the center of the shelter. If you are leaning on the walls or standing close to them, you would be killed when the shock wave hits because the walls will buck so violently that it would like getting hit by a Mack truck doing 80 mph. Then, course, you can't come out. The surface would be so irradiated that you would get acute radiation sickness very quickly and die an agonizing death. Untold millions, even billions would die from radiation in the aftermath. If you survive that, you get to enjoy the thrill of stepping out a shower, running a brush or comb through your hair and watch it all come off in the bristles while you stare at the mirror in amazement at the long swath of bare scalp you just exposed on your head. Ask the Japanese survivors how fun that is.



    We need an anti-bomb/anti-nuke protest movement now more than ever before. We have a president who thinks we should try detonating nuclear bombs in approaching hurricanes in hopes of turning them back. Now is not the time to be silent.

    BTW, the secondary fusion cores on the bombs in that B-52 that crashed in North Carolina in '61 were NEVER found! They are still buried somewhere under the North Carolina soil.
    Last edited by Victor Redseal; Sep-21-2019 at 01:45.
    "God," asked Adam, "why did you make Eve so beautiful?"
    And He replied, "So that you could love her."
    "But God," asked Adam, "why did you make her so stupid?"
    And He replied, "So that she could love you."

  2. #32
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
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    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Victor Redseal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggart View Post
    This was an important album for me. My brother had it. He bought it right after it came out when most people were ignoring it because of Beatlemania. He was just entering high school and I was 6, I think. He became an S&G fanatic and would sit in his room for hours learning all the chords and fingerings. Over the years, he would perform the songs for people as he grew more socially conscious and the reality that the draft was awaiting him upon graduation.

    I heard my parents talk about the draft a lot and I saw guys on TV getting killed or being dragged by their buddies through rice paddies under heavy gunfire while he's trailing blood and screaming in pain at the top of his lungs, "My fking leg, watch my fking leg!" I loved "Bleecker Street" although I was too young to even know where Bleecker Street was. But the song "He Was My Brother" used to make me cry. I didn't know at the time that it was about the Goodman-Chaney-Schwerner murders in Mississippi. It made me think instead about my brother being drafted and sent to Vietnam and dying there. The thought of it was unbearable and the thought of how my parents would take it was even more unbearable. And then I would realize that there were already many parents who were crying over their lost sons and kids my age crying over their dead older brothers that they loved as much as I loved mine and how much they would miss him. They had to live with what I only feared might happen but might happen soon. Like watching a fatal car wreck in agonizing slow motion. The emotional impact of it would be too much for me and I would lock myself in the bathroom and cry. Then I would splash water on my face and pretend like I was just washing up.

    My brother managed to stay out of the draft although he had a draft card. He got college deferments. He said had it not been for the draft, he probably never would have stayed in college where he eventually got a degree in microbiology and became a professor and then an administrator. He's retired now. When I taught myself the guitar, my brother was surprised I had become so good because I was actually a drummer at the time and he would have me perform at shows with him. We still perform together once in a blue moon. But I think of everything we've done down through the years, the decades, and wonder what it would have been like had he been dead and gone all that time.

    He knows every S&G song on guitar--every note on every song. You close your eyes and you'd really think it was Paul Simon playing because it's so perfect. I think the only S&G I taught myself was "April Come She Will." I always wanted to learn "The Dangling Conversation" but I never got around to it--beautiful poetry set to beautiful music, each of which could have stood by itself. I'm kind of an authority on the music of S&G because my brother played them all so incessantly.

    So I would say that "Wednesday Morning, 3 AM" is the original moment of my social outlook on life. The music that kicked it all off for me. Every time I read about some injustice that occurred somewhere, I would think about a song from that album. And I would feel sadness, rage and outrage and that outrage has never gone away. I still carry it. But I think it's helped me keep a straight head about what really matters. I don't care what TV shows are going to get cancelled or what movie has all the critics raving or what celebrity couple is breaking up. This country is splitting up families and putting kids in cages without due process or even basic sanitation. I want filthy fkr Trump swinging by his balls. That's what matters most to me.
    "God," asked Adam, "why did you make Eve so beautiful?"
    And He replied, "So that you could love her."
    "But God," asked Adam, "why did you make her so stupid?"
    And He replied, "So that she could love you."

  4. #34
    Senior Member joen_cph's Avatar
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    The Savage Rose is one of the best bands we've had here in my country, founded in the late 60s and still active.
    Members include the fabulous main vocalist Annisette and relatives of the classical composer H.D.Koppel; one of the members, Thomas Koppel, originally a classical pianist, has however died.
    Lyrics became increasingly political and they often still tend to be so. The musical style has been extremely varied, and much more experimental than just these examples show.

    The Shoeshine Boy is Dead (1973)



    Inuit Nunat (a song about lost Greenlandish identity)(1973)



    Fløjten bag Muren (about separation and longing for freedom, from an album with politically charged folk songs from around the world. 1989)



    Homeless (2017; the singer is now 69 years old)



    List of their main albums
    https://www.flashlyrics.com/lyrics/the-savage-rose

    1968 Television presentation, quite hippie/punk-ish
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CODgz6xYJYs
    Last edited by joen_cph; Sep-21-2019 at 21:12.

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  6. #35
    Senior Member Kjetil Heggelund's Avatar
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    I sometimes "revolt" against everything with some noisy black metal \m/ At a concert I went to, I saw a guy whose back of jacket said (among other things) ANTI-HUMAN. Wow!

  7. #36
    Senior Member Victor Redseal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kjetil Heggelund View Post
    I sometimes "revolt" against everything with some noisy black metal \m/ At a concert I went to, I saw a guy whose back of jacket said (among other things) ANTI-HUMAN. Wow!
    I see humans as just another life-form no better or worse than any other but too smart for our own good. Our capacity to change the world was outstripped by our urge to conquer it and dominate it. What I hate is when some jerk tries to tell me that human life is sacred and this crap. And that's all it is--crap. Abortion, for example, may be unfortunate but to be against it because your religion says it (even when it really doesn't) is just stupid, sanctimonious garbage that interferes with the natural order and disrespects the world.

    I think it is acceptable to hunt for food as long as animals are not hunted to extinction but our overpopulated numbers have made it necessary to impose rules and restrictions on hunting to prevent depleting animal stocks. There are too many humans. We don't need this many people. However, that doesn't make me anti-human. I wouldn't go around culling humans indifferently saying it has to be done because who would I be to decide who gets culled and who doesn't?

    Likewise, I'm not indifferent to human suffering. I don't want to see any animal suffer and since humans are animals why should I make an exception for us? I just don't think we are intrinsically worth more than other animals. In a biosphere, we all are links in a chain, we all serve a purpose but human numbers are upsetting the balance and a mass die-off is necessary but I don't believe we should wipe each other out over it. Nature has a way of taking care of those problems and it's happening. Use up the resources? Then die. Problem solved. If that sounds cold-blooded, it's not. It's what is happening and there is nothing we can do about it. If people don't like that choice then DO something about it. Don't just throw your fking religion at me. That's just cheap, lazy and cynical. Not to mention utter hypocrisy. If you have a solution then offer it.

    If we humans are so great then we should be doing a lot better than this.

    "God," asked Adam, "why did you make Eve so beautiful?"
    And He replied, "So that you could love her."
    "But God," asked Adam, "why did you make her so stupid?"
    And He replied, "So that she could love you."

  8. #37
    Senior Member Serge's Avatar
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    Zere Asylbek / Зере - Сүйүнчү
    When I hear John Cage’s 4’33”, I reach for my earplugs.

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