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Thread: Classical Music Trivia Anyone?

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    Senior Member Room2201974's Avatar
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    Default Classical Music Trivia Anyone?

    Question number 1:

    In what famous successful performance does the performer not play a right note? (The correct answer identifies the performer and the piece of music that was performed.)

    Question number 2:

    Which piece in the standard repertoire is never performed with any right notes?

    Now, there are at least two different answers to the questions above, but I'm guessing with this group we may come up with others....and hopefully that will be the fun in it.

    Shall we begin?
    "One man's symphony is another man's earworm." ~ riffing on a R.A.H quote.

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    Why couldn't Mozart find his music teacher?

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    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Room2201974 View Post
    Question number 1:

    In what famous successful performance does the performer not play a right note? (The correct answer identifies the performer and the piece of music that was performed.)

    Question number 2:

    Which piece in the standard repertoire is never performed with any right notes?

    Now, there are at least two different answers to the questions above, but I'm guessing with this group we may come up with others....and hopefully that will be the fun in it.

    Shall we begin?
    What a fun thread idea! I have possible answers for both these questions- #1, I believe was a live recording by Rubinstein (or was it Richter?), of Chopin's Ballade No. 1. #2, There's probably lots of these due to transpositions, but the most famous is probably "Air on the D String" from Bach's 2nd Orchestral Suite. The original version is in G major, but for some reason when it's played stand-alone (e.g. on "relaxing classical music" albums or compilations) it's always transposed to D. Haven't the slightest inkling why, it's breathtakingly beautiful as it is.

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    Senior Member Room2201974's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    What a fun thread idea! I have possible answers for both these questions- #1, I believe was a live recording by Rubinstein (or was it Richter?), of Chopin's Ballade No. 1. #2, There's probably lots of these due to transpositions, but the most famous is probably "Air on the D String" from Bach's 2nd Orchestral Suite. The original version is in G major, but for some reason when it's played stand-alone (e.g. on "relaxing classical music" albums or compilations) it's always transposed to D. Haven't the slightest inkling why, it's breathtakingly beautiful as it is.
    Not the specific answers I was looking for, but wonderful examples. Thanks!
    "One man's symphony is another man's earworm." ~ riffing on a R.A.H quote.

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    Senior Member Forsooth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Room2201974 View Post
    Question number 1:

    In what famous successful performance does the performer not play a right note? (The correct answer identifies the performer and the piece of music that was performed.)

    Question number 2:

    Which piece in the standard repertoire is never performed with any right notes?

    Now, there are at least two different answers to the questions above, but I'm guessing with this group we may come up with others....and hopefully that will be the fun in it.

    Shall we begin?
    Question 2: Ravel, Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major. No "right" (hand) notes? Ravel is not one of my favs, so I don't know much about his works...

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    Senior Member Forsooth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkW View Post
    Why couldn't Mozart find his music teacher?
    Cause he was Haydn.

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    Senior Member Room2201974's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forsooth View Post
    Question 2: Ravel, Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major. No "right" (hand) notes? Ravel is not one of my favs, so I don't know much about his works...
    Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a winner and the correct answer to question 2. But the first question was always the hardest.
    "One man's symphony is another man's earworm." ~ riffing on a R.A.H quote.

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    Senior Member SONNET CLV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Room2201974 View Post
    Question number 1:

    In what famous successful performance does the performer not play a right note? (The correct answer identifies the performer and the piece of music that was performed.)
    I do have the following vinyl record in my collection. This one goes way back:

    0.jpg

    This version of the release VOX STPL 513.080 actually features a performance of Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy's Violin Concerto in E minor on Side A, not the Tchaikovsky Concerto which is advertised. Side A plays approximately 25 minutes. No documentation is available for this recording. Sleeve notes discuss the Tchaikovsky and Paganini Concertos.

    I've had this album since I was a youngster, and I likely listened to it the first several times thinking I was actually hearing Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto when I was actually hearing the Mendelssohn. Don't exactly recall when I go straight on these two works, but I do still have a tendency of mixing them up when I hear snatches of one or the other, say on the radio. Is that Tchaikovsky … or is it Mendelssohn …? (I wonder why.)

    In any case, I'm sure this isn't the answer to your query. But on this record, someone is playing every note of the Tchaikovsky Concerto not right. (But at the same time they sure do a great job with the unmentioned Mendelssohn.)

    Ironically, perhaps, the Sleeve Notes for this release begin with the words: "Tchaikovsky had bad luck..." Apparently that is true. He was not lucky enough to have his Concerto pressed on side A of this disc.
    Last edited by SONNET CLV; Jan-21-2020 at 05:26.

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    Senior Member Room2201974's Avatar
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    No, not the right answer, but I'm giving you bonus points for a great story and a great one liner.
    "One man's symphony is another man's earworm." ~ riffing on a R.A.H quote.

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Heifetz's recorded the Sibelius violin concerto several times. The notes to the reissue of the wonderful 1959 recording with Hendl and the Chicago say: "...he [Heifetz] even makes some improvements in the printed text (for instance, at the end of the third movement--where he begins the final downward plunge a third higher than is written)."

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    Senior Member Tchaikov6's Avatar
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    Florence Foster Jenkins's infamous "Queen of the Night" Aria? I can't imagine any of the notes were in tune.
    Quote Originally Posted by CypressWillow View Post
    There are those who don't like chocolate.

    There are those who don't see anything in the eyes of a dog.

    There are those who don't like the scent of a rose.

    There are those who don't enjoy waking up to the first snowfall of the year.

    And there are those who simply don't get Chopin.

    Pity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Room2201974 View Post
    Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a winner and the correct answer to question 2. But the first question was always the hardest.
    Well Ravel's wasn't the only concerto for left hand only. There are quite a few compositions composed for left hand only (not limited to concertos). It depends on your definition of "standard repertoire"
    Last edited by rice; Jan-21-2020 at 07:47.

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    Senior Member Room2201974's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rice View Post
    Well Ravel's wasn't the only concerto for left hand only. There are quite a few compositions composed for left hand only (not limited to concertos). It depends on your definition of "standard repertoire"
    Which is why I knew we would come up with other examples. Of all the concertos for left hand Ravel's is the most popular and well known however.

    Now, the first question hasn't been cracked yet and I thought by now it would be, considering the fact that I know a number of posters in this forum have read the correct answer. And although they didn't read it as a trivia question....they did read it as an example of a most facile musical mind.
    "One man's symphony is another man's earworm." ~ riffing on a R.A.H quote.

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    It's not the answer you're looking for, but the first question reminded me of the classic TV sketch of Morecambe and Wise with Andre Preview in Grieg's piano concerto....


    For the second question, Cage's 4'33" came to mind.
    Last edited by Art Rock; Jan-21-2020 at 13:40.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Room2201974 View Post
    Question number 1:

    In what famous successful performance does the performer not play a right note? (The correct answer identifies the performer and the piece of music that was performed.)

    Chopin did write a "wrong note" Etude. But I don't think that's the answer. Still, it's an entertaining piece … to a degree.


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