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Thread: Wagner vs. R. Strauss

  1. #76
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    A few months ago I went to Cosi fan Tutte, and in the second half, when you get back from the interval, there's a sequence of arias designed to let each of the main singers strut their stuff. I was so bored by it all I thought I would die of boredom, I regretted not staying in the bar.

    Much the same at the start of the last act of Otello, where the sequence of the willow song and Ave Maria is really too much aria.
    I have a similar (if maybe less intense) reaction to Cosi, and actually to a lot of "recitative-aria"-structured opera. I can never get all the way through the lengthy succession of numbers in most 18th-century operas; Mozart and Handel defeat almost my every attempt - I tend to give up after an act or two - even though the individual numbers are fine music. I need to see such operas in the theater. The constantly developing musical texture of more modern operas - Wagner, Strauss, Puccini, Britten, etc. - is much more interesting to me and can hold me for the entire work.
    Last edited by Woodduck; Nov-12-2019 at 17:45.

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  3. #77
    Senior Member Tchaikov6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    I have a similar (if maybe less intense) reaction to Cosi, and actually to a lot of "recitative-aria"-structured opera. I can never get all the way through thea lengthy succession of numbers in most 18th-century operas; Mozart and Handel defeat almost my every attempt - I tend to give up after an act or two - even though the individual numbers are fine music. I need to see such operas in the theater. The constantly developing musical texture of more modern operas - Wagner, Strauss, Puccini, Britten, etc. - is much more interesting to me and can hold me for the entire work.
    Same here, although I'd put the first act of The Marriage of Figaro as probably my favorite act in any opera ever... the entire opera is up there, too. The Magic Flute too has a surprisingly novel development of the leitmotif that I'm sure influenced Wagner.

  4. #78
    Senior Member DaveM's Avatar
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    What’s with these ‘reactions’ to one of Mozart’s most popular, albeit the 4th in line, operas? It’s not like Cosi is a relatively unknown opera. Why would anyone go to a well-known opera of this caliber live and be bored? And why would anyone listen to the entire recording with the recitatives when there are several recordings of the arias without the recitatives? Or is it that the arias themselves that are boring? Geez!
    Last edited by DaveM; Nov-12-2019 at 20:21.

  5. #79
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    Well there are many nice things in Cosi Fan Tutte. Don Alfonso is one of my role models in life! And I always laugh out loud when they get decked out as Albanians, and she uses that mesmerism machine.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Nov-12-2019 at 20:27.

  6. #80
    Senior Member amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    Much the same at the start of the last act of Otello, where the sequence of the willow song and Ave Maria is really too much aria.
    Now that you say it, I guess it's possible someone could feel that way.
    Alan

  7. #81
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    As they say, comparisons are odorous . I adore the music of both composers and would not want to be without either . Of course, Strauss owes so much to Wagner, but he developed his own individual voice as a composer . His operas and symphonic poems could never have come into existence without Wagner, but this is true of so many other outstanding composers such as Mahler, Bruckner , Schoenberg, Zemlinsky and others .
    Enough apples and oranges !

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  9. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by amfortas View Post
    Now that you say it, I guess it's possible someone could feel that way.
    I think it’s quite common to cut one of them.

  10. #83
    Senior Member amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    I think it’s quite common to cut one of them.
    Zeffirelli did in his film. I would hope that ends the list, but people are capable of anything.
    Alan

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