Page 2 of 13 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 195

Thread: Verdi baritones

  1. #16
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    14,552
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Why go to the ancient and crackling recordings when we have such riches decently recorded?
    To discover the possibilities of singing technique and style, and often a standard of comparison. Of course you have to understand what you're hearing in imperfect sound. In the case of baritones, whose voices recorded rather well even on acoustic recordings, that's relatively easy.

  2. Likes wkasimer, WildThing liked this post
  3. #17
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,595
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wkasimer View Post
    You're missing a couple of great ones - Nicolae Herlea and Hugo Hasslo. Andrei Ivanov, in Russian, is a bit bland, but it's an impressive voice. It's a shame that neither Pavel Lisitsian or Matteo Manuguerra made a complete recording of the role.
    Must confess I've never heard of any of these guys. Did Herlea and Hasslo make complete recordings?

  4. #18
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    14,552
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wkasimer View Post
    You're missing a couple of great ones - Nicolae Herlea and Hugo Hasslo. Andrei Ivanov, in Russian, is a bit bland, but it's an impressive voice. It's a shame that neither Pavel Lisitsian or Matteo Manuguerra made a complete recording of the role.
    Stracciari in the 1930 recording with Capsir and Borgioli. Too ancient for DavidA, no doubt, but indispensable for baritone lovers.

  5. Likes wkasimer liked this post
  6. #19
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,595
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    To discover the possibilities of singing technique and style, and often a standard of comparison. Of course you have to understand what you're hearing in imperfect sound. In the case of baritones, whose voices recorded rather well even on acoustic recordings, that's relatively easy.
    Ah yes, I remember the voice of Peter Dawson booming out the 'Covered Wagon lullaby' and 'Empty Saddles' on my grandfather's old windup gramophone!

  7. #20
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sharon, Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,051
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Must confess I've never heard of any of these guys. Did Herlea and Hasslo make complete recordings?
    Yes - Herlea on a Romanian recording issued on CD by Vox, and Hasslo on BIS with Ehrling, Gedda, and Margareta Hallin. Both fairly easy to find on Amazon.

    There's also a fine recording, auf Deutsch, with Metternich, Schock, and Streich - issued on Audite in pretty good sound.

  8. #21
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,595
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wkasimer View Post
    Yes - Herlea on a Romanian recording issued on CD by Vox, and Hasslo on BIS with Ehrling, Gedda, and Margareta Hallin. Both fairly easy to find on Amazon.

    There's also a fine recording, auf Deutsch, with Metternich, Schock, and Streich - issued on Audite in pretty good sound.
    Verdi in German - no thanks!

  9. #22
    Senior Member Sieglinde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Hungary
    Posts
    464
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    For Rigoletto, I grew up on the Gobbi recording, so I'm used to every little mannerism and colour he had XD There were certainly more plush and beautiful voices than his, but he was one hella expressive singer.

    I also had a lot of recordings with Milnes, so he was my gold standard for a long time. What a passionate and noble Rodrigo! Also love his Boccanegra - I have never seen anyone else so frightening in the curse scene. He rolled a nat 20 on Intimidation there.

    Of course, in Hungary, we also have (and had) some excellent baritones, like György Melis, Imre Palló, Lajos Miller. Nowadays, Mihály Kálmándi and Zoltán Kelemen (plus we adopted Anatoly Fokanov).

  10. #23
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sharon, Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,051
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Verdi in German - no thanks!
    Well, suit yourself. If you insist upon opera in the original language, you’re missing out on some terrific performances on records.
    Last edited by wkasimer; Oct-09-2019 at 12:28.

  11. Likes Tsaraslondon liked this post
  12. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    1,504
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    For today's lot Finley comes close. (I have to hear more.)

  13. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    There is a long tradition of singing Verdi in German, that produced some of the finest Verdian singing ever.


    As an example, just listen to Danish tenor Helge Rosvaenge singing "Celeste Aida" (well, "Holde Aida", really), the way it's written on the score:



  14. Likes Tsaraslondon, Woodduck liked this post
  15. #26
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    5,547
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Verdi in German - no thanks!
    I doubt Verdi would have onjected so why should you?

    Most of Fritz Wunderlich's recording of Italian opera excerpts are in German, but, regardless of language, it is some of the most golden toned, italianate tenor singing you will ever hear.



    Hermann Prey doesn't do badly either.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

  16. Likes Woodduck liked this post
  17. #27
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,595
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wkasimer View Post
    Well, suit yourself. If you insist upon opera in the original language, you’re missing out on some terrific performances on records.
    I don’t doubt you but to me Verdi in English is a step far enough

  18. #28
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,595
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post
    I doubt Verdi would have onjected so why should you?

    Most of Fritz Wunderlich's recording of Italian opera excerpts are in German, but, regardless of language, it is some of the most golden toned, italianate tenor singing you will ever hear.



    Hermann Prey doesn't do badly either.
    Never feel Verdi sounds right in German. On what authority have you have said that Verdi would have given the OK for performances in German to English speaking Audiences? I have Wunderlicht’s singing Verdi too. Just doesn’t sound right.
    Last edited by DavidA; Oct-09-2019 at 15:16.

  19. #29
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    5,547
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Never feel Verdi sounds right in German. On what authority have you have said that Verdi would have given the OK for performances in German to English speaking Audiences? I have Wunderlicht’s singing Verdi too. Just doesn’t sound right.
    Who has been giving performances of Verdi in German to English speaking audiences? I don't think I've come across any. However, as far as I'm aware, it was common practice for opera to be performed in the vernacular (ie German) in Germany, just as it was common (and still is) to hear opera in English here in the UK.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

  20. Likes WildThing, Woodduck liked this post
  21. #30
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    14,552
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by schigolch View Post
    There is a long tradition of singing Verdi in German, that produced some of the finest Verdian singing ever.


    As an example, just listen to Danish tenor Helge Rosvaenge singing "Celeste Aida" (well, "Holde Aida", really), the way it's written on the score:


    I've heard very few performances in Italian as convincing as this! It's extraordinary to hear Rosvaenge's heroic voice filed down to a pianissimo in the final bars.

    Back to baritones, Germany produced at least one great "Verdi baritone," the marvelous Joseph Schwarz (1880-1926). Here he gives, in 1919, as vocally splendid and heart-rending a performance of Rigoletto's "Cortigiani, vil razza dannata" as you will ever hear:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nl2VFkLga-U

    Just as fine is Lauritz Melchior as Otello. I'll include him here since he began his career as a baritone and since, like Roswaenge and Schwarz, he can compete with anyone singing Verdi in Italian:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_X1-Sw5R1Q

    If we had any singer equal to any of these three performing this music today, I would happily listen to Verdi in Tagalog or Swahili.

  22. Likes Tsaraslondon, schigolch, wkasimer liked this post
Page 2 of 13 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •