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Thread: Your Favorite Chopin Recordings

  1. #61
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    One pianist I haven’t seen mentioned is Stefan Askenase. He didn’t record everything Chopin wrote, certainly he seemed to steer clear of the etudes, and most of his recordings are in mono. He was not finger perfect, try listening to his mono waltzes for the odd imperfections, but one thing which cannot be denied is that he played Chopin with love. My favourite of his recordings are the complete Nocturnes, slower than most but so beautiful. And despite the imperfections I like his mono waltzes,l even more than the stereo remakes.
    And yet if I had to nominate just one recorded piece by Chopin I think it would be the 17th Prelude played by Michel Block. I often wondered what happened to him, the prelude formed part of a Heliodor recital shared with Pollini, but it is an incredibly romantic interpretation. Also on that disk was the opus 48/1 Nocturne. Really dreamy but In that nocturne only equalled by Argerich whose return of the first section in her Concertgebouw Recital is so propelled it has to be heard to be believed. Try it on Spotify
    Incidentally free steaming services such as Spotify or Deezer are a great way of revisiting well remembered well loved recordings of the past. And listened through Bluetooth the sound is probably far better than when we first got to know them.
    Last edited by Geoff48; Aug-20-2020 at 18:38.

  2. #62
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    My favourite nocturnes CD set is this one by Nelson Freire:



    Unlike many other pianists, he doesn't pound the cr*p out of the piano during the louder passages - they are nocturnes after all!

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  4. #63
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    Perhaps someone not on everyone's list... but the first compilation recording of Chopin that I heard at a friend's house that really made a lasting impression and made me ask about it.... was a CD from Vienna Masters Series which opened with Piano Concerto No. 1 and had a handful of other pieces following thereafter. All were played by a pianist by the name of Sylvia Capova. Not often I see her mentioned. But that particular CD made a lasting impression and made me an instant fan. I bought a copy of it shortly thereafter which I still have to this day. Probably one if my favorite CD's.

    Also I have a couple of double reels (2 albums each) featuring Tamas Vasary, which get played fairly regularly at my place. One features Piano Concerto No. 1 with Four Mazuraks on side 1, with 4 Scherzi on side 2. The other reel starts with Piano Concerto No. 2 followed by Adante Spianato and Grande Polonaise in E flat major, Op. 22, followed by Nocturne in C sharp minor, and on side 2 are Piano Sonatas No 2 & 3. Quite enjoyable.

  5. #64
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    I am about a million miles away from being an expert, but I know what I like ... and I like Fou Ts'Ong. So sadly lost to us from the deadly Covid 19 on December 28 ...

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  7. #65
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    Ballades 2 and 3: Pollini
    Nocturnes: Rubinstein
    Scherzos: Richter
    Waltzes: Lipatti
    Etudes: Zayas
    Concerto no.1: Lipatti
    Concerto no.2: Zimerman
    Everything else: Ohlsson
    Favorite box set: Ohlsson

  8. #66
    Senior Member Oldhoosierdude's Avatar
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    I have always liked this one
    51IKx-czCpL.jpg
    I don't live in the past,
    there's no future in it.

  9. #67
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    Barcarolle,Berceuse,Fantaisie - Perahia (1985)

    Cello Sonata - Alban Gerhardt,Steven Osborne (2007)

    Cello Sonata - Alisa Weilerstein,Inon Barnatan (2015)

    Cello Sonata - Rostropovich,Argerich (1981)

    Complete Works - Garrick Ohlsson (1989-2000)

    Études,Impromptus - Perahia (1983-2001)

    Études,Préludes,Polonaises - Pollini (1972-1976)

    Four Ballades - Perahia (1994)

    Four Ballades,Barcarolle,Fantasy - Zimerman (1987)

    Four Ballades,Berceuse,Barcarolle - Evgeny Kissin (1998)

    Les Sylphides - Zinman (1982)

    Nocturnes - Angela Hewitt (2004)

    Nocturnes - Claudio Arrau (1978)

    Nocturnes - Ivan Moravec (1966)

    Nocturnes - Livia Rev (1989)

    Nocturnes - Maria Joao Pires (1996)

    Nocturnes - Nelson Freire (2009)

    Piano concertos 1 & 2 - Argerich,Dutoit (1998)

    Piano concertos 1 & 2 - Zimerman,Giulini (1980)

    Piano Sonatas Nos. 2 & 3 - Pollini (1984)

    Piano Sonatas Nos. 2 & 3,Berceuse,Barcarolle - Andre Hamelin (2009)

    Piano Sonatas Nos. 2 & 3 - Martha Argerich (1967,1974)

    Preludes - Alexandre Tharaud (2008)

    Preludes - Claudio Arrau (1974)

    Preludes - Grigory Sokolov (1990)

    Preludes - Grigory Sokolov (2008)

    Preludes - Martha Argerich (1977)

    Scherzos - Ivo Pogorelich (1998)

    Waltzes - Alexandre Tharaud (2006)

    Waltzes - Ingrid Fliter (2009)

    The Rubinstein Collection

    Volume 44 - Piano Concertos (1958-1962)
    Volume 45 - Ballades & Scherzo (1959-1965)
    Volume 46 - Piano Sonatas,etc. (1961-1962)
    Volume 47 - Waltzes & Impromptus (1962-1964)
    Volume 48 - Polonaises (1964)
    Volume 49 - Nocturnes (1965)
    Volume 50 - Mazurkas (1965-1966)

  10. #68
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    Not sure this is an absolute favourite, but very enjoyable...

    s-l400.jpg

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  12. #69
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    Moravec's Nocturnes are a delight to listen to, these are the Chopin discs I revisit most - are they the 'best', I couldn't say but they certainly give me plenty of pleasure.


    Last edited by Malx; Apr-09-2021 at 11:35.

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  14. #70
    Senior Member WNvXXT's Avatar
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    Last edited by WNvXXT; Apr-09-2021 at 12:55.

  15. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Dee View Post
    Not sure this is an absolute favourite, but very enjoyable...

    s-l400.jpg
    One of the first few LPs I ever bought, well over half a century ago. Ah, the memories.

  16. #72
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    With this entry, I'm initiating a series of three or four posts on this thread where I'll try to list & rank what have been my favorite Chopin pianists & recordings over the decades in various Chopin piano works. I intend to place the performances into two categories for each work: (1) historical or mono performances, and (2) analogue stereo & digital era performances. As always, don't take my rankings too seriously, as tastes & expectations will vary; although I hope to introduce people to some very remarkable Chopin pianists, if they don't already know them. For my first post, I'll start with Chopin's Berceuse, 24 Préludes, Etudes, and the Four Impromptus. I'll then cover other major Chopin piano works in subsequent posts--that is, if there seems to be an interest in what I'm doing:

    1. Berceuse (or "Lullaby" in English--though it wasn't Chopin's title):

    --Top 5 historical picks (mono):

    1. Maryla Jonas: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJmoFk5c-Oo
    2. Raoul Koczalski: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPL2bgEv_R0
    3. Harold Bauer (1939): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzrGbshA5yk
    4. Mieczyslaw Horszowski (1940): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHKEVKNTBdc
    5. Tie--Ignacy Jan Paderewski: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-02elNMQbQo
    5. Tie--Moriz Rosenthal (1930): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a8dDp_JLI8

    Honorable mention (historical):
    --Solomon (Cutner)(1945): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LxjqxnrDi07.
    --Benno Moiseiwitsch (1916): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bQWmsq3s8U
    --Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QO9VYfDrcqM

    --Top 5 analogue stereo & digital era picks:

    1. Jeanne-Marie Darré (1965, Vanguard): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpTvu4P5M_k
    2. Vladimir Ashkenazy 2 (Decca, digital, hybrid SACD): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCsSn7BdwWE
    3. Ivan Moravec (Vox, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ox92r5zW0I
    4. Vladimir Ashkenazy 1 (Decca): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dhVzkZk7xc
    5. Nikita Magaloff (Philips): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TioDrnJHB4

    Honorable mention:
    --Murray Perahia (digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OizkT4wRjdo
    --Nelson Freire (digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9AfgeNXnSY

    2. 24 Préludes:

    --Top 5 historical picks (mono):

    1. Guiomar Novaes (1950): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eP6WcQ-A4nk
    2. Halina-Czerny Stefanska (1958): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6qC4Dz_FD4
    3. Moriz Rosenthal (1920s & 30s): Unfortunately, Rosenthal was no longer in his prime when he came to make records, & he didn't record all 24 Préludes, but what he did record is magical, anyway. Rosenthal was a student of Chopin's teaching assistant, Karol Mikuli (1821-1897), and Franz Liszt (1811-1886), so he had the right pedigree for this music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFHOuyeb3L8.
    4. Raoul Koczalski (1939)--Koczalski was another Mikuli pupil:
    1-14: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhfmiuVSnDw
    15-22: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFSPMrxTgdk
    23-24: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD14h9YLmqM
    5. Alfred Cortot: I prefer Cortot's earlier 1928 recording, which is superior to his later recordings, IMO, but still technically slightly weak in places: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWVbUnhgcrY

    --Top 1-5 analogue stereo & digital era picks:

    1. Ivan Moravec 1 (1965, Connoisseur Society): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUlrlysEKQk
    2. Tie--Vladimir Ashkenazy 1 (1978, Decca): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4c52VcMSmk
    2. Tie--Ivan Moravec 2 (1974, Supraphon): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p8h9FgAbfQ
    4. Jeanne-Marie Darré (1965, Vanguard):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKfbjF2w0rA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIolDX8s3k0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZ8ruqRz6l8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mfo6y7BrPY0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXOYx9_y_y0
    https://www.allmusic.com/album/chopi...01386520#no-js
    5. Vladimir Ashkenazy (a live 1972 recording made at Essex University in England, Decca): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjQQfsp8hsE

    --Top 6-10 analogue stereo & digital era picks (in 6-10, I found it impossible to decide on my choices for the 9th & 10th spots, so I opted instead for a whole bunch of "ties", & especially in #9, as they're all remarkable performances):

    6. Nikita Magaloff (Philips):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leDfSUSlqwA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlT4dCsRnF8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPfjBCzphF4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjvRxhYbxOs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9x97eI5znw
    7. Vladimir Ashkenazy 2 (1992, Decca, digital):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPxOisgmFso
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY_N...fCm5qk&index=1
    8. Samson François (1963, EMI):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNt6Yj4nM2U
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkMRWF-TeWs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-Iy4Pk0DRM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uc03OL3CXw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wz9rgDhOW08
    9. Tie--Geza Anda (1960s--from the DG box set, "Geza Anda: Troubadour at the piano"):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1r-E6G-RIU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9IheNY6bFU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo-x7pRuVx4
    9. Tie--Maurizio Pollini--(live 1974, EMI Testament): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnXMX31ApWQ
    9. Tie--Ivo Janssen (live, Globe/VOID, digital):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfG6kFKJPY8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPE1H0QHGKA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSq9o9sc_Rc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjP9J1hJP6M
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcfxCIGjbcs
    9. Tie--Nelson Freire (Sony/Columbia):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwPkoFRDPN8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeptXKKeAm0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uprGsUu59OY
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfkkmnZpcF4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtEENeJtqzk
    10. Tie--Ivo Pogorelich (DG, digital): Pogorelich's interpretation of the Preludes may not be to all tastes, as he occasionally lingers a bit and draws them out in places, but he has over the years, with repeated listening, gradually converted me to his point of view in this music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISQdvh1BMuI.
    10. Tie--Martha Argerich (DG): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6NL...s3nQgWhj8IXryM

    Honorable mention: There are many other fine performances of Chopin's 24 Préludes, some of which came close to being on my list above--notably Pollini (DG), Pires, & Blechacz, who could have each placed in my #10 spot, where the choice was more difficult to make:

    --Maurizio Pollini--(1975, DG): https://www.youtube.com/watch?
    --Maria Joao Pires (DG, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCs9...68t8NaRe-TKFnz
    --Rafal Blechacz (DG, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Nvg...cfc2kgm8fCm5qk
    --Ingrid Fliter (EMI, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vah3...GaB7TM&index=1

    3. Études (Op. 10, Op. 25, & Trois nouvelles études):

    --Top 4 historical Picks (mono):

    1. Wilhelm Backhaus (1927): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdSruw4Ghmg
    2. Jeanne-Marie Darré (1953, EMI Pathé): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkEpzFLcsJs
    3. Claudio Arrau (1956, EMI): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ulMPi-NXbmU
    4. Samson François (1958, EMI):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wk9BGxCbEoA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHNQ...oXOv3N&index=6
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoDHwbHVtRQ

    --Top 7 historical pianists playing individual etudes:

    1. Francis Planté (1839-1934): two etudes, Op. 25, No. 1 and Op. 10 No. 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwYUUTZn1ZA. Planté studied with Antonine Marmontel in Paris, where he also befriended and studied with Franz Liszt. Most interestingly, he is known to have actually heard Chopin play, and not surprisingly, he plays Chopin in a different style from pianists today. His only Chopin recordings were of selected Etudes, which he recorded in 1928, at the age of 89!! Which is something to bear in mind when listening to Planté play Chopin's difficult Etude Op. 25, no. 11: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2f_CJ4gOMY. His playing must have been incredible in his younger days.

    Here's a link to all of Planté's Chopin Etudes recordings from 1928: https://www.forte-piano-pianissimo.c...cisplante.html

    2. Leopold Godowsky: Etudes Op. 25, No. 1 and No. 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MxSRar1Je-w.
    3. Emil von Sauer: Etude Op. 25, No. 12 "Ocean": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnKv1BCVaDw
    4. Vladimir de Pachmann: who studied with Vera Kologrivoff, Chopin's last teaching assistant, and also studied privately with Franz Liszt, who according to Pachmann's son, taught the pianist everything he could remember about how Chopin played his music.

    Etudes Op. 25, Nos. 2 & 3 (1911-15): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93L3WPb2Z68
    Etude Op. 10, No. 5 (1927): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QCX4P7uHPc
    Etude Op. 10, No. 1 (1911): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uwx_HaZOm80
    Etude Op. 10, No. 12 (1909): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-L_eivHxQ8
    Etude Op. 10, No. 12 (1912): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfZ8zEQR_5k

    5. Moriz Rosenthal: 3 Nouvelles études, Op. Posth., B. 130: No. 2 in A-Flat Major: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3qc57hWtKY.
    6. Maryla Jonas: Etude Op. 10, No. 6, and Etude Op. 25, No. 2 "Les Abeilles": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVKt...I09xA&index=34
    7. Ignaz Friedman: Etudes Op. 10, No. 5 "Black keys, No. 7, No. 12, and Etudes Op. 25, No. 6 & No. 9: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpfMOUtscB4

    --Top 10 analogue stereo & digital era picks:

    1. Augustin Anievas (EMI Double fforte): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OtY...uMIEP9ZlkOMGQg
    2. Vladimir Ashkenazy (Decca): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oO13...nkRQSgOYLSQ48w
    3. Tamás Vásáry, (DG): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsK5...aY2ZAY&index=1
    4. Zlata Chochieva (Piano Classics, digital): The playing of this young woman is impressive!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcd7fvL68z4
    (Here too is Chochieva playing the Op. 25 Etudes live in concert: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQRLhz0coRU.)
    5. Murray Perahia (CBS, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--4L...88C5B441541DA4
    6. Louis Lortie (1986, Chandos, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgiZ...DA01954CDE2C57
    7. Maurizio Pollini (DG): for me, Pollini can sometimes have too heavy a piano touch in Chopin, but there's no denying that his etudes are among his best Chopin recordings: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMM6...2B9689AF8360A7
    8. Juana Zayas: (1983, Music & Arts, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIGzGXJIB30
    9. Nelson Freire (Decca, digital, released on both CD & hybrid SACD):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlHvJ011zxM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3ueRfTKIEg
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-a74O3PmM8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGfauMZqdUI.
    10. Tie--Andrei Gavrilov (EMI, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRsC...gwLolrUG61VFuQ
    10. Tie--György Cziffra (EMI): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WG0dVHRhDs4

    The reason the latter "big virtuoso" performances don't figure higher on my list is because I'm not always a fan of pianists that turn these etudes into loud, showy, fast 'virtuoso' pieces. For me, such an approach has more in common with a style of pianism that derives from the mid-20th century (and later), rather than a style of playing that goes back to the 19th century. For a more 19th century approach to these etudes, I'd recommend the Etudes of Wilhelm Backhaus, who is my top historical pick, as well as Jeanne-Marie Darré, and of course the individual Etudes by Francis Planté, Vladimir de Pachmann, Moriz Rosenthal--who each had links back to Chopin & his world, along with Emil von Sauer, Leopold Godowsky, & Maryla Jonas. While my top stereo era pick, Agustin Anievas, likewise turns these pieces more into music--as opposed to virtuosic display pieces, than many other pianists. Others will no doubt be dazzled by the "big virtuoso" performances & disagree. & I wouldn't deny that they are 'great' performances of a certain kind.

    4. Four Impromptus:

    --Top 3 historical picks (mono):

    1. Emil von Sauer:
    No. 1 (1925): For me, this is the greatest performance of Chopin's Impromptu No. 1 ever recorded. It is truly something special from a lost age. No pianist today can touch this performance, IMO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AZ8C2TdWn0
    No. 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjXuYqnyQdA
    No. 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgCV8H9Inyg
    No. 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pa6EZ1FlA5Q
    2. Samson François (EMI, 1957): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtSCi6oAe5U
    3. Mieczyslaw Horszowski (1952): Unfortunately, these performances come in poor sound, otherwise, they might be a higher pick. Horszowski also had a direct link back to Chopin, through his mother, who had studied with Mikuli, and was Horszowski's first piano teacher when he was a boy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_J87nHs4RE.

    --Top 7 historical picks for individual Impromptus, including the Fantasie-Impromptu in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 66:

    1. Vladimir de Pachmann: Impromptu No. 1 in A flat, Op. 29: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGfvqchcYys
    2. Josef Hoffmann: Impromptu No. 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q63bx9ILU60
    3. Leopold Godowsky (1921-25): two impromptus: the Impromptu in A flat & Fantasie Impromptu in C-Sharp Minor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74qrrd7z4Ks.
    4. Maryla Jonas: the Impromptu No. 1:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2CH-MgRa2Q
    5. Halina Czerny-Stefanska: Fantaisie-Impromptu (1949): I'm not certain that Czerny-Stefanska recorded all four Impromptus in her career, but she did play the Fantasie-impromptu exceptionally well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNtfUeA7U0I.
    6. Witold Malcuzynski: Impromptu No. 1 (1959): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQ9cJBM1olM
    7. Raoul Pugno, Impromptu No. 1 (1903): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7x4R8jU5zv4

    --Top 10 analogue stereo & digital era picks:

    1. Tamás Vásáry (DG)--Vásáry's remarkable performances of the Four Impromptus are among the best recordings that he has made in his career, IMO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44qq...Y2ZAY&index=25
    2. Agustin Anievas (EMI): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5Be...1jB1w&index=20
    3. Vladimir Ashkenazy (Decca):
    No. 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuVxl2k5tAE
    No. 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyCnYZRwR4w
    No. 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcdSECcqb2Y
    No. 4: "Fantaisie-Impromptu": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2c-KITvexw
    4. Bella Davidovich (Philips, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCKy...CVegqw&index=5
    5. Nikita Magaloff (1975, Philips): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8FsvlZbtlw
    6. Arthur Rubinstein (RCA): Generally speaking, Rubinstein takes too many liberties with Chopin's scores, for my tastes, as I can find his unwillingness to pay closer attention to the score disconcerting at times (in contrast to a pianist like Ashkenazy, for instance, who pays extra close attention to the score), but his freer approach does work better in the 4 Impromptus, IMO. & no doubt some listeners will like that Rubinstein takes 'creative' liberties with what Chopin asks for from the pianist:
    No. 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBoDUJEmYyI
    No. 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzEeyYshJZc
    No. 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9arCBxnpxvg
    No. 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BS85REvajOw
    7. Dubravka Tomsic (Pilz, digital): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbnlTvBj7mo
    8. Stanislav Bunin (DG, digital): For those looking to be challenged by an occasionally different interpretative view of these works, Bunin's Four Impromptus are very recommendable (& beautiful in their own way): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6Tm...ifOVKp1wpeRiGA
    9. Murray Perahia (CBS, digital)--Perahia's Chopin shouldn't be ignored, either, since he too has links back to Mikuli through his teacher Horszowski (though at some point these connections start to get watered down, as is the case with most teaching lineages, sadly):
    No. 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kE4tIrc7vY0
    No. 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3Q8ggWXYlg
    No. 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk4OhC9MUlQ
    No. 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AbaIHf5_YSI.
    10. Stefan Askenase (1975, DG): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rj6adVbretI

    To be continued in a later post with the 21 Nocturnes & 51 Mazurkas, etc...
    Last edited by Josquin13; May-03-2021 at 22:04.

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  18. #73
    Junior Member ThankYouKiwi's Avatar
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    Frederic Chiu's recordings of the etudes aren't my favorite, but they're a really interesting listen. He makes them sound very fresh and fluid. You've never heard them like this before.

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    Senior Member Bwv 1080's Avatar
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    Moravec, Zimerman and Rubenstein

    Moravec's recording of the Polonaise Fantasy is probably my favorite Chopin recording (and this is a great bargain 2-disc set that everyone should own - the Debussy playing is equally good)


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    Quote Originally Posted by ThankYouKiwi View Post


    Frederic Chiu's recordings of the etudes aren't my favorite, but they're a really interesting listen. He makes them sound very fresh and fluid. You've never heard them like this before.
    Thanks for the introduction to Frederic Chiu's Chopin Etudes. I agree they are fascinating, and "very fresh and fluid", as you say. Had I known about them before I wrote my above post, his Etudes would have ranked high on my list of analogue stereo & digital era recordings of the Etudes. On first impression, they are among the best digital era accounts I've heard & possibly even the finest. I hope they're still in print...

    If Chiu's Etudes aren't your favorite, what is?

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