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Thread: Favorite Schubert pianists?

  1. #31
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I listened to a bunch of pianists playing the D959 including Kempff, Brendel, Uchida, Zacharias, Arrau, Badura-Skoda, Pollini, Zimerman, and Lupu. The only one I really didn't like is Pollini. Lousy piano sound with too much pedal. I wasn't crazy about Zimerman either. Not much poetry in his playing. Most of the others sounded quite similar with only Arrau really standing apart with his dark, thick sound. And slight differences in phrasing from a couple of the others like Lupu. If I were to buy a set I'd probably get the Kempff, Skoda, or Uchida.
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  2. #32
    Senior Member Caryatid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starthrower View Post
    I listened to a bunch of pianists playing the D959 including Kempff, Brendel, Uchida, Zacharias, Arrau, Badura-Skoda, Pollini, Zimerman, and Lupu. The only one I really didn't like is Pollini. Lousy piano sound with too much pedal. I wasn't crazy about Zimerman either. Not much poetry in his playing. Most of the others sounded quite similar with only Arrau really standing apart with his dark, thick sound. And slight differences in phrasing from a couple of the others like Lupu. If I were to buy a set I'd probably get the Kempff, Skoda, or Uchida.
    It's true. Arrau always sounds only like himself.

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  4. #33
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    Schnabel in D959/960, Pollini in D958 (I think some may find his approach overly mannered and cold, and I do like Kempff in this sonata more except in the finale, where his tempo really is quite too slow), and I know some people don't think of the Impromptus as great music but Schnabel (on RCA) in D899 and Kempff in D935 do quite nicely.

    Also, if you're really in the mood for something left-wing: Richter's D960 on Olympia, with a 25-minute-long first movement. I do enjoy it, very much, but only sometimes. you'll see what I mean, I think!

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  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caryatid View Post
    Are there any particularly good recordings of Schubert's solo piano music on a period instrument? Last time I checked not many recordings seemed to exist, but that was years ago.
    Andras Schiff has been getting a lot of attention on ECM too, though I personally don't enjoy period instruments, so I wouldn't know if they're any good. But worth checking out probably - it's always fun when a major pianist turns to period performances

  7. #35
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    For full cycle of sonatas - Badura-Skoda (early records, not hammerklavier) and Kempff. For late sonatas - Brendel and Richter.

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    Senior Member joen_cph's Avatar
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    Some I like are Yudina, Richter, Kovacevich, Sofronitzky, Lupu, a bit of Brendel's and Schnabel's, etc.

    Should I find D'Alberto's complete set, I'll grab that too, it seems to be interesting.

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  10. #37
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    Have you checked out Asaf Blasberg?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQIdJKrozS8&t=300s

  11. #38
    Senior Member Helgi's Avatar
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    I've been enjoying Paul Lewis' recordings lately, his series on Harmonia Mundi

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  13. #39
    Senior Member Dimace's Avatar
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    Ingrid Haebler, my dear friends. The very best and the one who won the 1954 (First Place, Gold medal) Schubert-Wettbewerb. Incomparable in everything she has performed.
    „Es gibt drei Arten von Pianisten: jüdische Pianisten, homosexuelle Pianisten -- und schlechte Pianisten.“ V. Horowitz

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  15. #40
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Alfred Brendel and Christian Zacharias, thank you.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  16. #41
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    For me, it's Arthur Schnabel (historical), Clara Haskil (anything you can find): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLkttlDv8QE, Emil Gilels (especially his brilliant Moments Musicaux on EMI, but also his Schubert on RCA Victor & Melodiya--if the sound is acceptable), Maria João Pires (on DG & Erato), Radu Lupu (especially his Decca 8 Impromptus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qklN...oguEhnDuNDs4tU), Edwin Fischer (historical, especially his 8 Impromptus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYob-GFrKwE), Dinu Lipatti, Sviatoslav Richter, Alfred Brendel (his first Philips recordings from the 1970s--mostly analogue--especially in the superb AMSI remasters: https://www.amazon.com/Brendel-Spiel.../dp/B001BNQJDC), Michel Dalberto (his complete Denon box set, also issued by Brilliant), and Ingrid Haebler (her complete recordings released in a 7 CD discount set: https://www.amazon.com/Collectors-Sc...s=music&sr=1-2). I've also like some of Vladimir Ashkenazy's Schubert on Decca, as well as Valery Afanassiev in D. 960 (on ECM, & Denon). & from Brendel's later digital Philips series, I most liked his D. 845/D.946 (though his earlier recordings of these sonatas may be slightly better): https://www.amazon.com/Schubert-Pian...s=music&sr=1-1.

    EDIT: Oh yes, I forgot to mention that I like Lazar Berman in Schubert's final Piano Sonata, D. 960:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j563TD47yzs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRpkXQA3fBk
    as well as Maria Yudina, Arthur Schnabel, & Clara Haskil in D. 960, too:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBOxy3GaceU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1ZBbwFk9Lw

    On a period piano, I've liked Malcolm Bilson (his complete cycle on Hungaroton): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xg3sdaXnVr8 , and Paul Badura Skoda (on Arcana, who has also recorded Schubert on a modern piano, as well). Jan Vermeulen's Etcetera label series played on a very rare, original Nanette Streicher fortepiano from 1826 (which was found in good condition) can be interesting, too (but for alternative listening, it's not a first or second period choice): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dj18g8qrATA

    In the Fantasie in F minor, D. 940--which is a favorite Schubert work of mine--I've most liked the following 6 recordings on a piano: Maria João Pires/Ricardo Castro (DG): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO5fLLHj55k, Alfred Brendel/Evelyn Crochet (Vox/Turnabout): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3CXVOsQMSo, Maria João Pires/Hüseyin Sermet (Erato): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcmvfp2tHDk, Sviatoslav Richter/Benjamin Britten (BBC), Emil Gilels/Elena Gilels (DG):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRib_c8jXu4, and Murray Perahia/Radu Lupu (Sony/CBS).

    Plus, it's very interesting to hear the 4-hand Fantasie played on a period piano, by Robert Levin & Malcolm Bilson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKZtB2WE8WE.
    Last edited by Josquin13; Mar-22-2021 at 12:40.

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  18. #42
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    I enjoy all the pianists mentioned, but a wild card ("because I cut the brakes!") that is rarely mentioned is Stephen Kovacevich. He's very good in the later sonatas, especially the last masterpiece.
    "It should have worked." - Arthur Carlson

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  20. #43
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Shai Wosner is the new kid on the block. One to watch .
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  21. #44
    Senior Member Fazioli's Avatar
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    Overall, Arrau is my favorite, but lately I've been enjoying Andrea Lucchesini's Schubert recordings.

  22. #45
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    Oh, so VERY-fine, Josquin, and many thanks! Well, it might seem obvious that Schnabel (of course), Richter and others might seem obvious choices .. but also, mentioning, Brendel or Evelyn Crochet ... on those "old" recordings ... Haebler, Bilson, Dalberto and the other unknowns are ones that we should find. Well, by golly, here's another name, and another wonderful pianist of the past - Lili Kraus.

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