Banner: The symphonic suite Cantabile

Page 1 of 14 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 200

Thread: Mahler Symphony no 6

  1. #1
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,788
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Mahler Symphony no 6

    Not yo be confused with the current Solti / CSO thread.

    This is an incredible and even disturbing work. Favoured recordings?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bwv 1080's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    6 (and 7) is Boulez for me

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Posts
    13,189
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm in a Boulez kick also.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bill Cooke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    107
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Bernstein/Vienna was my introduction to the piece. I always thought it was magnificent until I tried Karajan, which became my go-to recording until I read so many bad reviews of it and thought I better explore other interpretations.

    Lately I'm really enjoying Mariss Jansons with the LSO. It is strong on all counts: recorded sound, forward drive, drama, detail.

    If you don't mind mono recordings, there's a live 1955 recording by Mitropoulos and the NYP that has great drive and character. Unfortunately the sonics are rather limited and audience noise is noticeable.

    If Sanderling is ever re-released, I'll add that one to my collection, too.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,189
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I have four prime recommendations:

    Sir John Barbirolli (EMI)
    Eduard van Beinum (Tahra)
    Leonard Bernstein (DG)
    Jascha Horenstein (1969) (BBC)

    And then for additional listening:

    Sir John Barbirolli (Testament)
    Dmitri Mitropoulos (1955) (Archipel, NYPO)
    Hermann Scherchen (1961) (Tahra)
    Leonard Bernstein (Sony)
    Herbert von Karajan (DG)
    Thomas Sanderling (Real Sound)

    Some say the studio Barbirolli is too slow in the beginning movement. To me it is one of the most powerful symphony recordings of which I know, one of the great Mahler recordings of all time alongside the Ferrier/Walter DLVDE, Walter 1939 1st, Horenstein 8th, and Barbirolli’s live 1960 9th.

  6. Likes Totenfeier liked this post
  7. #6
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    3,867
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Lots of great 6ths out there but for me Currentzis (recent favourite) , Jansons (both RCO & LSO) , Sanderling, Gielen, Kubelik (Audite), Tilson Thomas, Jarvi and Bernstein nail it. For two dark horses that ride roughshod over Mahler's wishes, but both sound great, I'll go for Barbirolli's dark as hell 6th and Karajan's orchestral perfection (the BPO play brilliantly).

  8. Likes Granate, Konsgaard liked this post
  9. #7
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,788
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merl View Post
    Lots of great 6ths out there but for me Currentzis (recent favourite) , Jansons (both RCO & LSO) , Sanderling, Gielen, Kubelik (Audite), Tilson Thomas, Jarvi and Bernstein nail it. For two dark horses that ride roughshod over Mahler's wishes, but both sound great, I'll go for Barbirolli's dark as hell 6th and Karajan's orchestral perfection (the BPO play brilliantly).
    This business of riding roughshod over Mahler's wishes - there seem to be many different ways of interpreting the music. Even those who knew him - Walter and Klemperer - conducted it in very different ways. I've heard said Klemperer ignores Mahler's markings in some of his performances. Even Mahler conducted his own music different ways. So some guidance as to who is conducting it the correct way is welcome!

  10. Likes Manxfeeder liked this post
  11. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,189
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    “I curse the conductor who does not do all he can to improve my music!”

    - Gustav Mahler

  12. Likes DavidA liked this post
  13. #9
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    3,867
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    This business of riding roughshod over Mahler's wishes - there seem to be many different ways of interpreting the music. Even those who knew him - Walter and Klemperer - conducted it in very different ways. I've heard said Klemperer ignores Mahler's markings in some of his performances. Even Mahler conducted his own music different ways. So some guidance as to who is conducting it the correct way is welcome!
    Fair comment. Let's just say that they are two very different ends of the Mahler 6th spectrum.

  14. Likes DavidA liked this post
  15. #10
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,788
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Just listening to Tennstedt's studio recording. Scary stuff full of jagged edges. Just one movement at a time I think.

    BTW opinions about the order of movements [order of 2 and 3] and recordings which differ?
    Last edited by DavidA; Jan-14-2019 at 21:36.

  16. #11
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    3,867
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Just listening to Tennstedt's studio recording. Scary stuff full of jagged edges. Just one movement at a time I think.

    BTW opinions about the order of movements [order of 2 and 3] and recordings which differ?
    I prefer Andante - Scherzo but I'm still OK with it the other way round sometimes. If I'm playing it on cd I'll often program it in A - S (and same in the car as I often reorder the track numbers). If not I'm not unduly bothered.
    Last edited by Merl; Jan-14-2019 at 22:07.

  17. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    1,519
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Boulez, Thomas Sanderling and Karajan. I'm a Scherzo-Andante person, but it's pure coincidence that those three recordings happen to follow that order. (I tend to programme playback to S-A on my other recordings in any case.)

  18. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,189
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I’ve never understood the S-A argument. In a S-A when I hear the beginning of S with repeated chord strikes I feel like I just finished hearing that already. A provides the correct contrast. And then S provides the perfect contrast following A. And then the slow, mysterious opening of the final movement makes the most sense after S. What am I missing?

  19. Likes OperaChic, wkasimer liked this post
  20. #14
    Senior Member Larkenfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sedona
    Posts
    4,272
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brahmsianhorn View Post
    I’ve never understood the S-A argument. In a S-A when I hear the beginning of S with repeated chord strikes I feel like I just finished hearing that already. A provides the correct contrast. And then S provides the perfect contrast following A. And then the slow, mysterious opening of the final movement makes the most sense after S. What am I missing?
    Bravo. I feel exactly the same way. You aren’t missing anything. That’s a good reason why Mahler probably changed it. And he never reverted to any other order while he was alive, and it was played that way for 10 years after he died. There’s no justification for playing it any other way, IMO. It’s top-heavy with an unrelenting, redundant, percussive turbulence in any other order and he wanted more contrast between the first two movements. I believe the need for the change became obvious to him when the 6th was being rehearsed before its premiere. That had been his first chance to hear it performed live and he clearly decided—and he formally instructed his publisher likewise. Alma was the meddler.
    Last edited by Larkenfield; Jan-14-2019 at 23:51.
    "That's all Folks!"

  21. Likes Merl liked this post
  22. #15
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,788
    Post Thanks / Like

Page 1 of 14 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •