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Thread: Birgit Nilsson - A League of her Own

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    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Default Birgit Nilsson - A League of her Own



    I found this documentary on YouTube. I don't know whether anyone else has shared it but I'm certainly enjoying watching it. What a voice!

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    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    I found this documentary on YouTube. I don't know whether anyone else has shared it but I'm certainly enjoying watching it. What a voice!
    Honesty compels me to admit that I don't really enjoy listening to Nilsson on recordings.

    A couple of days ago, I listened to a Preiser CD of four great Wagnerian sopranos, Frida Leider, Nanny Larsen-Todsen, Kirsten Flagstad, and Helen Traubel:

    4sops.jpg

    While I never heard any of them (or Nilsson, for that matter) in the flesh, I couldn't help but think how much more I enjoyed all four of them, than I do Nilsson.

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    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkasimer View Post
    Honesty compels me to admit that I don't really enjoy listening to Nilsson on recordings.

    A couple of days ago, I listened to a Preiser CD of four great Wagnerian sopranos, Frida Leider, Nanny Larsen-Todsen, Kirsten Flagstad, and Helen Traubel:

    4sops.jpg

    While I never heard any of them (or Nilsson, for that matter) in the flesh, I couldn't help but think how much more I enjoyed all four of them, than I do Nilsson.
    One interesting point in the documentary was when Christa Ludwig and others Said that you couldn’t really capture the huge voice on recordings. It had to be experienced in the theatre live to appreciate it. I must confess that she has always been a soprano whose voice I have admired greatly rather than loved But the documentary did give you an idea of the human side.

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    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    As a young Wagner lover I never imagined I'd see Wotan's daughter playing the organ in bare feet!

    Lovely biography that really seems to conveys her qualities as a person. Once in a while nature produces something unpredictable and unrepeatable. I think Nilsson was in a genus of her own; her voice was so unusual - in its timbre, its virtues and its faults - that it seems pointless to compare it with anyone else's. I was fortunate - determined, actually - to hear her in the opera house as Isolde and the Gotterdammerung Brunnhilde (in one of the performances she sang after injuring her shoulder).

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    Senior Member Seattleoperafan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    As a young Wagner lover I never imagined I'd see Wotan's daughter playing the organ in bare feet!

    Lovely biography that really seems to conveys her qualities as a person. Once in a while nature produces something unpredictable and unrepeatable. I think Nilsson was in a genus of her own; her voice was so unusual - in its timbre, its virtues and its faults - that it seems pointless to compare it with anyone else's. I was fortunate - determined, actually - to hear her in the opera house as Isolde and the Gotterdammerung Brunnhilde (in one of the performances she sang after injuring her shoulder).
    I am so jealous. I normally only enjoy her with live recordings with the mics way back in the house so you can get more the effect of the voice in a house. I LOVE her as a person. It would have been great to see her late in her career as isolde or Elektra under Wieland Wagner who made her into an actress of considerable talent. One of the best actresses ever at that point in her career. 45 min. ovations.
    Last edited by Seattleoperafan; Oct-11-2019 at 14:39.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    One interesting point in the documentary was when Christa Ludwig and others Said that you couldn’t really capture the huge voice on recordings. It had to be experienced in the theatre live to appreciate it. I must confess that she has always been a soprano whose voice I have admired greatly rather than loved But the documentary did give you an idea of the human side.
    I relate to that statement by Ludwig.
    I notice that voices like Giordani and Radvanovsky, for example, (both with chandelier shaking voices), definitely are not loved by the airwaves.

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