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Thread: Which composers have been considered world's best during their lifetime?

  1. #16
    Senior Member chu42's Avatar
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    Moritz Moszkowski was held the same way Rachmaninov is now.

    Joseph Raff had Brahms status.

    Muzio Clementi was admired by many, including Beethoven.

    Luigi Cherubini was considered to Beethoven's greatest contemporary.

    All of these composers mentioned are no long much in the standard repertoire.

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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by chu42 View Post
    Moritz Moszkowski was held the same way Rachmaninov is now.

    Joseph Raff had Brahms status.

    Muzio Clementi was admired by many, including Beethoven.

    Luigi Cherubini was considered to Beethoven's greatest contemporary.

    All of these composers mentioned are no long much in the standard repertoire.
    In Clementi's case that's a real shame. His piano sonatas are really quite delightful to listen to. He was a genuine piano pioneer.

  4. #18
    Senior Member Fabulin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    When people's individual opinions weren't taken as seriously by the people spouting them?
    What do you mean by that?
    Last edited by Fabulin; Nov-07-2019 at 18:38.

  5. #19
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    What composer would you choose, Woodduck? Gee, I haven't got a clue!
    Five posts from you, in one single day, in different threads, all referring to me!

    This is creepy. Is there a sixth waiting in ambush somewhere? Am I being stalked? Do I need to get a restraining order?

    I wouldn't be able to answer the OP's question with confidence, so I choose not to contribute.
    Last edited by Woodduck; Nov-08-2019 at 06:33.

  6. #20
    Senior Member Baron Scarpia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    A tiny problem: Let’s take Beethoven. Informed opinion in Vienna would probably have placed him at the top of the pile from 1802 or so onwards. But Vienna at that time was a pretty small place by modern standards, maybe 200 thousand people. Where I live, it might get three or four freeway off-ramps.

    But in France (for instance) Beethoven was less known and less respected. And Italy was so uninterested that it waited until 1860 for its first performance of the Eroica.

    It goes without saying that in Korea, Japan, and a hundred other countries Beethoven was totally unknown and local favorites were much preferred.

    So what do we mean by “world’s best”? And considered that by whom?
    Granted, there wasn't a global marketplace in those days and there is no clear definition of the absolute "best," then or now. But I don't think you will find many composers who are regarded today as "masters" who weren't recognized as top tier during their lifetimes within their geographical/cultural sphere of activity.
    There are two kinds of music, good music and the other kind. - Duke Ellington.

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  8. #21
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baron Scarpia View Post
    Granted, there wasn't a global marketplace in those days and there is no clear definition of the absolute "best," then or now. But I don't think you will find many composers who are regarded today as "masters" who weren't recognized as top tier during their lifetimes within their geographical/cultural sphere of activity.
    Given those qualifications, I think I can be dragged, kicking and screaming, into agreement with you!
    Last edited by KenOC; Nov-08-2019 at 21:09.


  9. #22
    Senior Member chu42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by classical yorkist View Post
    In Clementi's case that's a real shame. His piano sonatas are really quite delightful to listen to. He was a genuine piano pioneer.
    So was Hummel and CPE Bach; while these two aren't exactly forgotten they are more remembered for works outside of piano repertoire and they were much more popular when they were alive rather than today.

    When Mozart said "Bach is the father and we are the children", he was referring to CPE rather than Johann Sebastien!
    Last edited by chu42; Nov-08-2019 at 21:23.

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  11. #23
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    I think that can be said of Ockeghem and Josquin.

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