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Thread: Vale Sir Roger Scruton

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    Default Vale Sir Roger Scruton

    I'm very sorry to learn about the death of this great man, whose work will be continued by the wonderful Douglas Murray - who wrote this moving panegyric to his mentor and friend:

    https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2020/0...-than-the-age/

    Scruton and Murray shared important characteristics: well-reasoned argument based upon history and learning, respect and calm. Both eschew/ed hatred, hysterics, hand-wringing and apocalyptic eco-evangelism.

    Vale Sir Roger Scruton.

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    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
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    he was well known and respected in Czech Republic, he also spoke Czech
    https://www.radio.cz/en/section/book...l-relationship

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    Senior Member BrahmsWasAGreatMelodist's Avatar
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    A bold and outspoken thinker. Though I disagree with most of his major views, I've always been impressed with his respectfulness and eloquence. I recently listened to this:https://youtu.be/9nVzK_prUcs
    which was quite enjoyable and informative and may be of interest to fans of Scruton and music.

    By the way, has anyone read The Aesthetics of Music? It seems pretty interesting.
    Last edited by BrahmsWasAGreatMelodist; Jan-13-2020 at 12:16.
    Casual composer, pianist, music enthusiast

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    Senior Member MacLeod's Avatar
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    I can't say I was a fan, but I recognise his contribution to public debate in the UK. I was more saddened (if that's the right word - I'm not sure what to make of the death of public figures grown old) by the passing of Tony Garnett.

    https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-r...r-dies-aged-83
    "I left TC for a hiatus, but since no-one noticed my absence, I came back again."

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    I too am saddened by the passing of Roger Scruton, a man with whom I too had disagreements but also many areas of agreement. I would, though, note that like many of a somewhat conservative persuasion who are not scientifically literate, Scruton failed to understand--or rather failed to accept--the fact that, in the long run, if not in the short, profound change will be required to deal with the sustainability of our planet. Scientists began becoming uneasy about population and pollution issues many scores of years ago, before AGW appeared as a dire threat compounding the others and being compounded by them. Conservatives such as Scruton by nature hate the idea of profound change, however necessary, and almost always thus are ill-suited to be reliable guides to a better future when presented with such existential issues as worldwide climate change and biosphere degradation. Thus, it is in the areas of esthetics and cultural norms and decent behavior where he will be most sorely missed.

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    I wouldn't say conservatives hate the idea of profound change; it's just that they've seen change and realized it's not synonymous with 'improvement'. Let's mention change and the Left's embrace of it: the Bolshevik Revolution, Pol Pot, China, Venezuela.

    Carefully calibrated reforms are what conservatives value.

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    Senior Member MacLeod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christabel View Post
    I wouldn't say conservatives hate the idea of profound change; it's just that they've seen change and realized it's not synonymous with 'improvement'. Let's mention change and the Left's embrace of it: the Bolshevik Revolution, Pol Pot, China, Venezuela.

    Carefully calibrated reforms are what conservatives value.
    ...and the "Right's" embracing of change: eg Pinochet and Franco...let's not play this simplistic game.
    "I left TC for a hiatus, but since no-one noticed my absence, I came back again."

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christabel View Post
    I wouldn't say conservatives hate the idea of profound change; it's just that they've seen change and realized it's not synonymous with 'improvement'. Let's mention change and the Left's embrace of it: the Bolshevik Revolution, Pol Pot, China, Venezuela.

    Carefully calibrated reforms are what conservatives value.
    Carefully calibrated reforms are something most everyone can support--it's all in the details, the timing, the sincerity with which reforms are proposed. And change is certainly looked upon with disfavor when the outer milieu is itself changing slowly or not at all. The expression "Let No New Thing Arise!" is attributed to many times and cultures. But we are living at a time of rapid and malignant change imposed on us by many factors we have chosen to not address or control; the question today is what magnitude of change will be sufficient.

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    Senior Member philoctetes's Avatar
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    In my experience there are a gazillion kinds of liberals, it's the nature of liberal philosophy and "open minds", to the point where two different liberals wind up fighting over political resources for different purposes.

    So why can't there be more than one kind of conservative?

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Let the record show that I, for one, was opposed to the Bolshevik Revolution, Pol Pot, China (China??), Venezuela (ditto). I assume that what is being referenced are the Maoist victory over Chiang and the subsequent dark years, and the rise of Chávez/Maduro. These are all aspects of Left Fascism. Bleeding-heart, knee-jerk Liberals like myself don't like such regimes. Don't like MBS, Bolsonaro, Duterte, Erdogan, or Vladimir Putin either.

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    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    “Conservative, n: A statesman who is enamored of existing evils, as distinguished from the Liberal who wishes to replace them with others.” -Ambrose Bierce


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    Quote Originally Posted by MacLeod View Post
    ...and the "Right's" embracing of change: eg Pinochet and Franco...let's not play this simplistic game.
    They were certainly not held up as models of socialism and fairness. Good try, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange Magic View Post
    Let the record show that I, for one, was opposed to the Bolshevik Revolution, Pol Pot, China (China??), Venezuela (ditto). I assume that what is being referenced are the Maoist victory over Chiang and the subsequent dark years, and the rise of Chávez/Maduro. These are all aspects of Left Fascism. Bleeding-heart, knee-jerk Liberals like myself don't like such regimes. Don't like MBS, Bolsonaro, Duterte, Erdogan, or Vladimir Putin either.
    China was 'changed' into Communism by Mao - so it's a leader in 'equality' of opportunity, even if they had to kill (millions) for it. Erdogan is protecting his country - formerly communist - from unchecked immigration, as that country has a right to do. Putin is still wedded to the structures and regime of the former communist USSR; in fact, he's trying to get humpty dumpty back again. Conservatives are opposed to such social engineering, no matter what the government. They are usually free market types as they know this is the most effective measure of getting people out of poverty. Historically this has been the case. They're not into 'change' for the sake of change.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    “Conservative, n: A statesman who is enamored of existing evils, as distinguished from the Liberal who wishes to replace them with others.” -Ambrose Bierce
    Brilliant. I absolutely love it.

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    Great thinker that I should read more of. Is anyone familiar with the operas he wrote?

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