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Thread: Franco Bonisolli

  1. #16
    Senior Member howlingfantods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkasimer View Post
    But he's on his best behavior on the DG Tosca recording with Vishnevskaya, Manuguerra, and Rostropovich.
    He's pretty decent on the Traviata with Freni and the Cavalleria Rusticana with Arroyo too, albeit sort of blaring. I do dislike the Karajan studio Trovatore, but I think while Bonisolli's Manrico isn't good, he's not the worst thing on that set.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member Bonetan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Conte View Post
    Antonenko's top notes are a bit like that. I really don't like Bonisolli's voice irrespective of the poor musicality and style. This isn't even good technique. The registers aren't completely integrated and it is all far too effortful.

    N.
    There's a robustness that makes Bonisolli's top really thrilling for me. I've never heard Antonenko approach that personally, but is there a video you would recommend? I just listened to his Nessum Dorma. His high notes were super secure, but not nearly as exhilarating imho. Of course these are just recordings, so who know's how thrilled I would be by Bonisolli in the house...
    Last edited by Bonetan; Jan-14-2020 at 19:56.

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  5. #18
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    Bonisolli contributed to one of the more interesting late-Sutherland recordings: I Masnadieri


    Although he sang parts like Otello, Calaf, Chenier I probably enjoy him best in quite different rep.

    What can be confusing is that Bonisolli did not just sing lyric roles when he was young. Around the time he was a rough voiced Manrico and Turridu, he could sing French lyric rep with more grace

    Pecheurs de Perles Live in 1983


    Manon in 1974


    The flexibility of the voice could surprise
    Don Pasquale


    There are also records like Vespri Siciliani, Forza del Destino and Guglielmo Tell - notice he sang some of the most demanding rep - where he sounds akin to Filippeschi but with a warmer and more beautiful timbre.

    It is worth sampling his records for the times when voice and style came together and confirm he was undeniably a major artist.
    La Donna del Lago
    Last edited by Revitalized Classics; Jan-14-2020 at 21:16.

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  7. #19
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Conte View Post
    Karajan's Trovatore with Domingo, of course, not the sword throwing incident!

    N.
    I have no doubt if it had been recorded HvK would’ve put it on a DVD as how to deal with a recalcitrant tenor

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    I have no doubt if it had been recorded HvK would’ve put it on a DVD as how to deal with a recalcitrant tenor


    N.

  9. #21
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    I only have him in two operas: La traviata w/ Ann Moffo, in the 1966 RAI film that is infinitely better than Zeffirelli's, and La Fanciulla del West, and audio recording with Neblett. He's pretty good in both, though I have heard clips of him that were not so good. Essentially, I would say he's a middle of the pack tenor by old school standards, but would be quite welcome today.

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  11. #22
    Senior Member Sieglinde's Avatar
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    He had exactly the kind of crazy Leeroy Jenkins attitude Manrico needs

    And there was that intance when he was encored for a (long version!) Di quella pira.

    As for the sword-throwing incident, knowing what Karajan was like, and what Tenors(TM) are like, I'm not at all surprised. (Didn't Corelli try to fight an audience member with his stage sword once, also while being Manrico?)

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  13. #23
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vivalagentenuova View Post
    I only have him in two operas: La traviata w/ Ann Moffo, in the 1966 RAI film that is infinitely better than Zeffirelli's,
    Do you think so? I'm afraid I've never really taken to the 1966 version. Moffo sings very prettily of course and looks very beautiful, but I don't think she is ever really inside the role and skates over its deeper emotions. I feel much the same about her studio recording. Stratas, on the other hand, although vocally taxed, especially in Act I is absolutely believable, her Violetta quite shattering in its impact. The cuts in the Zeffirelli film annoy me, but I really think it one of the best examples of filmed opera I've ever seen. Actually I like Zeffirelli's Otello too, though the cuts here bother me more.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  15. #24
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    YouTube has a good bit of Bonisolli. He seems to have been able to sing tastefully when he chose to. There's some singing here that I would say puts any contemporary tenor in the shade:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8_9-93mjq4&t=332s
    He probably needed a firm hand. No doubt his ego outgrew his boots.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  17. #25
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sieglinde View Post
    Didn't Corelli try to fight an audience member with his stage sword once, also while being Manrico?
    Corelli was noted for his tantrums especially when aided by his wife. They held RCA to ransom during Carmen. Corelli had a row with a baritone and refused to work with him. The poor guy was sacked because baritones were in ready supply but there was only one Corelli - and didn't he know it!

  18. #26
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Corelli was noted for his tantrums especially when aided by his wife. They held RCA to ransom during Carmen. Corelli had a row with a baritone and refused to work with him. The poor guy was sacked because baritones were in ready supply but there was only one Corelli - and didn't he know it!
    And yet, oddly enough, Corelli was one of the few tenors Callas had an excellent working relationship with, Vickers being one of the others. When Vickers turned down the offer of Pollione to her last Normas in Paris (saying he feared the top C, though he did eventually sing it with Caballé - minus the top Cs), she asked for Corelli. According to Zeffirelli Corelli adored her and provided her with much needed support when she needed it.

    Famously Callas had falling outs with both Del Monaco and Di Stefano, but never with Corelli and they appeared on stage together quite a lot, though never, alas, in many complete recordings, the second Norma being a notable exception.
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Jan-15-2020 at 14:42.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  20. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Corelli was noted for his tantrums especially when aided by his wife. They held RCA to ransom during Carmen. Corelli had a row with a baritone and refused to work with him. The poor guy was sacked because baritones were in ready supply but there was only one Corelli - and didn't he know it!
    ........and the name of that "baritone" was??

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  22. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by nina foresti View Post
    ........and the name of that "baritone" was??
    Heck, that's all we need. A mystery Escamillo!

    N.

  23. #29
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nina foresti View Post
    ........and the name of that "baritone" was??
    Sorry recounted by Harold Schonberg in 'The Virtuosi'. Not sure whether he names the baritone.

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