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Thread: Is There an Underlying Value You Look To Satisfy In Your Evaluation of Art?

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Default Is There an Underlying Value You Look To Satisfy In Your Evaluation of Art?

    For me, it has to fit my arbitrary appraisal of being high standard Art; Art that holds itself to what I feel are very high standards of class, intelligence and execution of the works.

    This includes Art Music, prose that utilizes proper language, painters/sculptors that are clear and vivid in their works and film that also uses proper language (mostly musicals).

    You may think it's silly to have a value such as this, but to me it means everything. I want my Art to be a reflection of the kind of man I aim to be in life!
    Last edited by Captainnumber36; Oct-04-2019 at 04:21.

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    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
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    Has to be either beautiful or at least interesting from a certain perspective. I'm very suspicious of Art that is not one thing or another, but alludes to being either or both.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil loves classical View Post
    Has to be either beautiful or at least interesting from a certain perspective. I'm very suspicious of Art that is not one thing or another, but alludes to being either or both.
    Do you find Mozart beautiful and the atonal folks more on the interesting side?

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    Is There an Underlying Value You Look To Satisfy In Your Evaluation of Art?

    Uhh, no; am I supposed to get one?

    Basically, this sounds like "If the art reinforces my own opinion of what I think art should be, then it's good."

    There's no mystery left in that attitude; it's all determined by the viewer's own ideas about what art is supposed to be.

    Where is "the receptive?"

    It is not his task to try to lead—that would only make him lose the way—but to let himself be led. If he knows how to meet fate with an attitude of acceptance, he is sure to find the right guidance. The superior man lets himself be guided; he does not go ahead blindly, but learns from the situation what is demanded of him and then follows this intimation from fate.

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    Is There an Underlying Value You Look To Satisfy In Your Evaluation of Art?

    Uhh, no; am I supposed to get one?

    Basically, this sounds like "If the art reinforces my own opinion of what I think art should be, then it's good."

    There's no mystery left in that attitude; it's all determined by the viewer's own ideas about what art is supposed to be.

    Where is "the receptive?"

    It is not his task to try to lead—that would only make him lose the way—but to let himself be led. If he knows how to meet fate with an attitude of acceptance, he is sure to find the right guidance. The superior man lets himself be guided; he does not go ahead blindly, but learns from the situation what is demanded of him and then follows this intimation from fate.
    You don't have to have one, I see nothing wrong with taking the mystery out of it and discovering what it is that is important to me in Art.

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    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Actually I don't spend much time consciously "evaluating" art. I just take it in for whatever pleasure it can afford me. I'll probably, at some level of awareness, form some judgment of its quality, but unless I'm writing a review or an analysis or have some other need to critique its qualities I'm much more concerned simply with the emotional and intellectual experience of taking it in.

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    Actually I don't spend much time consciously "evaluating" art. I just take it in for whatever pleasure it can afford me. I'll probably, at some level of awareness, form some judgment of its quality, but unless I'm writing a review or an analysis or have some other need to critique its qualities I'm much more concerned simply with the emotional and intellectual experience of taking it in.
    I ask an intellectually based question, does this appeal to me? If it does, I have a positive reaction and can break down the different aspects of it that I enjoy.

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    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captainnumber36 View Post
    I ask an intellectually based question, does this appeal to me? If it does, I have a positive reaction and can break down the different aspects of it that I enjoy.
    How is "Does this appeal to me?" an intellectually based question? Can't you tell whether music appeals to you before you start asking questions? What makes a question "intellectually based" anyway?

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    How is "Does this appeal to me?" an intellectually based question? Can't you tell whether music appeals to you before you start asking questions? What makes a question "intellectually based" anyway?
    Asking a question is based in the intellect.

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    edited and deleted.
    Last edited by Captainnumber36; Oct-04-2019 at 06:06.

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    Senior Member Eva Yojimbo's Avatar
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    No. There was a time when I did this, when I had grand ideas about some underlying unifying principle that marked all great art, but since then I've come to like such an enormously broad spectrum of art that I find it impossible to think of any underlying principle or standard that they all possess. It ultimately just comes down to what moves me emotionally and intellectually, and I don't think there's any unifying principle for art that manages to do that.

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    Senior Member Fabulin's Avatar
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    I look for beauty or wisdom. If something is neither, it better be functionally indispensable for human life. Garbage cans for example are (usually) neither beautiful, nor convey wisdom, but are useful.
    Then there is some music that is not beautiful... so basically does nothing.

    My philosophy considers "final satisfaction", where you proudly sit down and do nothing, and as a result can do whatever you like, because nothing matters---impossible---because the only way everything is relative to me, is being good or bad relatively to something else.

    In fact, I don't really have the concept of "whatever".
    Last edited by Fabulin; Oct-04-2019 at 11:33.

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    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    It should satisfy me in some way and go on doing so. What this involves is hard to articulate - I am actually not even aware of it really - and it can satisfy in many different ways. But with familiar periods and artists I am quite good at recognising the potential before I am fully acquainted with a piece. With books I find that the works I really value live on in my head so I can remember scenes and characters years later. Such books need time which is something I often only have in spurts. But I have found that I can put down the books I really value and pick them up again months later to continue where I left off with no loss of memory for what went before. There are other books I enjoy - Le Carre, Mankell, Ambler and others - but they are easy (if still intelligent) fast reads and I often forget a lot of them fairly quickly. It may be the same with music but I know a lot more music and tend not to bother with the easy type very much.

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Art that unfolds for us in time--literature, film, music--for me resonates best by interspersing "cusp" experiences with interludes of then savoring the new paths that each cusp experience has set me upon. Cusps are those times within the unfolding of the piece when we are conscious of the art seizing us and rapidly accelerating us toward a perhaps somewhat expected but never fully predictable change of direction, theme, intensity, tempo, character.

    With Art that presents itself as a single entity in a very short period of time--painting, sculpture--I experience either the portrayal of the cusp, or of the contemplation of the path that the art is portraying between postulated cusps. Quiet yet numinous landscape painting falls into that latter category; many well-known paintings by Van Gogh would fall into the former.

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    In my view music is intuitive art. I can't explain it, but I feel it.
    For example, for me:
    Bad music - Beethoven String Quartet in F Major Op. 59 No. 1.
    Good music - Dittersdorf String Quartet No.1 D Major

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