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Thread: Your Favorite Chopin Recordings

  1. #31
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    0047163514623abby.jpg
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    I grew up with LP's from Abbey Simon, still worth hearing.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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  3. #32
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malx View Post
    This set of the Nocturnes is one I play more than any other, it is currently available used at very reasonable prices on Amazon uk if anyone fancies a bargain:



    Attachment 129347

    (tip - when searching for it include the word Ultima or it may not appear)
    At first I didn't care for the Moravec nocturnes because I thought they were too sentimental, better used as background music. But I've really warmed up to them lately- the silky legato playing is really quite special, and he gives each piece a different sort of nocturnal mood. Very pearly, delicate, gossamer playing with incredible control. Only thing I don't like is how he sometimes conceals the left hand and only favors the main melody.

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malx View Post
    This set of the Nocturnes is one I play more than any other, it is currently available used at very reasonable prices on Amazon uk if anyone fancies a bargain:



    Attachment 129347

    (tip - when searching for it include the word Ultima or it may not appear)
    Is this the same that was released on Supraphon?

  5. #34
    Senior Member Dirge's Avatar
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    Mazurka in F major, Op. 68/3 (1829)
    :: Maryla Jonas [Columbia ’47] Sony
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52cC2Hi5bvY
    This brief early work is often dispatched with a bit of the nationalistic/patriotic spirit associated with Chopin’s polonaises, but in Jonas’s hands it sounds like a pensive yet faintly volatile funeral mazurka for a dead flower—no cannons buried here.

    24 Preludes, Op. 28 (1836–39)
    :: Claudio Arrau [Prague Spring, live ’60] apr
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDkhi9dt0TU&t=1473s
    This diverse opus has never sounded so organic or generated so much cumulative impact as it does here in Arrau’s uncompromisingly holistic performance, which has a dark and variously uneasy/agitated/disturbed/turbulent undercurrent throughout. There’s an insidiously seductive siren-like quality about the playing that gradually strengthens its hold on the listener, eventually luring him to his D-minor doom in the stormy final prelude, which fully embodies Cortot’s description “Du sang, de la volupté, de la mort” (“Of blood, of earthly pleasure, of death”).

    Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35 (1837–39)
    :: Sergei Rachmaninoff [Victor ’30] RCA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAmI...5BBkzoBGcDX0-J
    Playing so profoundly authoritative and expressive that you can’t not listen to it.

    Ballade No. 2 in F major, Op. 38 (1836–39)
    :: Alfred Cortot [HMV ’29] Biddulph
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OLifFiuWA8
    “To the manner born” is the inescapable thought when you hear Cortot play this ballade, so utterly natural and “just right” is his phrasing, characterization, and sense of flow.

    Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52 (1842/43)
    :: Josef Hofmann [Curtis Institute, live ’38] Marston
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqPN4gXy834
    The Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride of ballade performances, given just hours after Hofmann was fired as Director of the Curtis Institute.

    Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 55/2 (1842–44)
    :: Ignaz Friedman [Columbia ’36]
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYuXYE3MpiQ
    Brilliantly conceived and executed, with tremendous polyphonic clarity/control/coordination.

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  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    Is this the same that was released on Supraphon?
    It is, that "Ultima" transfer has a reputation for having excellent sound.

  8. #36
    Senior Member Malx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    It is, that "Ultima" transfer has a reputation for having excellent sound.
    Correct - it is one of the best sounding solo piano discs I have.
    Last edited by Malx; Jan-25-2020 at 22:30.

  9. #37
    Senior Member Malx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    At first I didn't care for the Moravec nocturnes because I thought they were too sentimental, better used as background music. But I've really warmed up to them lately- the silky legato playing is really quite special, and he gives each piece a different sort of nocturnal mood. Very pearly, delicate, gossamer playing with incredible control. Only thing I don't like is how he sometimes conceals the left hand and only favors the main melody.
    I will bow down to your knowledgeable technical appraisal - all I know is his playing sounds impressive and always keeps my attention when I'm listening.
    Last edited by Malx; Jan-25-2020 at 22:34.

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  11. #38
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    To answer Flamencosketches' question further--regarding the three releases of Ivan Moravec's Chopin Nocturnes: the original Nonesuch set was recorded AAD, while the Ultima reissue was remastered ADD, but only available as an import. The later Supraphon set is ADD, as well, so presumably Supraphon used the same remasters as the Ultima set; which yes, offers improved sound over the original AAD Nonesuch set.

    I'll return later in the thread to list my favorite Chopin pianists & recordings.

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  13. #39
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malx View Post
    I will bow down to your knowledgeable technical appraisal - all I know is his playing sounds impressive and always keeps my attention when I'm listening.
    No need to bow down! As a mediocre pianist, I aim for a slightly different conception of these works when I play them than Moravec does- mainly because I don't have the requisite skills to play as delicately and colorfully as he does. But I do enjoy his playing immensely and agree that it never fails to hold my attention!

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  15. #40
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Today, I heard Rachmaninoff's performance of the 2nd Sonata. "Wow" is a massive understatement. How anyone could play like that WITHOUT using the sustain pedal AT ALL defies my comprehension. Absolutely supernatural fingerwork. But the interpretation matches the technical exterior- restless, probing, and deeply imaginative. This is now my top version of this sonata next to Argerich (whose preludes and Barcarolle I also heard some of and enjoyed immensely). I also heard some of Sofronitsky's waltzes- a brilliantly individual brand of pianism that really bears the mark of creativity. What else should I check out from Sofronitsky considering this was my first encounter with him? I gather he's considered canonical in Scriabin, but is a composer that I stay away from.
    Last edited by Allegro Con Brio; Jan-28-2020 at 01:48.

  16. #41
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Today, I heard Rachmaninoff's performance of the 2nd Sonata. "Wow" is a massive understatement. How anyone could play like that WITHOUT using the sustain pedal AT ALL defies my comprehension. Absolutely supernatural fingerwork. But the interpretation matches the technical exterior- restless, probing, and deeply imaginative. This is now my top version of this sonata next to Argerich (whose preludes and Barcarolle I also heard some of and enjoyed immensely). I also heard some of Sofronitsky's waltzes- a brilliantly individual brand of pianism that really bears the mark of creativity. What else should I check out from Sofronitsky considering this was my first encounter with him? I gather he's considered canonical in Scriabin, but is a composer that I stay away from.
    His secret was big hands. No need for a sustain pedal when your fingers can span a 12th.

    As for Sofronitsky, it took me hearing his recordings to understand Scriabin, and now he's one of my favorite composers. Don't shy away.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    What else should I check out from Sofronitsky considering this was my first encounter with him? I gather he's considered canonical in Scriabin, but is a composer that I stay away from.
    Beethoven

    Andante favori WoO 57. Recording made on 28/11/1952
    sonata opus 27 n°2. Recording made on 3/2/1952 Leningrad
    sonata opus 28. Recording made on 26/2/1953
    sonata opus 57. Recording made on 10/10/1952 Moscow,
    sonata opus 111. Recording made on 3/2/1952

    Schubert

    Impromptu D899 n°1. Recording made on 1953
    Impromptu D899 n°3. Recording made on 13/5/1960
    Impromptu D899 n°4. Recording made on 13/5/1960
    Impromptu D935 n°2. Recording made on 19/8/1960
    Moments musicaux D780. Recording made on 27/2/1959
    sonata D784. Recording made on 25/12/1953
    sonata D960. Recording made on 25/1/1956,
    sonata D960. Recording made on 14/10/1960
    All the Schubert/Liszt he ever recorded

    Schumann

    sonata opus 11. Recording made on 13/5/1960
    Études symphoniques opus 13. Recording made on 18/11/1959
    Fantaisie opus 17. Recording made on 18/11/1959
    Kreisleriana opus 16. Recording made on 7/7/1952
    Papillons opus 2. Recording made on 22/7/1952

    Chopin

    Barcarolle opus 60. Recording made on 20/10/1949
    All the mazurkas he ever recorded
    Nocturn opus 9 n°2. Recording made on 1/7/1950
    Nocturn opus 27 n°2. Recording made on 20/10/1949
    Nocturn opus 37 n°2. Recording made on 21/11/1949
    Nocturn opus 48 n°1. Recording made on 21/11/1949
    Preludes opus 28. Recording made on 21/11/1949
    Scherzo opus 20. Recording made on 13/5/1960
    All the waltzes he ever recorded
    Last edited by Mandryka; Jan-29-2020 at 06:01.

  18. #43
    Senior Member howlingfantods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    Beethoven

    Andante favori WoO 57. Recording made on 28/11/1952
    sonata opus 27 n°2. Recording made on 3/2/1952 Leningrad
    sonata opus 28. Recording made on 26/2/1953
    sonata opus 57. Recording made on 10/10/1952 Moscow,
    sonata opus 111. Recording made on 3/2/1952

    Schubert

    Impromptu D899 n°1. Recording made on 1953
    Impromptu D899 n°3. Recording made on 13/5/1960
    Impromptu D899 n°4. Recording made on 13/5/1960
    Impromptu D935 n°2. Recording made on 19/8/1960
    Moments musicaux D780. Recording made on 27/2/1959
    sonata D784. Recording made on 25/12/1953
    sonata D960. Recording made on 25/1/1956,
    sonata D960. Recording made on 14/10/1960
    All the Schubert/Liszt he ever recorded

    Schumann

    sonata opus 11. Recording made on 13/5/1960
    Études symphoniques opus 13. Recording made on 18/11/1959
    Fantaisie opus 17. Recording made on 18/11/1959
    Kreisleriana opus 16. Recording made on 7/7/1952
    Papillons opus 2. Recording made on 22/7/1952

    Chopin

    Barcarolle opus 60. Recording made on 20/10/1949
    All the mazurkas he ever recorded
    Nocturn opus 9 n°2. Recording made on 1/7/1950
    Nocturn opus 27 n°2. Recording made on 20/10/1949
    Nocturn opus 37 n°2. Recording made on 21/11/1949
    Nocturn opus 48 n°1. Recording made on 21/11/1949
    Preludes opus 28. Recording made on 21/11/1949
    Scherzo opus 20. Recording made on 13/5/1960
    All the waltzes he ever recorded
    His Liszt b minor sonata from 1960 is excellent too.

  19. #44
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    Has anyone ever heard Chopin recordings as performed by Naira Netadze???

    I own a compilation of classical songs (aptly) named 101 Classical Greats. There are 5 Chopin recordings, 3 of which were performed by Naira Netadze:

    Prelude in D-flat major, op. 28 no. 15
    Waltz no. 7 in C-sharp minor, op. 64 no. 2
    Waltz no. 6 in D-flat major, op. 64 no. 1

    In my very humble opinion, these are three of the most moving recordings of all time. Other Chopin performers come close, but there is something indefinable in Naira's particular inflections that I cannot describe.

    So, being the musical enthusiast (and compulsive obsession-ist) I am, I began searching for other Naira recordings. Unfortunately, the internet has zero information on her and zero information about any additional recordings, only the 3 that I have already heard. I was even going to reach out to the company that published the compilation, alas, they have been out of business for over 10 years.

    Surely, she must have recorded more than 3 pieces!!!

    Any help or direction would be greatly appreciated!

  20. #45
    Senior Member Marc's Avatar
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    Vladimir Tropp: two (now OOP) discs for Denon (1996 and 1999), with a.o. the 2nd and 3rd Sonata.
    Very intense playing & a crystal clear piano recording.

    Here's a sample: 2nd movement of no. 2.


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