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Thread: Oboe

  1. #1
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    I'm a huge oboe fan. My daughter started flute, but I suggested she also play the oboe. It's a very difficult instrument, tonally...it's been a struggle to get her to the point where it's not sounding like a goose calling contest...and she's still off/on...

    Her instructor is wonderful too...part of the reason we're both so enthused about the instrument...looking forward to lessons again this fall (I enjoy sitting in...even if that's considered a bad thing...to have a parent sit in on lessons)...

    I'll stick with my strings at this point in the game...but if I was going to pick up a woodwind...it would be the oboe...hands down...
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

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    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    (I enjoy sitting in...even if that&#39;s considered a bad thing...to have a parent sit in on lessons)...
    LOL

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    The oboe produces really beautiful sound...I&#39;ll love to learn it too if I have the time.
    So yr daughter play flute now, and also oboe?
    Give her the clarinet and bassoon also and she&#39;d have the whole woodwind section.
    But technnically speaking it&#39;s hard for woodwind players to switch between woodwind instruments, unlike string players ( violin to viola etc.)...
    Because each woodwind instrument requires different mouth/lip structure. I think so... Is is so , Baroque Flute?

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    Yes, she started piano at age 4...(and recently completed her Grade 4 RCM exam)...then for band back when she was in Grade 4 in school she picked flute...and I egged her on to start oboe in Grade 5(why? There were 30 kazillion flautists...and the only oboist was graduating from high school...all that in addition to my loving the sound of the instrument - BTW I like the flute very much too...but a band or ensemble sounds richer I think, with a variety of instruments....

    I think there are particular difficulties associated with the embouchare (sp?) of double reeded instruments...
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

  5. #5
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    ...oh yeah..the bassoon was next on my &#39;short list&#39;...heh heh heh...

    ...I was thinking of trying to coax my 9 year old son into trying it...but he wants to play the trombone...and I think he&#39;ll do better with brass...

    ...unfortunately I lost the battle to keep my 14 year old son in the band program (Tenor Sax). He loved it when he started in Grade 5, but the past two years with the new band instructor have been brutal...he doesn&#39;t like her and I gave up the fight to keep him in it...
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

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    ...unfortunately I lost the battle to keep my 14 year old son in the band program (Tenor Sax). He loved it when he started in Grade 5, but the past two years with the new band instructor have been brutal...he doesn&#39;t like her and I gave up the fight to keep him in it...
    I hate to read about accounts of Brutal, bad band instructors..They always make me really angry&#33; To think that decent kids with good enough playing hates music and lose self-confidence because of &#39;angry&#39; machines like them&#33; If u don&#39;t have the heart to share , then please don&#39;t go into teaching. Angry, abusive people are not suitable for that job. You only make yrself and people suffer.
    Right? I hate to walk past music romms, only to hear instructors yelling at band members. It&#39;s really disheartening even to a by-passer like me. :angry:

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    With this instructor it was/is more a matter of her not being able to make the program &#39;fun&#39; (I&#39;ve heard this from most of the parents and kids). On a one-one level, I quite like her...and I understand that the kids need to practice and be organized to make the band sound good...otherwise it&#39;s discouraging for all of them when they perform...

    ...but how many young kids (ages 10-14) are so into music that they&#39;ll practice and do well if it&#39;s not fun? Only a handful of diehards...but then you don&#39;t have enough other players to fully round out the band and again, I think the performance suffers.

    You need your good players (and they move up to first chair) but you also need your more mediocre player to fill up the spaces. My son is in the mediocre category...but he was so discouraged this last year he stopped practicing too...which made the situation worse of course...

    All you don&#39;t need are the really really bad players...but even they can improve if the desire is there...with some private lessons and personal interest shown them...
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

  8. #8
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    With this instructor it was/is more a matter of her not being able to make the program &#39;fun&#39; (I&#39;ve heard this from most of the parents and kids).
    Ok, I understand now.
    It&#39;s hard enough to try to teach kids, but teaching in groups is wow&#33;
    I&#39;ve had choir combined session with 200 over kids, they drive me crazy all the time.
    But it&#39;s always rewarding if the lesson is to remain fun and upbeat.
    The children will love to come for practice and really put in every ounce of effort....and as an instructor, I&#39;ll look foward to the next practice and so on...( no matter how pissed I am at the end of the day.)
    So, good class &#39;atmosphere&#39; is of utmost importance when teaching group lesson. If not, every seconds will feel like painful hours, and in the end, u&#39;ll hardly get anything done. :angry:
    But it&#39;s not easy to maintain or even create that level of engagement in class...u need years of good experience as a group teacher of some sort to accomplish that.

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    You&#39;re bang on&#33; I think it&#39;s mostly inexperience mixed in with her personality. If every kid were self-driven I think she&#39;d be great, but she doesn&#39;t seem to have what it takes to inspire the masses...
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

  10. #10
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    I can see why you would like the oboe so much. It was Handel&#39;s personal favorite, too, BTW. Did you know that he called for 24 oboes in his "music for the Royal Fireworks"?&#33;&#33;&#33; About playing several woodwinds, I don&#39;t know. I regularly put down my recorder and pick up my flute with no problem at all, but I&#39;ve never played on a reed instrument.

    It&#39;s really too bad when an instructor fails to motivate a student. But it does especially happen when they are teaching lots of students at once.

  11. #11
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    Aha&#33; I knew I&#39;d have a lot in common with at least one famous composer&#33;&#33;&#33;

    Double reeds are a whole science to themselves&#33; Who woulda thunk it would be so complicated to produce a little reed opening to blow through???
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

  12. #12
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    I love oboe also.
    Its amazing when the oboe comes in with the melody in the middle of an orchestral section...with all instruments playing pp ... It&#39;s like a revealing transition or something.
    Very simple but magical sounding.
    The Cor Anglais is not really an English horn right? It&#39;s an alto oboe, issit?

  13. #13
    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    It is an English horn, but belongs to oboe family.

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    Ah...ha...I&#39;m confused. If it&#39;s a horn , why does it belong to the oboe family? Is it the sound production that makes it belong to the same family, I mean, technically speaking.

  15. #15
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    The name is confusing yes, cor=horn (in name, but actually it isn&#39;t a horn, but an alto oboe)
    It&#39;s a double-reed woodwind instrument with lower pitch than oboe.
    http://www.enchantedlearning.com/language/...s/answers.shtml

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