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Thread: RIP Neal Peart

  1. #16
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    ^^^^Best wishes, senza sordino. And good luck in your continuing exploration of Rush. I have met several people who told me that Rush's music--especially the lyrics as they evolved--helped them get through difficult periods in their lives. It is interesting that Neil Peart, and to some extent, the other two, were in their youth influenced by Ayn Rand. But their songs gradually became less overtly "ideological" and more involved with other issues, including those of a common humanity.

  2. #17
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Peart discusses his passions for writing, traveling, and music.
    Short-term thinkers are rewarded with reelection, while those who dare to take seriously our responsibility to future generations commonly find themselves out of office.

    - Marcia Bjornerud, Geologist

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  4. #18
    Senior Member Tero's Avatar
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    Had a chance to see Rush twice, 40th anniversary tour and Time Machine. I came to Rush late, after my other 70s bands had quit touring. In the progressive rock genre I never saw most of my favorites. Tull once, Ian Anderson later when his voice was failing.

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  6. #19
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
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    Sad news, and unexpected. In my view he was the best rock drummer. Rest in peace.

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  8. #20
    Senior Member BrahmsWasAGreatMelodist's Avatar
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    Rush were the first favorite band I ever had, and probably one of the things that led me to become so interested in music in the first place. Peart's drumming, often at the heart of their sound, was absolutely incredible; as technically proficient as it gets but never without finesse or tact. On top of that, his lyrics are some of my favorite in all of rock music, eloquently penned and passionate in a way that effectively complements the spirit and drive of Rush's music. Peart was a great musician and, from the interviews I've seen of him, a classy guy. May he rest in peace.
    Casual composer, pianist, music enthusiast

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  10. #21
    Senior Member BrahmsWasAGreatMelodist's Avatar
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    A few of their best songs (IMO):

    2112
    Closer to the Heart
    Cygnus X1 Book I: The Voyage
    Cygnus X1 Book II: Hemispheres
    Fly by Night
    Freewill
    Limelight
    Red Barchetta
    Subdivisions
    The Spirit of the Radio
    Time Stand Still
    Last edited by BrahmsWasAGreatMelodist; Jan-12-2020 at 03:48.
    Casual composer, pianist, music enthusiast

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  12. #22
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    NPR has a fine tribute/remembrance of Neil Peart, and some insights into the overall effect Rush (especially through Peart's lyrics) has had on many of its fans:

    https://www.npr.org/2020/01/11/79555...-a-poets-heart

  13. #23
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    Peerless among rock drummers, and one of the few rock drummers whose departure from the band necessitates the band's demise. RIP.

  14. #24
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    ^
    ^
    Agreed. The Who should have split in 1978 after the death of Keith Moon.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

  15. #25
    Senior Member MacLeod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    ^
    ^
    Agreed. The Who should have split in 1978 after the death of Keith Moon.
    Perhaps they should have split before his death.
    "I left TC for a hiatus, but since no-one noticed my absence, I came back again."

  16. #26
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacLeod View Post
    Perhaps they should have split before his death.
    Well, they were fairly dormant for the couple of years leading up to it. Unless he'd got his act together Moon was a spent force anyway - during the Who Are You sessions he was so technically rusty and physically out of condition that he couldn't even play some of the material, so gigs would have been out of the question. I'm not a great fan of the Who Are You album but it still, at least in my opinion, knocked spots off the two which followed when Kenney Jones was in the band. I would agree with you that the Who's decline had begun long before that.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

  17. #27
    Senior Member Tero's Avatar
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    I'm almost as well set with Rush albums compared to the Beatles or Zappa, all studio albums and nearly all live ones. But Neil had quite a lot of complicated stories for lyrics. Some failed of course. I tried to decipher most of them, the sci fi ones not so much.

    I read a bunch of his books too. He had bicycled in China Asia, other spots in Europe etc. Then he got to his primitive organized tour on the West coast of Africa. When traveling any of those places and getting dinner, I always remember Neil's phrase "rice with junk on top." I was in S Korea a few years back and noticed that I was always hungry afterwards if the meal had no rice. So I got rice with junk on top.
    Last edited by Tero; Jan-13-2020 at 14:32.

  18. #28
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    Sad indeed. I only saw Rush once on the Hemispheres tour and they were top notch live. Incredible drummer but I still hate drum solos. Even his.

  19. #29
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    Though I have approximately two dozen Rush albums (split between vinyl and CD), the one I have long returned to over and over is A Farewell to Kings, on which Peart banged drums, orchestral bells, tubular bells, temple blocks, cowbells, wind chimes, bell tree, triangle, and vibra-slap.

    000R-830588-1241053153.jpeg.jpg

    I'll admit I was originally drawn to the band (and to this particular album) more for my interest in the poetry of Coleridge ("Kubla Khan") than for my pursuit of the type of progressive rock fashioned by this Canadian trio, but I quickly fell for "Xanadu", which credits Peart for the lyrics. (Sorry, Samuel T.!) And over the years I actually used the song in classes I taught when the subject of Coleridge's poem came up. ("Kubla Khan" remains a fascinating study of the role of the Romantic artist in his society, among other things.) I also utilized the Griffes tone poem Pleasure Dome of Kubla Khan, which proves an excellent musical background over which to read aloud the Coleridge poem.

    I'm listening to A Farewell to Kings as I type. What a finer way to say farewell to a true king. RIP, Neil Peart.

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  21. #30
    Senior Member chill782002's Avatar
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    Great band. I only got to see them once (in London, on the R30 tour) but what a show. They played a three hour set without a break. I was amazed at the stamina of all three of them, given that they would have been in their early 50s at the time. I can happily listen to any of their 70s output (apart from the first album, which is a bit sub-Zeppelin, but Peart didn't play on that one) whenever the opportunity arises. "Permanent Waves" and "Moving Pictures" were awesome as well but they got a bit too synth-heavy after that for my liking. Tragic for Peart to pass away at such a relatively young age though.

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